praise poet

Beautiful Aphrodite, fairest of the deathless
gods, golden one whose name was praised by poets,
whose comely form was carved in stone, you are the ideal
of loveliness and grace, O peerless, flawless goddess.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Laughter-loving Aphrodite, bringer of joy
and merriment, who takes delight in all things
pleasant and lighthearted, all festivals and feasts,
all cheerful diversions and celebrations.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Aphrodite known as Peitho, mistress of sweet
persuasion, who turns the hearts of men and women
toward love, your gifts are welcomed by us all, goddess;
we are compelled by the eloquence of desire.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Aphrodite, shaper of passions who kindles
the fire of life, you awaken the oldest
of instincts; by your will our breath quickens, our pulse
pounds, hard and harder until we hear nothing else.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Clever Aphrodite, contriver of the sweetest
schemes, with cunning and guile you clear the way for love.
Devious one, deceptive one, to you do lovers turn
to find the forbidden, to grant the heart its desire.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Aphrodite of the bridal bed, of two hearts
bound with ties as strong and thin as spider-silk.
You watch with care, O goddess, as we pledge ourselves
to one another, hands clasped in an oath of love.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Aphrodite of all people, goddess of
the low and the lewd, the common and the coarse,
Aphrodite universal, Aphrodite blue,
Aphrodite of the need and the now. Goddess,
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

Aphrodite Ourania, heavenly one,
born of brutality, from seafoam and blood
you arose. Aphrodite of the spirit,
of a love pure and true, of a flame bright and still.
I praise and honor you, I thank you for your blessings.

— 

Aphrodite

Found on GreekPagan.com

Wu Zao (or Wu Tsao) is considered one of the great female poets of China, and one of the greatest lesbian poets of all time. Very little of her work has been translated into English, but the most beautiful translations are the handful by Kenneth Rexroth and Ling Chung (the above being the best of the bunch, IMO).

Born in 1799, Wu Zao was the child of a merchant, and married to a merchant (in an arranged marriage, naturally). Both relationships are believed to have been unhappy. There were no literati in either family, and no one knows how she learned to read, write, play music and paint, since women of the merchant class were rarely taught these skills. A common dictum in the era was “A woman without talent is a virtuous one.” She basically said, “Fuck that noise,” and became a productive and talented poet, playwright and composer; one of the few female writers of the period. She used her writing to express her longing to break away from a traditional view of women’s roles, including an opera about a woman who cross-dresses and paints her own self-portrait, while lamenting her inability to use her talents because she is a woman and the gender roles of the era are stupid.

Her work was highly praised by poets and scholars, and her songs were sung all over China. She hobnobbed with other great artists of the age, both male and female. In her middle years she retreated from the world and became a Taoist priestess. (Or a Buddhist one, depending on who you ask). She died in 1863.

It’s clear from her poetry that she had sexual and romantic relationships with women, but apart from the short biography by Rexroth and Chung in their book Women Poets of China, it’s impossible to find a biography in English that does more than hint at her lesbianism. According to them, she had many female friends and lovers during her life, and wrote erotic poems to several courtesans, including this one. After reading it, I like to imagine her and Ch'ing Lin hanging out in her bedroom, painting each each other’s eyebrows and making out, like some kind of 19th century Chinese version of a sexy high school sleepover.

[Translation from Women Poets of China by Kenneth Rexroth and Ling Chung; biographical information primarily from Women Poets of China, The Anchor Book of Chinese Poetry and The Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women].

2

Mount Fuji has long been praised by poets and depicted by artists for its beautiful shape and sacred status. Japanese artist Utagawa Hiroshige (1797–1858) created numerous views of Mount Fuji over the course of his career, depicting the mountain in different seasons and from a variety of viewpoints.

Come and see a brand new FREE display of Hiroshige’s views of Mount Fuji, now open in Gallery 29.

The artworks, from the Ashmolean’s own collection, include views of Mount Fuji from several different Hiroshige series; some devoted entirely to Fuji and others in which Fuji appears in views of Edo, or is seen from the Tōkaidō Road, Japan’s major highway.

“What they had done in their youth, and what for millenniums had been man’s vocation, joy, and pleasure - to ride a horse, to plow in the morning the steaming field, to walk behind the oxen, to mow the yellow grain in the blazing summer heat while streams of sweat poured down the tanned body and women who bound the sheaves could hardly keep in step with the mowers, to rest at noon for a meal in the shade of green trees - all this, praised by the poets since times immemorial, was now past and gone. Joy in labor had disappeared.”

Ernst Jünger The Glass Bees.

You said “I’m sorry.” so much that it’s starting to taste like blood at the back of my throat. And you asked why I never said anything when you apologized, I think you failed to realize I was choking on all the sorry’s , my teeth stained red, my lungs struggling for air. Now I can breathe, and my teeth are white, and I no longer feel suffocated. Thank you for teaching me sorry doesn’t mean anything unless the person actually proves they mean it.
2

Notre Dame Cathedral – one of the most famous temples in the world, an outstanding architectural monument, praised by poets, writers, artists. The first stone was laid in 1163 in the presence of Pope Alexander III. Construction lasted from 1163 to 1345. This creation became the phenomenon for new Europe, and people from all over the world still admire this masterpiece that was created many centuries ago but we still strive to Paris to see how it looks in reality

Galavant Appreciation Week: Day 4: Favorite Relationship/Dynamic

Again, I’m a day late with this one and I seem to be stuck playing catch up, but better late than never right?  There are a lot of gifs and none of them are mine, I’m just using them to illustrate my point and because Gal and Izzy are super lovely to look at.

Galavant and Isabella: 

I’m sure it’ll come as a surprise to absolutely no one that my favourite dynamic/relationship on the show is the relationship between Galavant and Isabella. Isabella is “small and cute and ethnically hard to pin down” and Galavant has  "a face most chicks have a thing about"…basically these are two uber attractive people. 

Not only are these two undeniably gorgeous (I mean, duh and as Jean Hamm would say “Well, well, well. Hello there.”), but they also subscribe to one of my fave relationship tropes which is the love/hate relationship.


When Isabella and Galavant first meet each other, they can barely stand each other. Isabella finds Gal in a perpetual state of drunkenness in his hovel and she’d probably agree with her parents at this point in time if they called him a “waste of space”. She tells him of her woes and he says, “That’s terrible, just terrible. But you have a nice way about you I’m sure you’ll land on your feet. Nice meeting you, doors on the wall.” Isabella then begs him to save her people but Gal completely tunes her out and says:

 Isabella is utterly exasperated with him and Galavant finds her annoying and bossy and is this the beginning a beautiful relationship? I think so! 

Galavant eventually agrees to help Isabella reclaim her kingdom once he learns that King Richard is the one who invaded it. It is at this point that the audience discovers that Isabella is leading Galavant into a trap, but we still can’t help but love this precious cupcake because she is clearly wrestling with guilt about it…and this is before she even gets to know our hero. The angst is built into this relationship from the get go and it is absolutely delicious. 

Over the course of season one, Galavant and Isabella grow from being strangers to reluctant teammates to friends to a couple that is meant for each other. Isabella trains Galavant and teaches him how to be a knight again.

 She becomes our hero’s hero and “brings him back to himself”.

 Galavant becomes more considerate and caring around her. She’s always on his mind 

and he defends her when she isn’t there to defend herself (“Call her a mouth breather one more time!”). Because of his feelings for Isabella, Galavant learns that it’s not always about him, he’s not just “the hero that gets the raisins”…sometimes other people get the raisins too…like when Galavant stashes some trail mix aside and gives them to Isabella “raisins intact”. 

The relationship development between these two is so well done that you can go back and rewatch it and track it episode by episode. Galavant goes from “seeing [Isabella’s] mouth start moving and…needing a drink” in Joust Friends (1x02) to telling her that he doesn’t always listen when she speaks but he’s going to work on that in Comedy Gold (1x04) 

to telling Isabella that speaking to her is one of his favorite things to do in My Cousin Izzy (1x07). 

Likewise, Isabella learns to see Galavant in a completely different light. In the pilot she thinks of him as a bumbling buffoon and she tells him, “You’re no hero”, and in Joust Friends, she constantly questions him and his abilities

 until she gradually starts to trust him and becomes his biggest fan in It’s All in the Executions (1x08) when she tells him, 

Similarly, Galavant’s heroism is directly connected to his relationship with Isabella and as their relationship blooms so does Galavant’s heroism. He becomes the hero we always knew he was.


Galavant realizes that they only kind of hero he wants to be is her hero 

and he goes from saying “Nice meeting you, doors on the wall” and giving zero shits about her and people in general (mostly because Maddie seriously did a number on him) to putting her safety and the lives of his friends above everything else. Galavant promises Isabella that he’s going to save all of them in Dungeons and Dragon Lady (1x06),

then in My Cousin Izzy, Galavant says “I’m going to save all of them, especially her” and he races across the banquet hall to save Izzy from eating shellfish. 

Lastly, in “It’s all in the Executions”, Galavant flat out refuses to leave Isabella behind until Gareth promises to to take care of her.


We’ve come quite a long way since, “You have a nice way about you, I’m sure you’ll land on your feet”. 


Of course I’d be remiss if I failed to mention their heavenly duets and how well their voices blend together and how their love songs are so honest and refresh and true to them. 

And then there’s how attractive they are and how attractive they find each other and Isabella going “damn” when she sees Gal pour water on himself because she’s found “the abs the poets praise" 

and Gal saying: 

Oh and there’s also the way Gal calls Isabella’s mom, "Mummy!” and says:

 which is simultaneously hilarious and squeeworthy because this means that he envisions a future with Isabella even in his extremely drunken state.  I mean, don’t they just look perfect together here:

Also, I can’t forget the eyesex and how they had eyesex babies in that monastery and how Isabella was hoping beyond hope that Galavant would live and he could forgive her for betraying his trust and how she had to be the one to remind him about Madalena and how he was like, “Oh yeah right her. Sorry I forget about her because of the stunning, amazing woman in front of me” and basically it all adds up to complete perfection.

“[Galabella’s] the complete package and I, for one, am finally throwing my arms in the air and giving into it.”

Oh who am I kidding? I’m Galabella trash. They had me at “I’m sorry, what is that smell?” and I’ve grown to love them more with every episode and I AM BEYOND ECSTATIC THAT MY BABIES ARE COMING BACK AND WE’RE GOING TO GET MORE FOREVER KISSES 

AND MORE OF GAL TELLING IZZY THAT SHE’S WONDERFUL AND MORE OF IZZY TELLING GAL THAT SHE BELIEVES IN HIM. 

Can I have season 2 now please?

Happy Chinese New Year!

Happy Chinese New Year! 新年快乐 (that’s ‘sshin-nyen kwhy-luh’). It’s the Year of the Rooster (雞), number 10 out of the 12 signs of the Chinese zodiac. 

This delicately decorated rooster-themed vase was made in Jingdezhen, the ‘Porcelain Capital’ of China, between 1730-1780.

About 500km East from the ‘Porcelain Capital’ were the Yue Kiln Sites in Zhejiang Province where this charming Greenware jar and ewer were made.

Green-glazed ceramics were first made in east China more than 3,000 years ago, and later wares were made for daily use and for burial in tombs. Many burial wares were ceramic models that showed aspects of daily life, such as cooking stoves or domestic animals.

From about AD 300 onwards, the Yue kilns began producing inkstones and waterdroppers for calligraphers. In the Tang dynasty (AD 618-906) the wares were used for tea-drinking. They were much admired and praised by poets.

'In the breezes and mists of autumn the Yue kilns are opened to reveal the brilliant greens of a thousand mountains.’ 

- Lu Guimeng, died AD 881

What they had done in their youth, and what for millenniums had been man’s vocation, joy, and pleasure - to ride a horse, to plough in the morning the streaming field, to walk behind the oxen, to mow the yellow grain in the blazing summer heat while streams of sweat poured down the tanned body and the women who bound the sheaves could hardly keep in step with the mowers, to rest at noon for a meal in the shade of green trees - all this, praised by the poets since times immemorial, was now passed and gone. Joy in labour had disappeared.
—  Ernst Junger - The Glass Bees

“What they had done in their youth, and what for millenniums had been man’s vocation, joy, and pleasure - to ride a horse, to plough in the morning the streaming field, to walk behind the oxen, to mow the yellow grain in the blazing summer heat while streams of sweat poured down the tanned body and the women who bound the sheaves could hardly keep in step with the mowers, to rest at noon for a meal in the shade of green trees—all this, praised by the poets since times immemorial, was now passed and gone. Joy in labour had disappeared.”

— Ernst Jünger, The Glass Bees.

I had never noticed that all enjoyment spontaneously overflows into praise…. The world rings with praise—lovers praising their mistresses, readers their favourite poet, walkers praising the countryside, players praising their favourite game…. I had not noticed either that just as men spontaneously praise whatever they value, so they spontaneously urge us to join them in praising it: ‘Isn’t she lovely? Wasn’t it glorious? Don’t you think that magnificent?’ The Psalmists in telling everyone to praise God are doing what all men do when they speak of what they care about. My whole, more general, difficulty about the praise of God depended on my absurdly denying to us, as regards the supremely Valuable, what we delight to do, what indeed we can’t help doing, about everything else we value. I think we delight to praise what we enjoy because the praise not merely expresses but completes the enjoyment; it is its appointed consummation. It is not out of compliment that lovers keep on telling one another how beautiful they are; the delight is incomplete till it is expressed.
—  C.S. Lewis
I admired him because he was not afraid to be both the Christian boy leading worship on a Sunday morning and the sexy boy singing love songs on a coffee shop’s acoustic night. He was not a stereotype and I found that to be extremely attractive.