president selina

16 Series That You Probably Aren’t Watching, But Should

Fargo - For those who appreciate crime dramas with a darker bent, FX’s well-crafted series based on the movie of the same name is worth a long look. The tone of the series is similar to that of the film, but the show has separated itself with more plot and terrific acting, especially Billy Bob Thornton, who is turning his Lorne Malvo into one of the most memorable characters of the year. The series also features Martin Freeman (of “The Hobbit” and “Sherlock” fame), Allison Tolman and Colin Hanks. Really, the entire cast is great.

Louie - Straight and (mostly) unfiltered from the mind of Louis C.K., this half hour comedy on FX follows the comedian as he plays an especially schlubby version of himself. (Or maybe that’s the real Louis C.K.) The closest comparison I can think of is Larry David’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” though Louis has a different brand of humor. The fourth season debuted this month. I have to say — I’m jealous of anyone who hasn’t yet started to binge-watch this show.

Justified - Based on a story by Elmore Leonard, who is one of my favorite authors, and starring Tim Olyphant, who was excellent in “Deadwood,” it’s no surprise that this FX show is near and dear to my heart. Olyphant plays Raylan Givens, a smooth-talking U.S. Marshal based near his hometown of Harlan. He has a complicated relationship with an old friend, Boyd Crowder (played brilliantly by Walton Goggins), which drives the show. It has been renewed for a sixth and final season.

The Americans - Yet another quality show airing on FX, this is a period drama set during the Reagan-era Cold War. It follows two Russian spies living in America and the FBI agent who is trying to stop them. It’s not always clear who you’re supposed to be rooting for, as there are plenty of flaws and misdeeds to go around.

Sherlock - Haven’t yet checked out this BBC import starting Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman as a modern day Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson? What are you waiting for?

The Newsroom - People seem to either love or hate this Aaron Sorkin-led series, though if you liked The West Wing, it’s worth checking out.

Hannibal - Just renewed for its third season (on NBC), the series is a prequel of sorts to “Silence of the Lambs,” starring Hannibal Lecter as an as-yet discovered cannibal with a penchant for hosting dinner parties. Warning: this is not for the faint of heart — the imagery and violence is extremely graphic.

Sleepy Hollow - This series is so crazy that it actually works. Ichabod Crane comes back to life in modern day Sleepy Hollow, and with the help of a spunky local police detective, he has to save the world. It has sort of an “X-Files” vibe to it, only with more headless horsemen.

Treme - This HBO series just called it a wrap after four seasons. From David Simon, the creator of “The Wire,” it’s set in the colorful and vibrant Treme district in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. It isn’t a crime drama per say, though there is crime and there is drama. There are a lot of laughs and tears as well.

Ray Donovan - The titular character (played by Liev Schreiber) is something of a fixer for a Los Angeles law firm. He’s an anti-hero with a good heart and a family that can’t seem to stay out of trouble. The second season begins soon on Showtime.

Orphan Black - This Canadian import is in its second season and airs on BBC America. It follows a ne’er-do-well who discovers that she’s a clone. Tatiana Maslany is a revelation in the lead role(s) — it’s amazing how she’s able to make each one of her multiple characters so distinct. I gave up on the series midway through the first season — too much to watch at the time — but picked it back up and I’m glad I did.

Broad City - The first season just wrapped up on Comedy Central. It stars Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson and credits Amy Poehler as an executive producer. This series follows Ilana and Abbi as they live (and sometimes work) in the Big Apple — it’s sort of a more outrageous version of “Girls,” but funnier. Jacobson has comedy chops in her own right, but she generally plays it mostly straight (or is it sane?), while Glazer’s hijinks get the girls into all sorts of strange situations. One of my favorite comedians — Hannibal Buress — is a series regular.

It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia - Airing on FXX, this series has been aptly described as “Friends” on crack. The first season is a bit uneven, but the series really hits its stride once Danny DeVito joins the cast. I still think that the the final episode in the fourth season — “The Nightman Cometh” — is one of the funniest half hours I’ve ever seen.

Veep - This hilarious HBO series starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Vice President Selina Meyer is in the midst of its third season. The writing is sharp and the ensemble cast is terrific.

Archer - Just wrapping up its 5th season on FX, this crass (but witty) animated series follows the antics of a spy organization. The recent season (“Archer Vice”) was perhaps its best yet.

Rectify - The second season of this Southern Gothic begins in June on SundanceTV. It follows an ex-con who was released on DNA evidence after being convicted of the rape and murder of his then 16-year-old girlfriend. It has a deliberate pace, but it’s a well-crafted show.

A few more recommendations: Banshee, Bates Motel, Borgen, Luther and Masters of Sex

10

73rd Golden Globe Awards Nominees

FILM

BEST MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA

  • Carol
  • Mad Max: Fury Road
  • The Revenant
  • Room
  • Spotlight

BEST MOTION PICTURE - MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • The Big Short
  • Joy
  • The Martian
  • Spy
  • Trainwreck

BEST DIRECTOR

  • Todd Haynes – Carol
  • Alejandro González Iñárritu – The Revenant
  • Tom McCarthy – Spotlight
  • George Miller – Mad Max: Fury Road
  • Ridley Scott – The Martian

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - DRAMA

  • Bryan Cranston – Trumbo as Dalton Trumbo
  • Leonardo DiCaprio – The Revenant as Hugh Glass
  • Michael Fassbender – Steve Jobs as Steve Jobs
  • Eddie Redmayne – The Danish Girl as Lili Elbe / Einar Wegener
  • Will Smith – Concussion as Dr. Bennet Omalu

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE -
DRAMA

  • Cate Blanchett – Carol as Carol Aird
  • Brie Larson – Room as Joy “Ma” Newsome
  • Rooney Mara – Carol as Therese Belivet
  • Saoirse Ronan – Brooklyn as Eilis Lacey
  • Alicia Vikander – The Danish Girl as Gerda Wegener

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL

  • Christian Bale – The Big Short as Michael Burry
  • Steve Carell – The Big Short as Mark Baum
  • Matt Damon – The Martian as Mark Watney
  • Al Pacino – Danny Collins as Danny Collins
  • Mark Ruffalo – Infinitely Polar Bear as Cam Stuart

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE - COMEDY OR MUSICAL

  • Jennifer Lawrence – Joy as Joy Mangano
  • Melissa McCarthy – Spy as Susan Cooper / Carol Jenkins / Penny Morgan
  • Amy Schumer – Trainwreck as Amy Townsend
  • Maggie Smith – The Lady in the Van as Miss Mary Shepherd / Margaret Fairchild
  • Lily Tomlin – Grandma as Elle Reid

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY MOTION PICTURE

  • Paul Dano – Love & Mercy as young Brian Wilson
  • Idris Elba – Beasts of No Nation as Commandant
  • Mark Rylance – Bridge of Spies as Rudolf Abel
  • Michael Shannon – 99 Homes as Rick Carver
  • Sylvester Stallone – Creed as Rocky Balboa

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN ANY MOTION PICTURE

  • Jane Fonda – Youth as Brenda Morel
  • Jennifer Jason Leigh – The Hateful Eight as Daisy Domergue
  • Helen Mirren – Trumbo as Hedda Hopper
  • Alicia Vikander – Ex Machina as Ava
  • Kate Winslet – Steve Jobs as Joanna Hoffman

BEST SCREENPLAY

  • Emma Donoghue – Room
  • Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer – Spotlight
  • Charles Randolph and Adam McKay – The Big Short
  • Aaron Sorkin – Steve Jobs
  • Quentin Tarantino – The Hateful Eight

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

  • Carter Burwell – Carol
  • Alexandre Desplat – The Danish Girl
  • Ennio Morricone – The Hateful Eight
  • Daniel Pemberton – Steve Jobs
  • Ryuichi Sakamoto, Alva Noto – The Revenant

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

  • “Love Me like You Do” (Max Martin, Savan Kotecha, Ali Payami, Tove Lo, Ilya Salmanzadeh) – Fifty Shades of Grey
  • “One Kind of Love” (Brian Wilson, Scott Bennett) – Love & Mercy
  • “See You Again” (DJ Frank E, Andrew Cedar, Charlie Puth, Wiz Khalifa) – Furious 7
  • “Simple Song #3” (David Lang) – Youth
  • “Writing’s on the Wall” (Sam Smith, Jimmy Napes) – Spectre

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

  • Anomalisa
  • The Good Dinosaur
  • Inside Out
  • The Peanuts Movie
  • Shaun the Sheep Movie

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

  • The Brand New Testament (Belgium/France/Luxembourg)
  • The Club (Chile)
  • The Fencer (Finland/Germany/Estonia)
  • Mustang (France)
  • Son of Saul (Hungary)

TELEVISION

BEST TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA

  • Empire
  • Game of Thrones
  • Mr. Robot
  • Narcos
  • Outlander

BEST TELEVISION SERIES - MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Casual
  • Mozart in the Jungle
  • Orange is the New Black
  • Silicon Valley
  • Transparent
  • Veep

BEST TELEVISION LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • American Crime
  • American Horror Story: Hotel
  • Fargo
  • Flesh and Bone
  • Wolf Hall

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA

  • Jon Hamm – Mad Men as Don Draper
  • Rami Malek – Mr. Robot as Elliot Alderson
  • Wagner Moura – Narcos as Pablo Escobar
  • Bob Odenkirk – Better Call Saul as James Morgan “Jimmy” McGill
  • Liev Schreiber – Ray Donovan as Ray Donovan

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES - DRAMA

  • Caitriona Balfe – Outlander as Claire Fraser
  • Viola Davis – How to Get Away with Murder as Prof. Annalise Keating, J.D.
  • Eva Green – Penny Dreadful as Vanessa Ives
  • Taraji P. Henson – Empire as Loretha “Cookie” Lyon
  • Robin Wright – House of Cards as Claire Underwood

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES - MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Aziz Ansari – Master of None as Dev Shah
  • Gael García Bernal – Mozart in the Jungle as Rodrigo de Souza
  • Rob Lowe – The Grinder as Dean Sanderson, Jr.
  • Patrick Stewart – Blunt Talk as Walter Blunt
  • Jeffrey Tambor – Transparent as Maura Pfefferman

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES - MUSICAL OR COMEDY

  • Rachel Bloom – Crazy Ex-Girlfriend as Rebecca Bunch
  • Jamie Lee Curtis – Scream Queens as Dean Cathy Munsch
  • Julia Louis-Dreyfus – Veep as President Selina Meyer
  • Gina Rodriguez – Jane the Virgin as Jane Gloriana Villanueva
  • Lily Tomlin – Grace and Frankie as Frankie Bergstein

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Idris Elba – Luther as DCI John Luther
  • Oscar Isaac – Show Me a Hero as Nick Wasicsko
  • David Oyelowo – Nightingale as Peter Snowden
  • Mark Rylance – Wolf Hall as Thomas Cromwell
  • Patrick Wilson – Fargo as State Trooper Lou Solverson

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LIMITED SERIES OR A MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Kirsten Dunst – Fargo as Peggy Blomquist
  • Lady Gaga – American Horror Story: Hotel as Elizabeth Johnson / The Countess
  • Sarah Hay – Flesh and Bone as Claire Robbins
  • Felicity Huffman – American Crime as Barbara “Barb” Hanlon
  • Queen Latifah – Bessie as Bessie Smith

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Alan Cumming – The Good Wife as Eli Gold
  • Damian Lewis – Wolf Hall as King Henry VIII
  • Ben Mendelsohn – Bloodline as Danny Rayburn
  • Tobias Menzies – Outlander as Frank Randall/Jonathan “Black Jack” Randall
  • Christian Slater – Mr. Robot as Mr. Robot

BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, LIMITED SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

  • Uzo Aduba – Orange Is the New Black as Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren
  • Joanne Froggatt – Downton Abbey as Anna Bates
  • Regina King – American Crime as Aliyah Shadeed
  • Judith Light – Transparent as Shelly Pfefferman
  • Maura Tierney – The Affair as Helen Solloway