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7

Heydar Aliyev Center

The Heydar Aliyev Center is a 619,000-square-foot building complex in Baku, Azerbaijan designed by Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid and noted for its distinctive architecture and flowing, curved style that eschews sharp angles.

The Heydar Aliyev Center represents a fluid form which emerges by the folding of the landscape’s natural topography and by the wrapping of individual functions of the Center. All functions of the Center, together with entrances, are represented by folds in a single continuous surface. This fluid form gives an opportunity to connect the various cultural spaces whilst at the same time, providing each element of the Center with its own identity and privacy. As it folds inside, the skin erodes away to become an element of the interior landscape of the Center.

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Text source: wikipedia

10

Dune Villa

A site in a pine forest with a height difference of six meters is unique in the Netherlands. The clients are aware of that and asked us to design a ‘living’ house which fully adopts the qualities of the plot. They cite three icons as a reference, each with their own qualities. De scenic naturalness of F.L. Wright, the openness of Mies van der Rohe and the tactile materiality of Zumthor. With a sense of necessary modesty we accepted the assignment.

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4

The Longsheng Rice Terraces

The terraced fields are built along the slope winding from the riverside up to the mountain top, between 600 m to 800 m above sea level. The coiling line that starts from the mountain foot up to the mountain top divides the mountain into layers of water in spring, layers of green rice shoots in summer, layers of rice in fall, and layers of frost in winter. The terraced fields were mostly built about 650 years ago.

Longji (Dragon’s Backbone) Terraced Rice Fields received their name because the rice terraces resemble a dragon’s scales, while the summit of the mountain range looks like the backbone of the dragon. Visitors standing on the top of the mountain can see the dragon’s backbone twisting off into the distance. In an early morning, when the weather is fine, the sunrise on the summit of Longji Rice Terraces is magnificent.

They are beautiful in early June. At this time, water is pumped over the rice paddies and young plants are transferred to the main terraces.

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Source: wiki

4

Shanghai Marina Bay

This is the:  Shanghai Marina Bay. 

Shanghai is currently the city where you should be if you are in architecture. Does anyone have any tips where to go? Go over there next year!!

5

The Vieux Port pavilion

A polished steel canopy reflects visitors walking underneath at this events pavilion in Marseille’s harbour.

Supported by eight slender columns, the stainless-steel structure stretches over the paving to create a sheltered events space in the city’s Old Port. The roof features sharply tapered edges, creating the impression of a paper-like thickness.

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10

Bridge House

A narrow house form, spans over the creek. Glazing each side opens the house to views in both directions, giving the feeling of living amongst the trees.

Two steel trusses forming the primary structure, were fabricated off site and erected by two men and a crane in two days. They were anchored by four small concrete piers, poured each side of the creek. Spanning between the trusses is a concrete floor slab on steel decking with a layer of rigid insulation. The “box” walling and roofing is plantation pine.

Architects: Max Pritchard Architect
Location: Adelaide, Australia
Consultant: Engineers Pocius & Associates
Constructed Area: 110 sqm
Project year: 2008
Photographs: Sam Noonan

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5

Cardboard Cathedral

The Cardboard Cathedral in Christchurch, New Zealand, is the transitional pro-cathedral of the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch opened in August 2013. It was designed by architect Shigeru Ban and seats around 700 people.

It rises 21 metres (69 ft) above the altar. Materials used include 60-centimetre (24 in)-diameter cardboard tubes, timber and steel. The roof is of polycarbon, with eight shipping containers forming the walls. The foundation is concrete slab.

The architect wanted the cardboard tubes to be the structural elements, but local manufacturers could not produce tubes thick enough and importing the cardboard was rejected. The 96 tubes, reinforced with laminated wood beams, are “coated with waterproof polyurethane and flame retardants” with two-inch gaps between them so that light can filter inside. Instead of a replacement rose window, the building has triangular pieces of stained glass. The building serves as a conference venue as well as a cathedral.

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Text source: Wikipedia

9

Pretty Architecture presents: See-Through Glass House #2

This dramatic glass-enclosed contemporary home has an open floor plan encompassing the kitchen, dining room and two living spaces on the main level, plus hardwood floors and floor-to-ceiling bookshelves. 

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Source: frontdoor.com

6

Park & Suites Arena 

Park&Suites Arena (also known as the ARENA) is an indoor arena located in the Montpellier suburb, in the south of France that opened in September 2010. It has a seating capacity of 14,000 spectators, with 9,000 for sporting events.[1] It will host the European matches of Montpellier Agglomération Handball and the Open Sud de France tennis tournament. It also hosted the XXXI World Rhythmic Gymnastics Championships which served as a qualification process for the 2012 Summer Olympic Games. The arena will host the 2015 European Artistic Gymnastics Championships during April 13–19, 2015.


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Images from: visio-technic

9

The Sliding House

When the house slides open it is an unusual sight to behold.  Four electric motors silently slide the 20 ton outer house shell back to reveal the inner glass and steel structure. The motors that power this sliding run on car batteries automatically recharged through solar power.

Currently the house shell slides back 28 meters (92 feet), a trip that takes about 6 minutes. In the “back” position the shell shades a patio. The London-based architectural firm that designed the house, de Rijke Marsh Morgan, allowed for the possibly of extending the track further to allow the roof shell to cover a garden or swimming pool.

5

ROSE SEIDLER HOUSE

‘When the house was finished, people used to come in… people were four deep. My mother had to leave the house sometimes on the weekend, because they were all standing around the windows you know, trying to see this incredible contraption’ (architect Harry Seidler, 2003)

When completed in 1950, Rose Seidler House was ‘the most talked about house in Sydney’. Designed by the young Harry Seidler for his parents Rose and Max, the house overturned almost every convention of suburban home design.

The radical design both inside and out integrated architecture, art and technology in a bold and optimistic vision for a new way of living. Today, still surrounded by bushland with panoramic views of Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park, the house is one of the finest examples of mid 20th-century modern domestic architecture in Australia, and its furniture and fittings form one of the most complete and intact post World War II design collections in public ownership.

Tekst source: sydneylivingmuseums.com.au
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6

Bank of China Tower (SPECIAL)

WITH PAPER MODEL

The Bank of China Tower (abbreviated BOC Tower) is one of the most recognisable skyscrapers in Admiralty,Hong Kong. It houses the headquarters for the Bank of China (Hong Kong) Limited. The building is located at 1 Garden Road, in Central and Western District on Hong Kong Island.

Designed by I. M. Pei and L.C Pei of I.M Pei and Partners, the building is 315.0 m (1,033.5 ft) high with two masts reaching 367.4 m (1,205.4 ft) high. It was the tallest building in Hong Kong and Asia from 1989 to 1992, and it was the first building outside the United States to break the 305 m (1,000 ft) mark. It is now the fourth tallest skyscraper in Hong Kong, after International Commerce Centre, Two International Finance Centre and Central Plaza.

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Tekst source: wiki

4

Sky Penthouse in Israel

Stretching over the top three floors of the W Tower in Park Tzameret, a state of the art penthouse boasts incredible views over Tel Aviv and the Mediterranean Sea. The fully automatic smart home has it’s own private elevator atop the 45 floor building below, as well as a private pool and even a maids room.

The stunning space features a cavernous dual story living area, enabling the installation of a towering water feature that cascades down over a six meter drop. 

An open plan design allows the awesome city views to be enjoyed throughout each area of the home, whether relaxing, dining or cooking. Floating above the sweeping city offers complete privacy up near the clouds, making this home the perfect place for both relaxing away from the world and for entertaining guests. 

To take advantage of the massive ceiling heights, a mezzanine level cuts through the space, offering up a novel extra seating area where the homeowner can hang out or read from the home library shelves situated there. The mezzanine has been constructed with glass floors and balustrades that give the area a feeling that it is floating above the dwelling below. 

Source: Pretty Architecture!

4

Flying Houses

First I want to thank everyone for following! I’m now over 2100 followers! Less than a week ago I was on 1800 followers. Everyone thank you so much! 

Today a new post with pictures of flying houses. Beautiful images that speak to the imagination! Inspiration for new ideas! 

See you tomorrow! 

Regards, 

Sam

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6

National Theatre, Beijing China

The National Centre for the Performing Arts (NCPA) (simplified Chinese: 国家大剧院;  literally: National Grand Theatre), and colloquially described as The Giant Egg, is an opera house in Beijing, People’s Republic of China. The Centre, an ellipsoid dome of titanium and glass surrounded by an artificial lake, seats 5,452 people in three halls and is almost 12,000 m² in size. It was designed by French architect Paul Andreu. Construction started in December 2001 and the inaugural concert was held in December 2007.

The exterior of the theater is a titanium accented glass dome that is completely surrounded by a man-made lake. It is said to look like an egg floating on water, or a water drop. It was designed as an iconic feature, something that would be immediately recognizable.

The dome measures 212 meters in east–west direction, 144 meters in north–south direction, and is 46 meters high. The main entrance is at the north side. Guests arrive in the building after walking through a hallway that goes underneath the lake. The titanium shell is broken by a glass curtain in north–south direction that gradually widens from top to bottom.

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Source: wiki

2

New Norwegian Opera and Ballet, Oslo, Norway

This landmark building by Snøhetta, who also designed the new Library of Alexandria (2002), is the largest cultural center built in Norway in 700 years. Its sloping stone roof - made up of 36,000 fitted pieces – rises up from the fjord; allowing members of the public, residents and opera goers alike, to walk over the building, developing a relationship with the public structure.

Integral to the 1,000-room interior, which is largely lined with crafted woodwork (using the traditions of Norwegian boat builders), are a number of art commissions interwoven into the structural fabric, including a cloakroom, a collaboration with their 2007 Serpentine Pavilion collaborator Olafur Eliasson.

Photo’s: Bustler