pre raphaelite style

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Thomas Cooper Gotch (1854–1931, England)

Paintings 1

Gotch was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter and illustrator. He studied art in London and Antwerp before he married and studied in Paris with his wife, Caroline, a fellow artist. Returning to Britain, they settled into the Newlyn art colony in Cornwall. He first made paintings of natural, pastoral settings before immersing himself in the romantic, Pre-Raphaelite romantic style for which he is best known. His daughter was often a model for the colourful depictions of young girls. His works have been exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal College of Art and the Paris Salon.

anonymous asked:

Hello Auntie Jillie! I was just wondering, I have very curly and frizzy hair, and I love it, but how can I make it more gothy? I mean, it is about down to my neck, and I've been doing it in Victorian style up-do's as of late, but I was just looking for some advice. I also have a blonde stripe in it, modeled after Sweeney Todd and Dave Vanian of course.

It sounds like you have the sort of hair texture I have wanted all my life. (I know, there are plenty of curly-haired people who would happily trade with me for my straight hair.)

In your place, I would keep doing the Victorian style updos while growing it out. Look for some interesting hair accessories to decorate the updos, if you have the budget to do so!

As your hair grows out, then start encouraging your hair’s curly texture, and go for wild, flowing pre-Raphaelite styles. 

Does anyone else have any other suggestions?

flickr

John William Waterhouse by Nicole Ameda

<br /><i>Via Flickr:</i>
<br />The Magic Circle, 1886

John William Waterhouse RA (April 6, 1849 – February 10, 1917) was an English painter known for working in the Pre-Raphaelite style.

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John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Nocturnes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

Magic, Racial Tensions and Archaeology in Rivers of London

So I want to talk about some themes I keep seeing popping up. I have no conclusions I just want to talk about them (some THT spoilers). This also went very school english essay, sorry. 

Urban fantasy is a fairly new subset of the fantasy genre, and it is significantly different from modern fantasy cities set in an ahistorical past like Minas Tirith, Ankh Morpork, King’s Landing etc. in that it is set in a recognisable modern city. Urban fantasy cities have more in common with Charles Dickens London and his ghosts of various tenses in that it often exists to point out political and cultural failings. By using magic, urban fantasy strips its narrative of the quotidian that serves as an easy distraction from the issue the story wants to highlight to make it easier to process. 

This has a long history in English literature, with Shakespeare setting many of his plays that comment on Elizabethan society in Italy, while modern examples include A Song of Ice and Fire’s message of the pointlessness of petty political squabbling when faced with serious issues. Urban fantasy uses magic in the same way, except by setting it in a modern city it creates a sort of circus mirror through magic - everything looks almost the same, but modern anxieties are reflected and writ large. Rivers of London uses magic in particular to create a magical analogy for racial tensions.

Keep reading

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John Atkinson Grimshaw (1836–1893, England)

Marine scenes

Grimshaw was an English Victorian-era artist, popular both during his time and in the present for his night-time depictions of British cities.

Grimshaw’s earliest influence was the Pre-Raphaelites. True to the Pre-Raphaelite style, he created landscapes of accurate colour and lighting, vivid detail and realism, often typifying seasons or a type of weather. Moonlit views of city and suburban streets and of the docks in London, Leeds, Liverpool and Glasgow also figured largely in his art. The focus on atmosphere, and lack of moral message or historical reference allies his work to some extent with the Aesthetic Movement.

His careful painting and his skill in lighting effects meant that he captured both the appearance and the mood of a scene in minute detail. His “paintings of dampened gas-lit streets and misty waterfronts conveyed an eerie warmth as well as alienation in the urban scene.” Later in life his colour palette shifted from dark blues to golden yellows, and towards the end of his life were hints of a change in artistic direction, with looser brushwork influenced by his friend James Abbott McNeill Whistler, who was quoted saying “I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.”

The Latest News (1920). Edmund Blair Leighton (British, 1853-1922). Oil on canvas.

The house depicted is Kirby Cottage, the summer home of the artist. Leighton specialized in medieval and Regency subjects in his decorative, fastidiously produced paintings. Although not a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, his work is often associated with the Pre-Raphaelite and Romantic styles of painting.

10

John William Waterhouse (1849–1917, England)

Scenes from mythology

Waterhouse was an English painter known for working in the Pre-Raphaelite style, as well as being one of the last exponents of this aesthetic. His artworks are known for their depictions of women from both ancient Greek mythology and Arthurian legend.

anonymous asked:

Um excuse me, why are you doing art in a post modern german impressionistic style, I thought you liked pre-raphaelite pop culture style, please go back to the pre-raphaelite style as I do not like the other thing I just made up and have already forgotten.

I’m sorry I can’t go back to the post moder german impresionist style, I’m an evolving artist. My future is this:

 

10

Thomas Cooper Gotch (1854–1931, England)

Paintings 2

Gotch was an English Pre-Raphaelite painter and illustrator. He studied art in London and Antwerp before he married and studied in Paris with his wife, Caroline, a fellow artist. Returning to Britain, they settled into the Newlyn art colony in Cornwall. He first made paintings of natural, pastoral settings before immersing himself in the romantic, Pre-Raphaelite romantic style for which he is best known. His daughter was often a model for the colourful depictions of young girls. His works have been exhibited at the Royal Academy, Royal College of Art and the Paris Salon.

Josephine Montilyet from Dragon Age: Inquisition

Originally wanted to try a pre-raphaelite style with this piece - I’ve emulated the pose and the colours, but i found the actual look hard to do, so I left the style as rather sketchy. I can do a smoother style now, but it is nice to look back and see that it was this piece specifically that founded my more recent digital art skills.

Artist Maud Taber-Thomas at the MET copying Sargent’s The Wyndham Sisters. Photo by Xueli Zheng.

Taber-Thomas draws much of her inspiration from the Romantic symbolism of Victorian painters such as the Pre-Raphaelites, while her painting style evokes a more impressionistic sensibility like the society portraits of John Singer Sargent. Taber-Thomas’s greatest love is painting evocative portraits.