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exubiytsa  asked:

✦ fite fite fite

[ ✦ ] my muse pushes yours out of frustration/anger. || @exubiytsa

       “Are you— do you have something in that head?!” Hawkeye approached the man threateningly. “You just fight and punch and make everything explode without looking at your surroundings!” A finger was pressed against the center of his chest. “Now, thanks to you, we don’t have a ride home. Now, thanks to you, we are stuck here with no way out. An island! A fucking island! And everyone is like: ‘oh yeah let’s follow the Winter Soldier, he knows what he’s doing’; or ‘oh let’s do what the man with a metal arm says, we’ll live longer’. Well, fuck you. I say you are a worthless piece of shit.” That being said, Clint pushed Bucky with less than half his strength. His goal was not to make him fall, but to demonstrate his honesty.

Social media news sources ranked in new study

A new study by the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that most people who use social media to get news often don’t trust the content.

We are living in a time where we have more information available to each of us than ever before in history. However, we are not all proficient at distinguishing between good information and bad information, which is true for liberal, moderate and conservative social media consumers.

So why get do we all choose to get it from social media? Probably because it matches with the beliefs and information already held within their echo-chambers. Or probably because it’s easiest to get news when you’re already scrolling through social media all day long (I know I am guilty of this)… 68% of U.S. adults get their news from social media currently, so it’s no surprise that most of the information obtained is done so without much thought. In a separate study performed, Pew Research found that the social platforms people intentionally visit the most to get news are Linkedin, Twitter and Reddit, and the sites people stumble upon most to accidentally receive news are Facebook, Instagram and Youtube (the most popular).

However, fewer than 25% of people studied have a “great deal” of trust for social media as news sources overall, and that number plummets to 12% for Facebook. Overall, Snapchat had the lowest percentage of people willing to say they trust the platform as a news source at all. This is probably because not many people would be inclined to seek out the completely unimportant news that makes up the majority of Snapchat’s lineup, which has always been a personal aversion of mine.

Young Americans: Most See Trump as Illegitimate President

Jermaine Anderson keeps going back to the same memory of Donald Trump, then a candidate for president of the United States, referring to some Mexican immigrants as rapists and murderers.

“You can’t be saying that (if) you’re the president,” says Anderson, a 21-year-old student from Coconut Creek, Florida.

That Trump is undeniably the nation’s 45th president doesn’t sit easily with young Americans like Anderson who are the nation’s increasingly diverse electorate of the future, according to a new poll. A majority of young adults - 57% - see Trump’s presidency as illegitimate, including about three-quarters of blacks and large majorities of Latinos and Asians, the GenForward poll found.

GenForward is a poll of adults age 18 to 30 conducted by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago with The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

A slim majority of young whites in the poll, 53%, consider Trump a legitimate president, but even among that group 55 percent disapprove of the job he’s doing, according to the survey.

“That’s who we voted for. And obviously America wanted him more than Hillary Clinton,” said Rebecca Gallardo, a 30-year-old nursing student from Kansas City, Missouri, who voted for Trump.

Millennials Could End Up the Biggest Losers of Trump’s Fiscal Policies

Trump’s legitimacy as president was questioned earlier this year by Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga.: “I think the Russians participated in helping this man get elected. And they helped destroy the candidacy of Hillary Clinton.”

Trump routinely denies that and says he captured the presidency in large part by winning states such as Michigan and Wisconsin that Clinton may have taken for granted.

Overall, just 22% of young adults approve of the job he is doing as president, while 62 percent disapprove.

Trump’s rhetoric as a candidate and his presidential decisions have done much to keep the question of who belongs in America atop the news, though he’s struggling to accomplish some key goals. Powered by supporters chanting, “build the wall,” Trump has vowed to erect a barrier along the southern U.S. border and make Mexico pay for it - which Mexico refuses to do. Federal judges in three states have blocked Trump’s executive orders to ban travel to the U.S. from seven - then six - majority-Muslim nations.

In Honolulu, U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson this week cited “significant and unrebutted evidence of religious animus” behind the travel ban, citing Trump’s own words calling for “a complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.”

These States Want to Make It Easier for Millennials to Save for Retirement

And yes, Trump did say in his campaign announcement speech on June 6, 2015: “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their bestThey’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.” He went farther in subsequent statements, later telling CNN: “Some are good and some are rapists and some are killers.”

It’s extraordinary rhetoric for the leader of a country where by around 2020, half of the nation’s children will be part of a minority race or ethnic group, the Census Bureau projects. Non-Hispanic whites are expected to be a minority by 2044.

Of all of Trump’s tweets and rhetoric, the statements about Mexicans are the ones to which Anderson returns. He says Trump’s business background on paper is impressive enough to qualify him for the presidency. But he suggests that’s different than Trump earning legitimacy as president.

“I’m thinking, he’s saying that most of the people in the world who are raping and killing people are the immigrants. That’s not true,” said Anderson, whose parents are from Jamaica.

Millennials Are Not Being Rewarded for Job Loyalty

Megan Desrochers, a 21-year-old student from Lansing, Michigan, says her sense of Trump’s illegitimacy is more about why he was elected.

“I just think it was kind of a situation where he was voted in based on his celebrity status verses his ethics,” she said, adding that she is not necessarily against Trump’s immigration policies.

The poll participants said in interviews that they don’t necessarily vote for one party’s candidates over another’s, a prominent tendency among young Americans, experts say. And in the survey, neither party fares especially strongly.

Just a quarter of young Americans have a favorable view of the Republican Party, and 6 in 10 have an unfavorable view. Majorities of young people across racial and ethnic lines hold negative views of the GOP.

The Democratic Party performs better, but views aren’t overwhelmingly positive. Young people are more likely to have a favorable than an unfavorable view of the Democratic Party by a 47% to 36% margin. But just 14% say they have a strongly favorable view of the Democrats.

Ohio Democrats See Edge if Trump Tells Agency Head You’re Fired’

Views of the Democratic Party are most favorable among young people of color. Roughly 6 in 10 blacks, Asians and Latinos hold positive views of the party. Young whites are somewhat more likely to have unfavorable than favorable views, 47 percent to 39 percent.

As for Trump, 8 in 10 young people think he is doing poorly in terms of the policies he’s put forward and 7 in 10 have negative views of his presidential demeanor.

“I do not like him as a person,” says Gallardo of Trump. She nonetheless voted for Trump because she didn’t trust Clinton. “I felt like there wasn’t much choice.”

Liberals Are Taking Aim At Their Own Party Post-Election

The poll of 1,833 adults age 18-30 was conducted Feb. 16 through March 6 using a sample drawn from the probability-based GenForward panel, which is designed to be representative of the U.S. young adult population. The margin of sampling error for all respondents is plus or minus 4 percentage points.

The survey was paid for by the Black Youth Project at the University of Chicago, using grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Ford Foundation.

Respondents were first selected randomly using address-based sampling methods, and later interviewed online or by phone.

This article was originally published on FORTUNE.com

The Bhagavad Gita (Unabridged) - Eknath Easwaran - translator | Religion & Spirituality ...

The Bhagavad Gita (Unabridged)
Eknath Easwaran - translator
Genre: Religion & Spirituality
Price: $3.95
Publish Date: February 6, 2015
Preview:

℗© 2015 Nilgiri Press at Blue Mountain Center of Meditation

@elfen-archer​ || continued ;;

“Ya know in my line of work that’s not exactly EASY to avoid.” Claire said, staring at him with a small look of HORROR.

“I don’t even know what a sternum is! Sounds like a stern mum…is it..something like that?” She doesn’t get how a stern mother cou-

Actually, thinking back to her OWN MOTHER. Yes, she could see how a stern mother could cause one’s heart to stop.

                                    🐰 [[[♠] ⅩℒⅠⅩ [♥]]] 🐰

❝  Stern mum?  ❞  Lavi parroted, humor accenting his voice. ❝  Not even close. The sternum is the bone in the center of your chest,  ❞ he pressed into the center of his own, since he didn’t exactly think jabbing a finger into her chest would be very appreciated.

❝  Feel that hard bone there? That’s the sternum. Its the piece that holds all yer ribs in place and connects ‘em. Its really bad if that gets broken. The force of a strong impact can stop the rhythm of your heartbeat in its tracks if it breaks and compresses inward.  ❞

How well can you hear in a noisy background? Try it here

NEW YORK — How well can you understand speech in a noisy setting?

Difficulty doing that is a hallmark of what’s called “hidden hearing loss.” Now, with the help of an exercise prepared for The Associated Press by the Mailman Center for Child Development at the University of Miami, you can give it a try.

Click here to try it. You will be asked to repeat a series of sentences. The exercise begins in quiet, but then it will introduce background noise. The noise comes in six levels, faint at first but eventually louder than the words.

People with hearing loss start to have some trouble understanding the words at the second or third level, according to Robert Fifer, director of audiology and speech pathology at the centre . That doesn’t mean that they can’t understand anything, but they show increasing difficulty understanding accurately what is said compared to someone with normal hearing abilities, he said.

The same appears to be true for people with normal scores on the standard hearing test called an audiogram, but who appear to have a loss of nerve connections associated with hidden hearing loss, he said.

Malcolm Ritter, The Associated Press

The Bhagavad Gita (Unabridged) - Eknath Easwaran - translator | Religion & Spirituality ...

The Bhagavad Gita (Unabridged)
Eknath Easwaran - translator
Genre: Religion & Spirituality
Price: $3.95
Publish Date: February 6, 2015
Preview:

℗© 2015 Nilgiri Press at Blue Mountain Center of Meditation

@perfectedrobin

Well, that hardly came as a shock. When dating a god of both mischief and lies, one swiftly gets used to last minute — or even beyond last minute — confessions and half-truths.

“Is this a life-threatening secret or an ‘I am about to make everything incredibly awkward please do not abandon me’ confession? With you, I always find that ‘important’ must be clearly defined, in each new situation that it is mentioned, as our definitions of the word regularly do not coincide.”

Loki nodded solemnly - so much so that even Thor turned his gaze to his brother to eye him curiously. “The most awkward of confessions. Life-changing. A confession that asks of lingerance.” The god said as he brought his hands up - and cupped them, so that the fingertips were curved, the heels were pressed together -

And the center vaguely looked like a heart.

“I love you!” And Loki was now grinning impishly. He gave Damian a wink as Thor; now exasperated with his brother, grabbed Loki and dragged him closer. “We will return shortly.” The thunderer said and they disappeared with a puff of green. 

Poll: Divided Americans Fret Country Losing Identity

By Matt Sedensky, AP, March 5, 2017

NEW YORK (AP)–Add one more to the list of things dividing left and right in this country: We can’t even agree what it means to be an American.

A new survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds Republicans are far more likely to cite a culture grounded in Christian beliefs and the traditions of early European immigrants as essential to U.S. identity.

Democrats are more apt to point to the country’s history of mixing of people from around the globe and a tradition of offering refuge to the persecuted.

While there’s disagreement on what makes up the American identity, 7 in 10 people–regardless of party–say the country is losing that identity.

“It’s such stark divisions,” said Lynele Jones, a 65-year-old accountant in Boulder, Colorado. Like many Democrats, Jones pointed to diversity and openness to refugees and other immigrants as central components of being American.

“There’s so much turmoil in the American political situation right now. People’s ideas of what is America’s place in the world are so different from one end of the spectrum to the other,” Jones said.

There are some points of resounding agreement among Democrats, Republicans and independents about what makes up the country’s identity. Among them: a fair judicial system and rule of law, the freedoms enshrined in the Constitution, and the ability to get good jobs and achieve the American dream.

Big gulfs emerged between the left and right on other characteristics seen as inherent to America.

About 65 percent of Democrats said a mix of global cultures was extremely or very important to American identity, compared with 35 percent of Republicans. Twenty-nine percent of Democrats saw Christianity as that important, compared with 57 percent of Republicans.

Democrats are far more likely than Republicans to say that the ability of people to come to escape violence and persecution is very important, 74 percent to 55 percent. Also, 25 percent of Democrats said the culture of the country’s early European immigrants very important, versus 46 percent of Republicans.

Reggie Lawrence, a 44-year-old Republican in Midland, Texas, who runs a business servicing oil fields, said the country and the Constitution were shaped by Christian values. As those slip away, he said, so does the structure of families, and ultimately, the country’s identity.

Patrick Miller, a political science professor at the University of Kansas who studies partisanship and polling, said the results reflect long-standing differences in the U.S. between one camp’s desire for openness and diversity and another’s vision of the country grounded in the white, English-speaking, Protestant traditions of its early settlers.

Those factions have seen their competing visions of American identity brought to a boil at points throughout history, such as when lawmakers barred Chinese immigration beginning in the 1880s or when bias against Catholic immigrants and their descendants bubbled up through a long stretch of the 20th century.

The starkness of the divide and the continuing questions over what it means to be American are a natural byproduct, Miller said, not just of U.S. history, but the current political climate and the rancor of today’s debates over immigration and the welcoming of refugees.

“Our sense of identity is almost inseparable from the subject of immigration because it’s how we were built,” he said. “Given what we are and how we’ve come about, it’s a very natural debate.”

The poll found Democrats were nearly three times as likely as Republicans to say that the U.S. should be a country made up of many cultures and values that change as new people arrive, with far more Republicans saying there should be an essential American culture that immigrants adopt.

Republicans overwhelmingly viewed immigrants who arrived in the past decade as having retained their own cultures and values rather than adopting American ones.

Among the areas seen as the greatest threats to the American way of life, Democrats coalesce around a fear of the country’s political leaders, political polarization and economic inequality. Most Republicans point instead to illegal immigration as a top concern.

Two questions, also posed during the presidential campaign, offered insight into how Trump’s election may have changed partisans’ views. The poll found about 52 percent of Republicans now regard the U.S. as the single greatest country in the world, up significantly from 35 percent when the question was asked last June.

Some 22 percent of Democrats expressed that view, essentially unchanged from the earlier poll.

Democrats appear to be reinforcing their belief that the country’s range of races, religions and backgrounds make the country stronger. About 80 percent made that assessment in the new poll, compared with 68 percent eight months earlier.

About 51 percent of Republicans held that view, similar to the percentage who said so in the previous poll.

AP-NORC poll: Political divide over American identity

External image

Politics

AP-NORC poll: Political divide over American identity

Add one more to the list of things dividing left and right in this country: We can’t even agree what it means to be an American. A new survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds Republicans are far more likely to cite a culture grounded in Christian beliefs and the traditions of early European immigrants as essential to U.S. identity. Democrats are more apt to point to the country’s history of mixing of people from around the globe and a tradition of offering refuge to the persecuted. While there’s disagreement on what makes up the American identity, 7 in 10 people — regardless of party — say the country is losing that identity.

Patrick Miller, a political science professor at the University of Kansas who studies partisanship and polling, said the results reflect long-standing differences in the U.S. between one camp’s desire for openness and diversity and another’s vision of the country grounded in the white, English-speaking, Protestant traditions of its early settlers. Those factions have seen their competing visions of American identity brought to a boil at points throughout history, such as when lawmakers barred Chinese immigration beginning in the 1880s or when bias against Catholic immigrants and their descendants bubbled up through a long stretch of the 20th century. The starkness of the divide and the continuing questions over what it means to be American are a natural byproduct, Miller said, not just of U.S. history, but the current political climate and the rancor of today’s debates over immigration and the welcoming of refugees.

Reylo - “Interstitial Spaces”

I blame @cobwebbing for giving me feels and writing smut that made me sad.

A kind of sequel-ish thing. Kind of nsfw?


He feels her crying on the other side of the base without meaning to. 

He slips in through the link of the bond. Her mind is a mess, a tangled clutter of anger, desire, and self-loathing. It presses upon him so thickly that it’s hard to maneuver in the space and he finds himself dodging emotions and memories almost constantly. 

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yarnfulofhair  asked:

"That went well."

Meme Mun Too Lazy To Find

@yarnfulofhair

There was a moment’s pause from the queen, brow pressing together at the center as eyes narrowed ever so slightly before she glanced at the other. It wasn’t a so much of an accusatory glare, but rather an expression that reflected the turning gears within her mind. Jessie had always been a bit more optimistic than herself, but in all honesty, Elsa wasn’t sure whether she was attempting to do just that, or if she was simply being sarcastic in her remark.

From whose perspective would that even qualify as having ‘went well’?”