prefab

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THE WEDGE | CSPU

In an effort to modernize the experience of staying overnight at California State Park cabins, the Parks Forward Commission invited architecture students from California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to design new cabins to be placed at campgrounds throughout the state.

via dwell / photos by Paul Wu

New Post has been published on http://www.tinyhouseliving.com/freedom-yurt-cabins/

Freedom Yurt-Cabins

Solid walls, an integrated flooring system, real insulation, house windows, roundwood frame and rafters, and a wood ceiling with a tongue and groove look give the Yurt-Cabin a distinctive cabin feel. And it’s engineered for strength and longevity. And assembly is about as easy as it gets with the Yurt-Cabin’s built-in floor system and bolt-together design.” – Freedom Yurt-Cabins

Learn more about Freedom Yurt-Cabins

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Backyard Room | Bill McCorkell + David Martin

…to design and construct sustainable garden studios that recognise innovation, passive solar principles, energy savings and the environment.

In most cases our garden rooms require no permit and cause minimal disruption, are designed and built in six weeks, and are installed on site in under five days. 

Bill McCorkell via The Meander Journal 

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Jens Risom’s Block Island Family Retreat, Rhode Island, Built in 1967

“The popular magazines were all saying that one
couldn’t build a summer home for less than $25,000,” recalls Jens Risom, seated comfortably in a chair of his own design inside his home in New Canaan, Connecticut. “So I contacted Life magazine and said, ‘well, I have one.’”

Life magazine was impressed, not just with the project but with Risom himself—at that point, the designer had already won decades of accolades in modern furniture circles. The resulting article, a lushly photographed ode to Risom’s customized A-frame that he sourced from a catalog and had delivered in pieces to his remote island site off Rhode Island, helped to raise the aesthetic profile of modular construction. At the time, prefab suffered from a public-perception problem—the post–World War II housing boom and the subsequent need for quickly produced, kit-assembly structures had given the landscape of “ready-mades” a “dreary sameness” and a “cheapjack reputation.” Risom’s structure, with its use of weathered wood, soaring cathedral ceiling, and expansive openness tied to its bucolic location, set a new standard for what prefab could look like.