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My Top 5 Root Moments

Shoot Week Day 1 - Favourite Root Moments

(All gifs are mine. They took forever and they’re Not Good, and I’ve developed such a massive appreciation for everyone who spends the time making these things.) 

1. Root’s view of the universe (317)

This scene perfectly encapsulates Root’s misanthropy. The idea that she presents here is Camus’ Absurdism, which describes the conflict between the universe’s inherent meaninglessness and our need to find a purpose. Camus argued that the only true way to resolve this conflict is by embracing the Absurd – acknowledging the chaos of the universe while defiantly searching for meaning anyway. This episode, which is the springboard to Root’s redemption arc, concludes with Root doing just that. The Machine gives Root’s life meaning, but She encourages Root to make her own choices. Root also admits that she cares about Shaw, Finch and even “the helper monkey.”

2. Shapes and symphonies (510)

Can you believe that Root discussed philosophy and metaphysics and made a joke about Shaw’s glorious ass all during a lethal shootout? Legends only.

This entire speech was great, but I particularly like the lines in the gif above. It’s such a contrast to Root’s previous thoughts about the universe being “infinite and chaotic and cold.” Instead, she indicates that we forge our paths in the universe – which, as I discussed earlier, sounds very similar to the idea of “embracing the Absurd.” 

I also appreciate how meta this line is. Root and Shaw, aren’t real, but they still mean everything to me, both individually and as a couple. And even though they are no longer on our TV screens now that POI has ended, we can still keep them alive in our imaginations through our fics, art, gifs and so on.  

3. Root’s newfound sense of belonging (510)

Root spent the majority of her life alone, shunning humanity. This moment in which she admits to Shaw that she’s finally found a family and a sense of belonging was hard-fought, which makes it all the more gratifying. She had to earn Team Machine’s trust. She risked her life for them repeatedly and even endured brutal torture. But as she said, she wouldn’t change any of it. 

4. Root and the truth (301)

I loved Root from the moment that she pulled a gun on Finch in 123, but this is the scene where she became my favourite character of all time. This monologue is incredibly chilling and really conveys Root’s power. Her voice shakes from the thorazine that she’s being forced to take and from rage (at her confinement and at this psychiatrist, who easily fits her definition of bad code). It’s a tremendous performance by Amy Acker. 

5. “Maybe someday” (411)

In Prophets (405), Root says that a good end would be a privilege for her. Here, she gets what she would probably feel is a “good end”.  As Root knows that she is about to die saving the world, all she wants is confirmation that there could be something between her and Shaw someday. The way her face lights up at the mere possibility of them having a future together absolutely breaks my heart.

collab with @vivilartista!!

here are the precious kids!! I had so much fun drawing Cyan, especially her hair!! And happy birthday Cyan!! <3

I sometimes wonder if Bioware fully considers the implications of decisions characters make in their games…? Like Alistair seemed like such an asshole in Redcliffe, but he had good reason to be furious with Fiona.

Thoughts under the cut.

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All Moments Are Equally Precious

‘The Buddha’s Eightfold Path can either build upon or dismantle the sense-of-self, depending upon how we use it. When aligned within its proper orientation, the path appears like a perfectly formed diamond, each facet complimenting the beauty of the whole. After my meeting with Nisargadatta, the Buddha’s teaching became breathtaking in its simplicity and elegance. The entire path was, and had always been, accessible. prolonged retreats in silence or conversations over dinner had the same reference point. Nothing was ever at odds with its opposite. Every practice and action has its place and appropriate time, but never contradicted or enhanced what was already there. Everything was perfectly together, and every moment arose from that perfection.

This was the beginning of my understanding of lay Buddhism. A lay Buddhist is one who fully embodies his or her entire life of work, family, and relationships without spiritually prioritizing any activity. From this perspective all moments are equally precious, and whether we are practicing formal meditation on retreat or showing up for ordinary moments of our lay life, freedom is never diminished. The unequivocal resolve not to move away from where we are is essential. Once we abandon the belief that there is a more spiritually useful moment than the one we are in, we have embraced our life and infused it with the energy for awakening.’

- Rodney Smith, Undivided Mind, from the Winter 2010 issue of Tricycle: The Buddhist Review.

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