preme

A Good Story About Bad Grades

My first year of college was an exercise in humility. I arrived with my type A personality and perfectionism in tow, a living high school overachiever stereotype, eager to sign up for the most difficult classes available. And, despite the warnings of my adviser, I did just that.

By the time third week–and with it, exams–rolled around, I was falling apart. I was constantly behind, staying up till 3 a.m. to finish an assignment then sleeping for 12 hours the next day. I didn’t eat well. I cried every two or three days. I was miserable: physically, emotionally, and academically.

This collapse persisted for the duration of the year. While my schedule and habits improved somewhat, the year concluded with rather abysmal grades–the kind that result in your adviser telling you you’re not going straight from undergrad to med school. When I saw the B- in Gen Chem, my second of the year, I went for an hour-long drive. I thought about transferring. I thought about dropping the bio major. I thought about letting go of medicine. 

Over the summer, I decided to do whatever it took to continue with medicine. I changed my habits (pro tip: make sleep a priority) in studying, socializing, and taking care of myself. I promised to work harder.

However, I was sure that OChem would destroy me. With my background in chemistry, I believed OChem was something to be survived, not something in which to succeed. So when I got a 43 on my first midterm, over two standard deviations below average, it just confirmed my conclusions: I wasn’t that smart, but I would suffer through. 

I was committed to that suffering: I took my exam to my TA’s office hours, desperate to scrape a passing grade. Sheepishly, I flipped through the pages, expecting the furrowed-brow frown that read “how could you not understand this?” to appear on my TA’s face at any moment. But it didn’t. 

“This was a difficult exam,” he said.

“It was more difficult for me than most.” I mumbled. “I didn’t do so well in Gen Chem either.”

“That’s okay. How you did in Gen Chem doesn’t mean you’ll do the same in OChem.”

I was shocked to not be treated as the stupid student. I had regained my motivation over the summer, and now I was regaining my confidence. I threw myself into studying for my next midterm.

63. Just below average. Every insecurity returned: how could I study this hard and still barely brush average? If this is how hard I have to work for this grade, maybe I’m just not good enough. Maybe I just can’t cut it.

Still, I wasn’t ready to give up. When the final came around, I studied for a full week beforehand. 

I got an 85 on that final, two standard deviations above average. I didn’t think it was possible for me to do that well in OChem. I couldn’t believe it–but I began to.

After that, my grades rose across the board. Soon, I didn’t need a week to study, because I had worked so hard and continuously that I developed an instinct for the subject. I began to love OChem–I even tutor in it now.

My last midterm of the year I received a 95, moving from a bottom scorer to top five in my class. My second year GPA was 0.63 higher than my first year GPA. I had done what seemed impossible.

For any struggling student who’s reading this, I hope I can do for you what my TA did for me: believe in yourself. You can overcome bad grades. You are smart enough, and you are hardworking enough. Intelligence is elastic: you can make yourself smarter. There is no point at which you are doomed to fail. So keep trying: you may discover you’re capable of more than you ever dreamed.

im not sure kung magmemed na ba talaga ako pero one thing is for sure sobrang natutuwa ako sa skills ng ate ko as a nurse yung tipong kapag sinabi naming may masakit sa gantong part ng katawan namin or kung ano man alam niya yung gamot or remedy para don so kapag may sakit kami mabilis kaming gumaling chos and gusto ko ring maging ganon tas super interested din me sa mga gamot haha kaya either pharma or nursing talaga ang gusto kong premed but my ate says na nursing is better lalo na kung di ko matutuloy ang pagmemed

50 Reasons Why You Should Study

Need motivation?

  1. To get an education. 
  2. To earn a degree. There are barely any jobs that offer positions to people without a degree, or are on the path of obtaining one.
  3. To prove people wrong. That science teacher that said you’ll never make it in the medical field? Make him eat his words. 
  4. To prove yourself wrong. Every student has doubts on whether or not they can be good enough in the classroom. Prove yourself wrong, and always be better than you were yesterday. 
  5. This is a privilege. Regardless of how much you believe that you HAVE to do this, to some extend you don’t. Realize that you have the privilege of an education even being an option for you.
  6. Take advantage of what you’re capable of. Don’t waste a perfectly intelligent mind. 
  7. More money. That degree can do wonderful things to your bank account in the future. 
  8. It’s interesting. Studying can get pretty boring, but there are always those topics that spark your curiosity and motivate you to learn more.
  9. It’s attractive. Not everyone cares for someone who is academically gifted, but a partner who is eager to learn makes me eager to take my pants off.
  10. It’s useful. That random fact that you read in a random textbook can stick with you and really end up helping you out one day.
  11. It’s fun to know useless shit sometimes.
  12. To make your parents proud. This is one of the main reasons I study. My parents have always been aware of my capabilities and have pushed me to be academically better every year. They know I have big dreams, and I just want to achieve them so they can know that their child made it.
  13. To make myself proud. This goes along with number four. Knowing that you accomplished something, however small or big the thing may be, is a huge self-esteem booster.
  14. To be independent. There’s nothing quite like knowing that you don’t need someone else’s job, degree, intelligence, or presence to make you successful.
  15. To pursue your passion. 
  16. To gain knowledge. Whether its in your field, or a completely different one, being knowledgeable is just downright fun.
  17. People will look up to you. Your siblings, your best friends, and your classmates may see you consistently studying, and it could motivate them to do the same. 
  18. To make a name for yourself. “Oh yeah, (insert name here), I know them. Aren’t they like really successful now?”
  19. To become your own role model.
  20. To be able to pay off your student loans.
  21. Because the long nights and excessive coffee will all be worth it. Even if it doesn’t seem like it now. 
  22. To exercise your brain. Your brain is just like a muscle, and like the body it needs to be exercised. 
  23. To improve your hippocampus. Your hippocamus is responsible for memory, and if you study your memorization will become significantly better.
  24. To not waste time doing useless stuff. 
  25. Because stationary is amazing. I could spend a whole paycheck on just pens.
  26. Because notes are actually all so pretty. 
  27. To be productive. I used to spend a lot of time on social media, and although I still do, the amount of time I spend studying and getting stuff done has definitely increased.
  28. So classes will be easier. 
  29. So tests will be easier.
  30. To impress your professors. Get those letters of recommendation! 
  31. So the anxiety of getting a bad grade is sufficiently decreased. I constantly worry about my grades, but studying has helped me not worry so much.
  32. Because coffee exists. 
  33. There is no other atmosphere quite like the inside of a library. 
  34. So you won’t have to retake a class. Failing a prerequisite for your major really sucks, so maybe try not failing the first time around. This also saves you a lot of money because you won’t have to pay for the class again. 
  35. Finals week won’t suck as bad. You’ll be used to studying so when finals week comes around it wont nearly be as stressful as for those students who are now opening a textbook. 
  36. You won’t go to as many college parties. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for socializing and having fun, but a lot can go wrong at a college party very quickly. And there’s no better way to prevent that, than just not going to the party cause you’re reading your economics textbook. 
  37. You’ll get used to FOMO. Fear of Missing Out. Every teenagers nightmare. Eventually, you’ll get used to the feeling. 
  38. You’ll be getting the most out of your college experience. You’re paying for these classes. Might as well try your best to pass. 
  39. You’ll get used to not getting enough sleep. So, if you decide to go to grad school you’ll have that department covered. 
  40. There’s really good study music out there. 
  41. I guarantee there will be at least 5 places on campus, or around you that are perfect for studying, and you’ll want to go there everyday. 
  42. You’ll become a pro at writing essays, or lab reports.
  43. You’ll learn fairly quickly that study groups rarely work. 
  44. You’ll make a lot of friends that are just as passionate about studying as you are. And you will cherish them. 
  45. Beauty and Brains. Don’t you want to fit that description? 
  46. Thousands of students before you have done it, so you can too. 
  47. You can run a studyblr. Aren’t they the cutest? 
  48. You get really good at time management. 
  49. Sleep becomes 5x more satisfactory after a night of studying.
  50. Because you want to. There’s no better motivation for studying, than the motivation that comes from within.