praeter

Big spoilers about CoHF deaths
Hi Cassie!!! First of all, I’m a huge fan of your books. They are some of my favorite series ever. I am unrealistically excited for TDA. My question is: what made you make the decision to kill Jordan in CoHF? He was, while not a MAJOR character, a huge component in the series and a major minor character (does that make sense?). Not only that, but how did you decide on his way of death? He was one of the only characters in the entire series that had a death that we were not immediate bystanders to. Maia just arrived at the Praeter Lupis and he was… Dead. You also left quite a few unanswered questions with Maia. Who does she end up with? (I can’t be the only fan asking this!) I hope you find the time to answer my questions. Your Fan, Roni Wagner — ronithereader Jordan was killed because war is horrible and has consequences, and fairness has nothing to do with it — in fact nothing has less to do with fairness than war. Sebastian was evil, and that certainly made for a horrific war. But even when there aren’t demonic enemies, war always has a human cost, often to innocent people. While his level of innocence is open to debate, Jordan was one of those people.

“Not only that, but how did you decide on his way of death? He was one of the only characters in the entire series that had a death that we were not immediate bystanders to.”

I’m puzzled by this question because Jordan did die in scene. When Maia and Jordan arrived at the Praetor Lupus, everyone there besides Sebastian was already dead, including Praetor Scott. Jordan is very alive, until Sebastian follows them. Maia witnesses Jordan’s death in Chapter 5, and the reader does too.

“You also left quite a few unanswered questions with Maia. Who does she end up with?”

You’ll have to wait and see. ; )

Andrea Alciati, Omnia D. And. Alciati emblemata : ad quae singula, praeter concinnas acutásque inscriptiones, lepidas & expressas imagines, ac caetera omnia, quae prioribus nostris editionibus cúm ad eorum distinctionem, tum ad ornatum & correctionem adhibita continebantur, : nunc primùm perelegantia persubtiliáq[ue] adiecta sunt epimuthia, quibus emblematum amplitudo quaecunq[ue] in iis dubia sunt aut obscura, tanquam perspicuis illustrantur (1566)

A Prayer for a Friend’s Safe Journey

Horace, Odes 1.3, ll. 1-8

Thus may the goddess who rules over Cyprus
Guide you; thus may Helen’s brothers,
The shining stars, guide you; and thus may
The father of winds guide you, binding
All the breezes save for the Iapyx-
You, o ship, who have had Vergil entrusted
To you, and owe him to me; and I pray
That you deliver him safe to Attica’s shores
And preserve the man who is half of my soul.

   Sic te diva potens Cypri,
sic fratres Helenae, lucida sidera,
  ventorumque regat pater
obstrictis aliis praeter Iapyga,
  navis, quae tibi creditum
debes Vergilium; finibus Atticis
  reddas incolumem precor
et serves animae dimidium meae.

The Ship ‘Portpatrick’, Thomas G. Purvis, late 19th or early 20th century

2

“I love you, darling.”

“I love you too, Mama.”

Her hand clenched her body’s shirt and wrenched it off of it; a gust of strangely ad rem, strong wind assisting her with its pants and underwear, blowing all around the small cot. 

“Sweet Winney the Second–um, I get the princess motif is a big thing, but–”

Slow sizing of its waistline, her hands moving up and down the naked chocolate back before she began choosing a nightgown: a nice white dress, with what I could assume to be red symbols patterning all over it. 

“–is this really…uh…”

Her smile sold it. “Necesse? Absit! Ut enim putabant quia tota vis animi voluptatis regno meo vasculo volui dabo tibi munera retribuit. Aliquid plus quam solebat, praeter - non pernoctabit apud eos, quod pestilentem vendo.”

“…Bene gratias, Maria? Album …humilitas humilium, non in lumine, si esset aliquid damma , et ego ad te interroga, si modo cepit sapor a nares lustrum.”

The smile faded a little bit, giving way to motherly sternness, faced with the first bit of (but barely the last) genuine sarcasm piece I would bestow upon the Queen Mother, her throat cleared and her voice strong and commanding upon speaking.

“Ego sum ​​mater tua, tu scis. Obsecro vestrum lingua carus. Sunt electi estis ad commoriendum et vestes quas ascendunt, gratias tibi valde.”

“Tu respice in ipso caperet eos vestimenta sua, regina et mater mea. Ipsi vero consideraverunt, ipsum regium.”