president shimon peres

politico.com
Obama aides, full of emotion, get ready to turn out the lights
"It doesn't fully hit you that it's over," said one recently departed alum. By SARAH WHEATON

This week, President Barack Obama’s White House aides have been getting their last taste of Chocolate Freedom.

The molten fudge confection (with fro-yo a la mode) is the signature dessert at the White House restaurant known as the mess, and it’s been a must-order item at last meals there for the hundreds of Obama-appointed staffers who need to be out the door before Friday. The marble halls of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building echo with the sounds of colleagues exchanging personal Gmail addresses. Gigantic boxes haphazardly filled with computer monitors are scattered around the corridors.

They always knew the end was coming. But that doesn’t make it feel any less abrupt for the dedicated staff who will suddenly no longer have every waking moment consumed by one man and one mission. They’ll no longer be on guard for how any development, anywhere in the world, might require Obama’s and therefore their own response.

“In the moment, a week of 18-hour days can feel like an eternity,” said Charlie Anderson, who spent most of the past 10 years working for Obama. “In retrospect, it all just compresses.”

Read more here

“The last of the founding generation is now gone.  Shimon accomplished enough things in his life for a thousand men.  But he understood that it is better to live to the very end of his time on Earth with a longing not for the past but for the dreams that have not yet come true – an Israel that is secure in a just and lasting peace with its neighbors. And so now this work is in the hand of Israel’s next generation, in the hands of Israel’s next generation and its friends.” —President Obama at the memorial service for Shimon Peres at Mount Herzl

Statement by the President on the Death of Former Israeli President Shimon Peres

There are few people who we share this world with who change the course of human history, not just through their role in human events, but because they expand our moral imagination and force us to expect more of ourselves. My friend Shimon was one of those people.

Shimon Peres once said that, “I learned that public service is a privilege that must be based on moral foundations.” Tonight, Michelle and I join people across Israel, the United States and around the world in honoring the extraordinary life of our dear friend Shimon Peres—a Founding Father of the State of Israel and a statesman whose commitment to Israel’s security and pursuit of peace was rooted in his own unshakeable moral foundation and unflagging optimism.

I will always be grateful that I was able to call Shimon my friend.  I first visited him in Jerusalem when I was a senator, and when I asked for his advice, he told me that while people often say that the future belongs to the young, it’s the present that really belongs to the young. “Leave the future to me,” he said, “I have time.”  And he was right.  Whether it was during our conversations in the Oval Office, walking together through Yad Vashem, or when I presented him with America’s highest civilian honor, the Medal of Freedom, Shimon always looked to the future.   He was guided by a vision of the human dignity and progress that he knew people of goodwill could advance together.  He brought young people from around the world together because he knew they could carry us closer to our ideals of justice and equality.

Shimon was the essence of Israel itself—the courage of Israel’s fight for independence, the optimism he shared with his wife Sonya as they helped make the desert bloom, and the perseverance that led him to serve his nation in virtually every position in government across the entire life of the State of Israel.   As Americans, we are in his debt because, having worked with every U.S. president since John F. Kennedy, no one did more over so many years as Shimon Peres to build the alliance between our two countries—an unbreakable alliance that today is closer and stronger than it has ever been.

Perhaps because he had seen Israel surmount overwhelming odds, Shimon never gave up on the possibility of peace between Israelis, Palestinians and Israel’s neighbors—not even after the heartbreak of the night in Tel Aviv that took Yitzhak Rabin.  “Dear friends,” he told us during my visit to Israel three years ago, “after everything I have seen in my life, I earned the right to believe that peace is attainable.”  Tonight, I can think of no greater tribute to his life than to renew our commitment to the peace that we know is possible.   Our thoughts are with his children Zvia, Yoni and Chemi, their families and all who loved and admired Shimon Peres, of blessed memory.

A light has gone out, but the hope he gave us will burn forever. Shimon Peres was a soldier for Israel, for the Jewish people, for justice, for peace, and for the belief that we can be true to our best selves - to the very end of our time on Earth, and in the legacy that we leave to others. For the gift of his friendship and the example of his leadership, todah rabah, Shimon.

This grotesque encounter is what you get when Israeli colonialism, apartheid, & ethnic cleansing try to feign association with progressive social movements like feminism. British model Naomi Campbell does the obligatory photo op with former paramilitary terrorist & past Israeli president Shimon Peres after he presented her an award at an event commemorating International Women’s Day today at the Peres Center for Peace in Jaffa, Israel.

Actually, given her nearly 20-year rap sheet of anger management issues toward female subordinates, she may be the most appropriate candidate for that award from Peres who has his own rap sheet as a terrorist against Palestinians.

Going back to 1998, she has been sued, served community service, & pleaded guilty to charges by women maids & assistants umpteen times for violence & verbal & physical abuse against them including: several assaults with telephones; threats to throw one out of a moving car onto a busy highway; head-butting one & slamming another against a wall; grabbing one by the neck & violently shaking her head; biting one on the lip & yanking her to the ground by her hair while screaming “You f*****g worthless bitch”; slapping one & beating her on the head with a Blackberry.

She has also assaulted an actress, her drug counselor, & kicked & spit at police at Heathrow after going berserk on a plane.

In 2010, Hague prosecutors, in a case against former Liberian president Charles Taylor for war crimes, claimed Taylor delivered “blood diamonds” to Campbell after a 1997 dinner at Nelson Mandela’s home. Beside her violence, that may be her primary connection to Israel since it is up to its eyeballs in the blood diamond trade.

Blood diamonds (also known as conflict diamonds) are diamonds mined in a war zone, particularly in African countries. They are a plundered natural resource & at the expense of African working people in several countries–most notably the DR Congo. At this time, all diamonds, without exception, are considered blood diamonds by human rights groups & activists though the industry has attempted through a scheme called the Kimberley Process to circumvent scrutiny & continue trading in African blood.

Campbell deserves this honorific for women’s rights about as much as Peres does for peace when he is one of the chief architects of Israeli apartheid & ethnic cleansing.

Use your outrage & visceral disgust to build the economic & cultural boycott of Israel (BDS). Buy nothing beginning with barcode 729.

(Photo by Amir Cohen/Reuters)

Former Israeli prime minister Shimon Peres dies at 93; remembering the Nobel Peace Prize laureate through photos

Former Israeli prime minister and president Shimon Peres died on Tuesday, September 27. He was 93. Even though he suffered a massive stroke about two weeks ago, Shimon’s health condition had shown improvement for a brief period before worsening on Tuesday.

 Shimon was one of the defining figures of Israel’s political scene and although he had never ushered a party to election victory, he held important public offices. Born on August 2 1923 in Poland to a lumber merchant, Shimon moved to Tel Aviv a decade later. There, he attended the agricultural school and later joined a commune, kick-starting a flourishing career in politics.

He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1994 for being one of the key designers of Oslo Accords, which was one of the first peace agreements between Israelis and the Palestinians. Shimon shares the honour with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

So the Vatican officially recognized a bantu state for Palestine. Whoopdidoo! Now what? The Vatican has 67 years of equivocations about Palestinian justice. This must be another one of those symbolic things Palestinians are expected to rejoice about–like the pope saying a Hail Mary at the apartheid wall. Symbolic is another word for empty gesture.
Israel is reportedly disappointed. But not as disappointed as Palestinian supporters when Pope Francis refused to denounce Operation Ethnic Cleansing last summer & held a public smooch-fest with then Israeli president Shimon Peres.
These bantustate recognitions are a political scam. If the Vatican comes out for BDS, now we’re talking. Now we’re getting somewhere. Save the empty gestures.
—  by Mary Scully