presidential-elections-2016

This is your daily reminder that this is not normal. Donald Trump is unqualified, racist, misogynistic, ill-tempered, unintelligent; he has no grasp of how our government is supposed to work; he has conflicts of interest so numerous that two presidential ethics lawyers have bi-partisanly teamed up to combat them; he’s been sued so many times I can’t list them all here; he’s still being sued by a multitude of people, and will continue to be long into his presidency.

The Russian government blatantly interfered with his election through email hacks and wikileaks: this has been confirmed by multiple national intelligence agencies; he has no regard for the truth, or facts, or scientific data; he gets into fights with people on twitter at  3am.

He called Mexicans rapists and criminals; he wanted to create a registry for Muslim Americans; he doesn’t take no for an answer, whether its coming from a woman or the President of Mexico; he refuses to attend security briefings; he’s costing the government millions by refusing to leave his office in Trump Tower; his cabinet is as unqualified and uninformed as he is.

He lost the popular vote by over three million (3,000,000) people.  The American people did not elect him.  Donald Trump should not be President of the United States.

This is not normal. Don’t ever forget it.

Source

The ugly history of ‘Lügenpresse,’ a Nazi slur shouted at a Trump rally

ALSO:

Alt-right leader: ‘Hail Trump! Hail our people! Hail victory!’

“Spencer bashed journalists covering the 2016 presidential election, too. “One wonders if these people are people at all, or instead soulless golem,” Spencer said in a reference to a Jewish fable in a portion of his speech dedicated to criticizing both the media and Jews.He also used a Nazi-era propaganda term meaning “lying press” to describe reporters, citing “the mainstream media – or perhaps we should refer to them in the original German, lugenpresse.”

COUNTERPOINT:

I’d like to take a moment to reflect on one of this countries finest and purest moments.

Trump can spread descrimination and he can even pass anti-LGBTQ legislation but he CANNOT wipe our victory from the slate or void all that we stand for.

History will remember. We will remember. Love will always trump hate. United we stand.

These two maps show the exact same thing - results of the 2016 presidential election in the lower United States. The upper map seems dire to people like me, who believe Donald Trump is a bad person in general and a horrible person for this most important office in the world. It looks like almost the entire nation choose Trump over other candidates. 

However, if you look at the lower map, things change a bit. Blue color is more present and although some places seem clearly red, others are more mixed. This is because circles, which represent counties, were scaled to total number of votes casted in a given county rather than geographical area of such county (as in the upper map). 

Nevertheless, Donald Trump won, even though more people voted for Hillary Clinton. This is because of a very strange U.S. presidential election system, where there is an intermediate body between popular vote results and election results - the electoral college. In effect, even though difference in votes in key states such as Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin was very slim, Trump got all electoral votes from those states. This electoral college system is also why third-party candidates rarely get much attention - people fear if they vote for a third party candidate, they risk the candidate they strongly oppose could win. 

As a person living in Europe, I find it surprising that the Americans have not changed their system to be up with times. Even if they want the electoral college to stay, there is still a matter of second turn. In Poland and many other democracies, presidential elections are often unresolved in first turn because no candidate has gained more than 50% of all votes. A second turn is then called, in which two candidates who got most votes in first turn can compete. 

It’s best to explain it on an example. Suppose you have 100 voters and three candidates. Candidate A got 32 votes, candidate B got 33 votes and candidate C got 35 votes. In the U.S., candidate C wins even though 65% of voters did not for this candidate! In Poland or France, since no candidate got 50%+1 of all votes, candidates B and C are invited to second turn. It might happen that candidates A and B had similar views and candidate C is someone like Trump. So in second turn, all candidate A voters casted their vote to candidate B and that candidate won with 65% of the vote. Clearly more democratic than the American system in my opinion.  

The Trump Standard

What did Trump say when confronted with proof that his son jumped at the prospect of meeting with a “Russian government attorney” offering to dish dirt on Hillary Clinton as “part of Russia and its government’s support” for his candidacy?

Trump said: “many people would have held that meeting.” 

The next day, Trump revised “many” to “most,” saying: “I think from a practical standpoint, most people would have taken that meeting. . . . Politics isn’t the nicest business in the world, but it’s very standard.”

It’s true that politics isn’t the nicest business in the world. I’ve been there. Real estate development isn’t the nicest business in the world either, for all I know. But breaking the law and flirting with treason isn’t standard practice in either realm.  

Much ink has been spilled over the last six months documenting Trump’s tin ear when it comes to all matters ethical: His refusal to put his business into a blind trust, as every one of his predecessors in recent memory has done. His refusal to reveal his tax returns, like his predecessors. The never-ending stream of lies that he continues to spew even after they’re proven to be lies (three to five million fraudulent votes, Obama spied on me, fake news, and so on).  

None of this is “very standard” for presidents. It’s the opposite of standard.

I think we’ve been missing the boat by characterizing these as ethical breaches. Ethics assumes some sort of agreed-upon standard against which an ethical breach can be defined and measured.

But Donald Trump doesn’t live in a world that has any standards at all, and he never has. His entire approach to life, to business, and now to the presidency has nothing whatever to do with standards. It’s about winning, at all costs. Whatever it takes.

Winning at all costs is the only thing that’s standard in Trumpworld.

When he was in business and couldn’t repay his creditors, he declared bankruptcy. Again and again. And when his bankers finally wised up and refused to lend him any more money, he found foreign bankers who would oblige.

When he could have chosen to pay his contractors, or others who worked for him, he didn’t. He stiffed them.

Trump has spent most of his life in business being sued or sueing – as if our judicial system was just another standard tool for winning.

To make a name for himself in politics, he suggested Barack Obama wasn’t born in America. Hey, whatever it took.

To win the presidency he told lies about undocumented immigrants and crime, about Arabs cheering as the World Trade Center went down, about  his business smarts. He promised his followers he’d jail Hillary Clinton, drain the Washington swamp, build a wall along the Mexican border, create vast numbers of jobs, repeal the North American Free Trade Act.

He’d lie about anything. He’d promise anything. All was just a means to becoming president. There are no standards. Whatever it took.

“I could stand in the middle of 5th Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters,” he said.

Did he collude with Russia to become president? That wouldn’t be standard practice in politics, but it would be consistent with Trump’s standard.

“I said [to Putin] ‘Did you do it?’” Trump reported back on his meeting with Vladimir. “And he said, ‘No, I did not. Absolutely not.’ I then asked him a second time in a totally different way. He said absolutely not.”

And that’s supposed to be the end of it? 

The  U.S. intelligence community has told Trump that Russia interfered on his behalf in the presidential election of 2016, at Putin’s direction. So why does Trump ask Putin if he did it? 

He should be telling Putin what the United States is planning to do in response to what Putin did.

We may never know the exact answer to whether Trump himself colluded with Putin to win the presidency. Or, more likely, his core supporters may never know, because Trump will tell them not to believe whatever Special Counsel Robert Mueller and the intelligence agencies come up with, and to blame the press for reporting fake news. Politics isn’t the nicest business in the world, he might say, but whatever he did was very standard.

A president’s major responsibilities are to protect the United States and the Constitution, and to see that the laws are faithfully executed.

But Trump’s major goal now is to remain in power and to accumulate even more money. Whatever it takes.

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50 Writing Prompts

1. Do you worry more about people judging your mind or body?
2. Does the power lay with the sword or the pen?
3. Describe a mouth without using any anatomical words (teeth, lips, tongue, etc.).
4. What have you accomplished this year?
5. Make a playlist of songs that remind you of one person, title it with their name.
6. What’s a broken heart?
7. Write a journal entry to someone who has come back into your life after hurting you.
8. Do you like the age you’re at?
9. Do last words hold a greatly significant meaning?
10. How does age affect/ limit you?
11. Do you think you’d better parent a girl or a boy?
12. What is the longest period of time you have had a crush on someone?
13. Do you believe in auras?
14. Is religion by nature repressive?
15. Do you need organized religion for spiritual enlightenment?
16. What’s the different between being religious and being spiritual?
17. Is there a special reason why your parents named you what they did?
18. Who demands the most perfection from you?
19. Would you rather be able to fly or teleport?
20. Is your heritage important to you?
21. What is one gift you would like that costs under ten dollars?
22. How many times a day do you lie?
23. Do you think someone’s piercings and hair color should affect their chances of being hired for a job?
24. What judgements do you make about people who have dyed hair and facial piercings?
25. Do you seek pain?
26. Describe your bed and sheets.
27. Are bigger houses better?
28. Make a playlist dedicated to a paternal figure in your life.
29. Do you think your horoscopes are accurate?
30. Talk about people in your life who you consider close but have the habit of sabotaging you.
31. Who is the most frustrating person in your life?
32. Do you pray?
33. Make a list of words that don’t sound appealing.
34. Describe a sound that bothers you? For example, the scratching of a chalkboard.
35. Do you consider your area to be affluent?
36. How has your home life affect your school life?
37. When’s the last time you were in nature?
38. Create a list of words to describe how you feel about the 2016 presidential election.
39. Write a haiku.
40. Will some people never be happy?
41. Is loneliness a mental state of mind or physical state of being?
42. What is one secret that you’re keeping for someone else?
43. What is one secret you are keeping for yourself?
44. Do you find keeping secrets to be easy?
45. Why is it hard to be honest?
46. Can you fall asleep in cars?
47. Is physical touch important to find comfort?
48. What did you do last Friday?
49. Is writing a cathartic process for you?
50. What is the last movie you cried watching?
-cjf