power-systems

Build it. Test it. Then, Fly it.

Hundreds of pieces of rockets, rocket engines, boosters, space capsules, launch structures and more have been built, tested and prepared to take us on our Journey to Mars. Across the country, America’s space program is hard at work to launch the Orion space capsule on its first uncrewed flight atop the powerful Space Launch System in 2018.  

But enough of the artist concepts, let’s take a look at the real components being made across the country to prepare for this milestone:

Orion Spacecraft

From testing individual bracket strength to space flight tests, the Orion team is testing every component and subsystem of the spacecraft to ensure crew safety, operational reliability and backup systems are built into the spacecraft from the ground up. To date, hundreds of tests have been conducted across the program to verify and validate that Orion’s design, manufacturing and systems integration meet the rigorous requirements for safe human space exploration.

Orion engineers have subjected the spacecraft to deafening sound blasts, Earthquake-like vibrations and hurricane-force winds in preparation for Orion’s next flight. Large structures such as Orion’s crew and service modules were tested at Lockheed Martin’s Waterton Facility in Littleton, Colorado, and our Glenn Research Center’s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Motor and engine tests have been conducted at Aerojet Rocketdyne’s facility in Sacramento, California, and Orbital ATK’s facilities in Promontory, Utah, and Elkton, Maryland.

Water impact testing of Orion’s landing capabilities were conducted at our Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, and the capsule’s massive parachute system has been tested in various landing scenarios at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona. Final assembly, integration and pre-flight testing will take place at our Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Space Launch System

Towering more than 320 feet, the Space Launch System will be the world’s most powerful rocket. Consisting of a core stage and two boosters, RS-25 engines, and the software to power it all, the initial configuration will provide 15 percent more thrust at launch than the Saturn V rocket and carry more than three times the mass of the Space Shuttle. When complete, we’ll be ready to fire up the largest and most powerful rocket ever built on it’s inaugural launch.

At our Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, a talented crew of humans with the latest in machinery is building SLS’s core stage. The core stage is the structural backbone of SLS that stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that feed the vehicle’s four RS-25 engines

For two monumental minutes in June, the SLS solid rocket boosters fired up in an amazing display of power as engineers verified their designs in the last full-scale test before SLS’s first flight. The smoke and fire may last only two minutes, but engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, and Orbital ATK in Promontory, Utah, prepared weeks — even months — in advance for that test. 

Launch Site

At our Kennedy Space Center in Florida, teams are hard at work transforming the historic Vehicle Assembly Building for the launches of tomorrow. Like a stairway to the heavens, these upgrades include the building and installation of platforms to access the new Space Launch System rocket. 

Before SLS roars into deep space from Launch Pad 39B, our Ground Systems program continues making significant upgrades and modifications to the historic launch pad to accommodate the new rocket’s shape and size. 

To make room for this new generation of rockets, workers took down the gantry that stood in support of the Space Shuttle program for 30 years and replaced it with, well, not much really. But that was the idea. Whenever SLS heads out to the pad in the future, it’s going to bring its support structure with it. With that in mind, Pad 39B will provide all the fluids, electrical, and communications services to the launch platform.

All of this work is essential to get SLS flight ready before it’s maiden voyage and is an important step on our Journey to Mars.

Next Steps

The work happening across the country is preparing us for the first flight of SLS and Orion in 2018. That first, uncrewed test flight is critical to paving the way for future flights that will carry astronauts to deep space, including on a journey to Mars.

Ultimately, the SLS maiden flight will help us prepare for future human missions. During this flight, currently designated Exploration Mission-1, the spacecraft will travel thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of about a three-week mission.

It will launch on the most powerful rocket in the world and fly farther than any spacecraft built for humans has ever flown. Orion will stay in space longer than any ship for astronauts has done without docking to a space station and return home faster and hotter than ever before.

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com

thestar.com
Toronto Police watchdog to review police use of strip searches
“I’ve had enough,” Gerry McNeilly, the independent police director, said in an interview Tuesday. “There is no regard being given to the rules.”

A Ghanaian man with limited English forced to stand naked from the waist down after three Toronto officers performed an unlawful public strip search in broad daylight.

A Toronto beat cop testifying in court that he strip searched “hundreds” of people naked, wrongly believing it was standard procedure.

An unconstitutional search by an officer who forced a man to drop his pants, prompting an Ontario judge to call out “troubling systemic issues” with strip searches at one Toronto police division.

Despite a 15-year-old Supreme Court ruling declaring strip searches “inherently humiliating and degrading” and setting strict limits on when they can be performed, unlawful strip searches continue in Ontario — prompting tossed criminal charges, civil lawsuits and complaints to the province’s police watchdogs.

So many cases of unjustified strip searches have been brought to the Office of the Independent Police Review Director (OIPRD) that Gerry McNeilly announced Tuesday he is using his office’s greatest power to launch a systemic, province-wide review of police strip search policies and practices.

“I’ve had enough,” McNeilly, the independent police director, said in an interview Tuesday. “There is no regard being given to the rules.”

The systemic review — only the fourth initiated by the OIPRD — is the culmination of a years-long pursuit by McNeilly and other critics to see officers follow the law set by the 2001 Supreme court case.

The landmark ruling states strip searches can only be conducted when there are reasonable grounds, such as looking for evidence related to an arrest or weapons. The searches cannot be employed “routinely,” Canada’s highest court ruled.

Nonetheless, Toronto police statistics show strip searches were performed 20,152 times in 2013 — one out of every three arrests. Meanwhile, evidence such as drugs was located in just over one per cent of those searches.

Continue Reading.

all my tumblrinas know the siliness of individual problematic celeb culture though… imagine if the systems of power which oppress were targeted instead of individual celebs for microaggressions so that tabloid magazines and articles can $$$ELL  😩 😩 😩

From testing individual bracket strength to full-up space flight tests, the Orion team tests every component and subsystem of the spacecraft to ensure operational reliability, backup systems and crew safety are built into the spacecraft from the ground up. To date, hundreds of tests have been conducted across the program to verify and validate that Orion’s design, manufacturing and systems integration meet the rigorous requirements for safe human space exploration beginning with Orion’s first uncrewed flight scheduled to launch atop NASA’s powerful Space Launch System rocket in 2018.  Orion engineers have subjected the spacecraft to deafening sound blasts, Earthquake-like vibrations and hurricane-force winds in prep for Orion’s next flight. Large structures such as Orion’s crew module and service module have been tested at Lockheed Martin’s Waterton Facility in Littleton, Colorado and NASA’s Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio.  Various motor and engine tests have been conducted at Aerojet Rocketdyne’s facility in Sacramento, California, and Orbital ATK’s facilities in Promontory, Utah, and Elkton, Maryland.  The massive parachute system has been test in various landing scenarios at the U.S. Army’s Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona and final assembly, integrating and pre-flight testing takes place at NASA Kennedy’s Space Center in Florida.

Watch on noam-chomsky.tumblr.com

 The most important intelectual alive today

Noam Chomsky - “Power Systems” (Full Talk + Q&A)

They’re horrible, but they’re also interesting. They tell us a lot about American ideology. The drone attacks are not a secret. There’s much we don’t know about them, but mostly they’re not a secret. The Pakistani population is overwhelmingly opposed to them, but they’re justified here on the grounds that the Pakistani leadership covertly agrees. ‘Fortunately’ for us, Pakistan is so dictatorial that they don’t have to pay much attention to their population. So if the country is a brutal dictatorship, it’s great, because the leaders can secretly agree to what is overwhelmingly opposed to it. Pakistan’s lack of democracy is considered a good thing. And then in an adjacent newspaper article you read, “We’re promoting democracy.” It’s what George Orwell called “doublethink,” the ability to have two contradictory ideas in mind and believe both of them. That’s almost a definition of our intellectual culture. And this is a perfect example of it. Yes, the bombing is fine, because secretly the leadership agrees, even though they have to tell the population they’re against it because the population is overwhelmingly opposed.
—  Noam Chomsky, Power Systems: Conversations on Global Democratic Uprisings and the New Challenges to U.S. Empire (2013) - asked about drone strikes, in this newly released collection of interviews.
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“In our nation right now, there’s a lot of supernatural breakthrough that we need.Systemic racism is a real issue… And you see when we preach about Goliath so often we make it a personal issue - your addiction, your struggle. But I was reading it this time, and the Lord showed me that Goliath wasn’t a personal issue - it was a national issue that kept the whole nation gridlocked in fear… Don’t think that just because you can’t effect something at the highest level of power that God can’t use you in a great way. David wasn’t even in the army - and he won the war. I said he wasn’t even in a uniform, he didn’t even have a weapon that was fit for combat, and he’s the one that brought down the giant!”

- Steven Furtick

reactionaryfuture.wordpress.com
Constitutional Sovcorp…What?
Over here on Reactionfuture, I am staking a claim to a conceptual system which is inherent in the Moldbugian theory. This is that governmental systems can be broadly split into two groups. One such…

“These two groups are of course 1) secure power systems in which no division and competition between power centres is in place, and authority flows down, and 2) unsecure power systems in which power is constrained and balanced.”

“Of the first group, the last incarnation on the political stage would seem to me to have been Tsarist Russia. Other such examples included the East India Company and other various charter companies of the Empire, all of which was covered by Moldbug. These political structures are in possession of very clear structure, a set direction of authority, and no division of power against itself, or constraint by sections of the same governance.”

“Of the second group, we have The Republics following the American War of independence and the French Revolution, Communist states, socialist states, Fascist states and every state in the world at present except the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia, the first of which is still subject to “checks and balances” and the second is murky politically (it will be interesting to see a formally constitutional KSA.) These all belong in the same family tree.”