preserving a husband

  • what she says: im fine
  • what she means: I will never get over the reveal that Eliza is the one who keeps on telling the story. That she went on to live another 50 years and in those 50 years she went on to preserve not only her husband's legacy, but Washington's, Lafayette's, Laurens', and Mulligan's legacies as well. And not only that, but she actively spoke out against slavery and founded the first New York City private orphanage. Eliza Hamilton did so much and still wished she could have more time. Don't look at me I can't handle anything right now.
Did you know many of the words in the English language come from The Old Norse language?

Did you know that “cake”, “egg”, “fellow”, “gun”, “happy”, “husband” and many other words used in the English vocabulary is of Old Norse origin? The reason is the Viking colonization of eastern and northern England between 850 and 1100 AD. The Vikings quickly assimilated and brought with them an important gift: The rich and powerful Old Norse language.

Old Norse diverged into West Norse (Norway, Faroe Islands, Iceland, and Greenland) and East Norse (Denmark and Sweden). With some minor regional variations in loan words, both West Norse and East Norse are essentially the same. The Vikings who raided and later settled in Great Britain came mainly from Norway and Denmark.

Below you will find an alphabetical list of many common English words of Old Norse origin.

A

aloft – á (“=in, on, to”) + lopt (“=air, atmosphere, sky, heaven, upper floor, loft”)

anger – angr (“=trouble, affliction”); root ang (=”strait, straitened, troubled”); related to anga, plural öngur (=”straits, anguish”)

awe – agi (“=terror”)

are – merger of Old English (earun, earon) and Old Norse (er) cognates

awkward – the first element is from Old Norse öfugr (“=turned-backward”), the ‘-ward’ part is from Old English weard

axle – öxl (“=ox tree”)

B

bag

barn

bait

ball – bǫllr” (=”round object”)

band – band (=”rope”)

bark – bǫrkr

berserk – berserkr, lit. ‘bear-shirt’, (alt. berr-serkr, ‘bare-shirt’) frenzied warriors

birth – byrðr

bleak – bleikr (=”pale”)

blunder – blundra (=”shut one’s eye”)

both – baðir

bug – búkr (=”insect within tree trunks”)

bulk – bulki

bull – boli

bylaw – bylög (‘by’=village; ‘lög’=law; ‘village-law’)

C

cake – kaka (=”cake”)

call – kalla (=”cry loudly”)

cast – kasta (=”to throw”)

choose – kjósa (=”to choose”)

clip – klippa (=”to cut”)

club – klubba (=”cudgel”)

crawl – krafla (=”to claw”)

crook – krokr (=”hook-shaped instrument or weapon”)

cur – kurra (=”to growl”)

D

die – deyja (=”pass away”)

dirt – drit (=”feces”)

dregs – dregg (=”sediment”)

E

egg – egg (=”egg”)

F

fellow – felagi

fjord – fjǫrðr (= ”walk”, ”pass”, ”bring over to the other side”)

flat – flatr

flit – flytja (=”cause to fit”)

fog – from Old Norse fok through Danish fog, meaning “spray”, “shower”, “snowdrift”

freckle – freknur (=”freckles”)

G

gad – gaddr (=”rod, long stick”)

gap – gap (=”chasm”)

get – geta, gat (> got), gittan (> gotten)

geyser – from Icelandic geysir, from Old Norse geysa (=”to gush”)

gift – gift (=”dowry”)

girth – gjörð (=”circumference, cinch”)

give – gefa (=”to give”)

glitter – glitra (=”to glitter”)

gosling – gæslingr” (=”goose”)

guest – gestr (=”guest”)

gun – from Old Norse Gunnhildr (female name, both elements of the name, gunn and hildr, have the meaning “war, battle”)

gust – gustr

H

hail – heill (=”health, prosperity, good luck”)

happy – happ (=”chance, good luck, fate”)

heathen – heiðinn (=”not Christian or Jewish/ the word for an exclusively Christian idea, a person or society prior to Christianity.”)

Hell – may be in part from Old Norse Hel, the daughter of Loki and ruler of the underworld in Norse mythology.

hit – hitta (=”to find”)

how – haugr (=”barrow, small hill”) Usage preserved mainly in place names

husband – husbondi (=”master of the house”)

I

ill – illr (=”bad”)

K

keel – kjölr

kid – kið (=”young goat”)

kindle – kynda

knife – knifr

knot – knutr

L

lad – ladd (=”young man”)

law – lagu

leather – leðr

leg – leggr

likely – líkligr

link – hlenkr

litmus – litmose (=”lichen for dying”, lita =”to stain”)

loan – lán (=”to lend”)

loft – lopt (=”an upper room or floor : attic, air, sky”)

loose – lauss (=”loose/free”)

low – lagr

M

mire – myrr (=’bog’)

mistake – mistaka (=”miscarry”)

muck – myki (=”cow dung”)

mug – mugge

muggy – mugga (=”drizzle, mist”)

N

Norman, Normandy – from Old Norse through Old French, meaning “northman”, due to Viking settlement in Normandy region.

O

oaf – alfr (=”elf”)

odd – oddi (=”third number”, “the casting vote”)

Odin – Óðinn

Ombudsman – from Old Norse umboðsmaðr through Swedish ombudsman, meaning “commissary”, “representative”, “steward”

outlaw – utlagi

P
plough, plow – plogr

R

Ragnarok – “Doom of the gods” or “Destiny of the gods”, from Norse mythology. Composed of words ragna, genitive of “the great powers”(regin), and rǫk (later rök) “destiny, doom, fate, end”.

race – rás (=”to race”, “to run”, “to rush”, “to move swift”)

raft – raptr (=”log”)

raise – reisa

ransack – rannsaka (=”to search the house”)

reindeer – hreindyri

rid – rythja (=”to clear land”)

rive – rífa (=”to scratch, plow, tear”)

root – rót

rotten – rotinn (=”decayed”)

rugged – rogg (=”shaggy tuft”)

run – renna (=”to run”)

S

Saga – saga (=”story, tale”)

sale – sala

same – same, samr (=”same”)

scale – (for weighing) from skal (=”bowl, drinking cup”, or in plural “weighing scale” referring to the cup or pan part of a balance) in early English used to mean “cup”

scant – skamt & skammr (=”short, lacking”)

scare – skirra (=”to frighten)

scarf – skarfr (=”fastening joint”)

scathe – skaða (=”to hurt, injure”)

score – skor (=”notch”; “twenty”)

scrape – skrapa (=”to scrape, erase”)

scrap – skrap (=”scraps, trifles”) from skrapa

seat – sæti (=”seat, position”)

seem – sœma (=”to conform”)

shake – skaka (=”to shake”)

skate – skata (=”fish”)

skid – probably from or related to Old Norse skið (=”stick of wood”) and related to “ski” (=”stick of wood”, or in this sense “snowshoe”)

skill – skil (=”distinction”)

skin – skinn (=”animal hide”)

skip – skopa (=”to skip, run)

skirt – skyrta (=”shirt”)

skull – skulle (=”head”)

sky – ský (=”cloud”)

slant – sletta, slenta (=”to throw carelessly”)

slaughter – slahtr (=”butchering”)

slaver – slafra (=”slaver”)

sledge – sleggja (=”sledgehammer”)

sleight – slœgð

sleuth – sloð (=”trail”)

sly – sloegr (=”cunning, crafty, sly”)

snare – snara (=”noose, snare”)

snub – snubba (=”to curse”)

sprint – spretta (=”to jump up”)

stagger – stakra (=”to push”)

stain – steina (=”to paint”)

stammer – stemma (=”to hinder, damn up”)

steak – steik, steikja (=”to fry”)

sway – sveigja (=”to bend, swing, give way”)

T

take – taka

tarn – tjörn, tjarn

their – þierra

they – þeir

thorp – þorp

though – from Old English þēah, and in part from Old Norse þó (=”though”)

thrall – þræll

Thursday – Þorsdagr (=”Thor’s day”)

thrift – þrift (=”prosperity”)

thrust – þrysta (=”to thrust, force”)

thwart – þvert (=”across”)

tidings – tíðindi (=”news of events”)

tight – þéttr (=”watertight, close in texture, solid”)

till -til (=”to, until”)

troll – troll (=”giant, fiend, demon”; further etymology is disputed)

trust – traust (=”help, confidence”)

U

ugly – uggligr (=”dreadful”)

until – from Old Norse und (=”as far as, up to”) and til (=”until, up to”).

V

Vanadium – from Old Norse Vanadis, another name for Freja

Viking – viking, “one who came from the fjords

W

wand – vondr (=”rod”)

want – vanta (=”to lack”)

weak – veikr (=”weak, pliant”)

whirl – hvirfla (=”to go around”)

whisk – viska (=”to plait”)

wight – vigr (=”able in battle”) – the other wight meaning “man” is from Old English

wile – vél (=”trick, craft, fraud”)

window – vindauga (=”wind-eye”) – although gluggi was more commonly used in Old Norse

wing – vængr (=”a wing”)

wrong – rangr (=”crooked, wry, wrong”)

coololdsoulpoetlove  asked:

I understand. My school's graduation was Thursday. On the day of the senior walkout, I saw all the senior friends I had walk out my school's doors for the last time. I've had classes with them, done shows with them, laughed with them. Also, it seems like you're having an Eliza moment. I have felt and feel the same way. I don't know what the future will hold for me. I hope I accomplish everything I set out to do in life and that I will be missed when my time comes. I'm here if you want 2 talk. 💝

you said it perfectly. i’m just waiting for my eliza moment. 

i haven’t seen hamilton in person, but i know at the end, eliza takes this big breath as she’s looking out at the audience–like she’s realized she did enough/preserved her husband’s legacy. and i just can’t wait to have my eliza moment where i know i’ve done enough and i can just look back and smile.

OKAY KIDS EMBARRASSING STORY TIME

I KNEW A LOT OF FRENCH WHEN I MOVED TO FRANCE SO I WAS A FAIRLY CONFIDENT SPEAKER, BUT I STILL HAD TO LEARN THE HARD WAY THAT FRENCH-IFYING WORDS WILLY-NILLY DOES NOT  ALWAYS WORK. 

LET ME SET THE SCENE: THERE I WAS, SITTING AT A TABLE WITH A REALLY OLD-FASHIONED ADORABLE ELDERLY FRENCH COUPLE. VERY PRIM. VERY PROPER. WE WERE SMALL-TALKING OVER DINNER WHEN DANIÈLE ASKED THE FATEFUL QUESTION: 

WHAT DID I THINK OF FOOD IN FRANCE IN COMPARISON TO FOOD IN THE STATES?

WELL, I’LL TELL YOU, I LOVE FRENCH FOODS. THEY’RE ALL ABOUT MARKETS AND FRESH PRODUCE AND FRESHER EVERYTHING AND IT WAS A MAGICAL WHOLE NEW WORLD FOR ME, ALADDIN-STYLE. SO, I WENT AHEAD AND TOLD HER THAT I LOVE FRENCH FOOD, AND THAT I EVEN PREFER IT TO AMERICAN FOOD, BECAUSE UNLIKE AMERICAN FOOD, IT HAS FAR LESS PRÉSERVATIFS IN IT. 

WELL, PRESERVATIFS DOES NOT TRANSLATE TO PRESERVATIVES, FOLKS. 

DANIÈLE’S HUSBAND, PIERRE, WAS LAUGHING SO HARD THAT HE CHOKED AND HAD TO LEAVE THE ROOM BEFORE I FINALLY UNDERSTOOD THAT PRÉSERVATIFSACTUALLY TRANSLATES TO MEAN CONDOMS, AND THAT I HAD JUST TOLD THIS GENTEEL ELDERLY COUPLE THAT FRENCH FOOD SUPERIOR TO AMERICAN FOOD BECAUSE IT DIDN’T HAVE CONDOMS IN IT

BEWARE THE FRENCHIFICATION OF ENGLISH WORDS. 

p.s. les agents de conservation = preservatives

Status of women in Islam

❝She Is Not A Lowly Object To Be Handled By The Hands And Gazed Upon By The Eyes (of the people). Rather, She Is A Preserved Pearl; Safeguarded For The Husband Who Allaah Has Made Permissible For Her And Made Her Permissible For Him. THIS IS THE WOMEN WITHIN AL-ISLAM.❞

-Shaykh Saalih Al-Fawzān حفظه الله
The status of Women in Islam (pg.21)

Selfless

I got a prompt from my dear storyaddicted1, and this is what came out. Super angst, sorry guys. Prompt at the end for spoilers.

Marian had a fairly lenient stance on what makes a person ‘good’. She never considered it to be about dos and don’ts; good people do this, good people don’t do that. She’d seen enough of the world to know things rarely fell into categories that neat.

Good people did bad things sometimes. Sometimes not even for the right reasons. She knew that.

Her father was a good man, who cared for the welfare of livestock and was kind to his wife and children and occasionally even gave whole loaves of bread to those who had nothing. And yet, with barely a second thought, he sold his daughter into an arranged marriage with a terrible man to preserve the family’s fortune.

Her husband, the one she chose, stole her from duty and misery into a life of thievery and love. He was a good man, albeit one who stole and killed and had no qualms about either if he could reconcile it with his conscience. 

It was the colour of a person’s soul that mattered most, in Marian’s opinion, and she had quite the knack for seeing whether someone was good or bad in their soul.

At least she thought she did.

Now she wasn’t so sure.

Because, after all, didn’t the perception of someone else’s goodness depend on your own moral compass? Someone who knew less of Robin, less of the people he stole from, might consider him a bad person. Someone who knew more of the Evil Queen might consider her to be different.

So many people had insisted she was different.

Marian hadn’t been interested.

It didn’t matter to her how deceived anybody else was about the witch who had captured and tormented her. She knew the evil that resided inside that woman, and nothing would convince her that she was anything other than dark at heart.

Not even Robin.

Not even Robin, who she trusted with her life, who she knew always did what he thought to be right, no matter what his personal feelings were.

And he had. Despite his personal feelings. Despite his heart.

He loved the Queen. She knew it as soon as he chased after that dark woman and insisted they all talk about this, though it took her significantly longer to admit it. She also knew that he would stay with her, Marian, even if it caused him pain, even if he loved another, because he wouldn’t abandon his code. Unless Marian released him from it.

She didn’t.

And as she knew he would, he looked into her eyes and promised he would be by her side always, just as he had when they were married under a blossoming elm tree, when she wore a blue muslin dress and he had a much different look in his eyes. She saw his pain as he reiterated that promise, saw what it was costing him to stay true to his honour. She could have told him she didn’t want him to be bound to her by the same duty he saved her from, she could have told him to go and find the Queen and tell her he loved her as he had once loved Marian.

But she didn’t. Because she didn’t want to be alone, she didn’t want to break her own heart by letting him go, she didn’t think the Queen deserved the happiness that she deserved, even if it wasn’t the happiness she had known before.

She hadn’t known until then what a capacity for selfishness she possessed.

And now Robin was on the ground, a hideous wound in his back, and the Queen’s scream as she sent every soldier in the place flying echoed the one in Marian’s own heart.

But she stood still, unable to move, while Regina dropped to her knees beside Robin, raging at him through her tears, telling him she wasn’t going to allow him to leave his family as well as her, he wasn’t going to leave her like this.

And Robin took hold of the shaking hand she held over his chest, raised his other hand to touch her face, spoke through the blood,

“I’m so sorry,” he said.

“No, don’t say it, you’re not going anywhere,” Regina snarled, sobbed. “You have a son, Robin, don’t you dare abandon him. Don’t you dare abandon your family.”

Marian felt the Queen’s selflessness like the sword that had killed her husband.

“You – “ Robin struggled out, his fingers tugging on the hair at Regina’s neck. “I should’ve – I love you.”

“No,” Regina said. “Don’t.”

Tears flowed unbidden down her cheeks, her loving, aching heart bared open for all to see. Robin stroked them away, his smile bloody and full of love, the goodness in her no news to him.

“Please,” she gasped, her grief already stealing her breath away.

“I love you, Regina,” Robin said again.

Leaning into him, Regina’s mouth formed words that Marian couldn’t hear. She didn’t have to.

 And then his hand fell before Regina could catch it, and she was curling in on herself, over him, her body shaking but no sound coming out, and Marian knew she was wrong.

She couldn’t see the colour of people’s souls as well as she’d thought.

She couldn’t see the darkness in her own until it was too late.

 

Prompt: Marian had committed the ultimate act of selfishness against the most selfless man in her life. Now he was gone. Gone for good, and she had missed her chance to give him back his life, his life with Regina.

Materfamilias

I’ve missed my family terribly these past few days, badly enough that I’ve begun to doubt my skills as a markswoman. Not that I’ve failed entirely. On the first day of the hunt, I did put a bullet in my husband’s heart. But Wilhelm was a large, lumbering man, while Ernst and Greta are small and agile. They’ve proven to be quite the challenge, not that I’m complaining. There’d be no point to this were it easy, and I’m awfully proud of my little ones for leading me on such a chase. Of course, it’s only a matter of time before I overtake them. The children don’t know the darkest depths of this forest like I do. And I’ve harried them so relentlessly that hunger and fatigue will be hobbling them by now. No huntress has ever been as merciless in pursuit of her prey as I.

I owe my children that.

My efforts will be rewarded soon. Most likely, I’ll return home, my true home at the heart of these woods, and place Wilhelm, Ernst, and Greta within the family room, perfectly preserved beside my other husbands, sons, and daughters. Having married so often and born so many children, one might think I would grow weary of that, yet I never do.

After all this time, occasionally I still think back to the first of my husbands claimed during this game, replaying the scene of my poor, sweet Josef pleading with me to spare our boys. “They have their whole lives ahead of them!” he begged. “A few meager decades!” I cried back. “After a thousand years walking this world, I can tell you that a brief span of mortal decay can hardly be called a life!” Then I let fly my arrow to pierce Josef’s poor, sweet heart, for I loved him so. I love them all, most especially my children. I will not allow another to wither away to nothing. Better to die young and gloriously in the hunt. And there’s always the hope that–

What’s that I hear?

Rustling in the underbrush.

Stifled groans of pain and exertion.

I hurry forward and find my son and daughter crossing a small, sunlit clearing, Greta dragging a lame, bloodied leg and Ernst desperately pulling her along. A twig snaps beneath my boot, and they turn and spot me. In an instant, Ernst drops his sister and flees, leaving her behind screaming for help. My poor, sweet Greta tries to crawl away, but I stop her with a heel upon her back, pinning her down as I aim my rifle. Her sobs bring to mind so many other daughters I’ve slain. “Hush now, darling,” I whisper to her. “Mama’s here.” With a squeeze of the trigger, I send my love straight through Greta’s poor, sweet heart…

Now for ruthless little Ernst. I wonder… Will he be the child to finally best me and take this eternal life for his own? Oh, what a happy mother that would make me!

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