power displays

10

Seduction by Cyril Porchet

Looking at the gorgeous, dramatic images of Baroque churches in Cyril Porchet’s series, “Seduction,” you might mistake the photographer for a religious man. But Porchet is more interested in the power the photos represent than the religious ideology. His intention was to explore the seductive power of display. What is extraordinary is how much you lose all sense of perspective and depth, such is the overabundance of detail. 

Okay idk about anyone else, right, but from the few scraps we got about Helion in ACOTAR/ACOMAF I was expecting…a wildly different character. Like he was described as ‘Helion Spell-Cleaver’ and was from the Day Court with their thousand libraries and infinite knowledge. 

I was expecting this kindly, dusty ancient fae who takes 16 years to get out a single sentence and chips in occasionally on intense meetings with his Pearls Of Ancient Wisdom that makes everyone assembled hush up and listen to him because we must respect the elders when they’re this old and wise. 

What I got was a flaming bisexual, sexy toga wearing, powerful thigh displaying bastard who seems to have fucked half of Prythian. His dearest ambition in life is a foursome with Mor/Cass/Az, and he’s Lucien’s secret father like ??? I could not have been more wrong if I’d tried. 

  • Chiron: The Hunters win! For the fifty-sixth time in a row.
  • Thalia: Perseus Jackson! *storms toward him, flickering blue sparks* What in the name of the gods were you THINKING?
  • Percy: *balls fists* I got the flag, Thalia! *shakes flag in her face* I saw a chance and I took it!
  • Thalia: *yelling* I WAS AT THEIR BASE! But the flag was gone. If you hadn't butted in, we would've won.
  • Percy: You had too many on you!
  • Thalia: Oh, so it's my fault?
  • Percy: I didn't say that.
  • Thalia: Argh! *pushes him, sending a shock through him that blows him ten feet backwards into the river*
  • Thalia: *pales* Sorry! I didn't mean to—
  • Percy: *ears roaring, angrily erupts a wave from river and blasts Thalia in the face, dousing her head to toe*
  • Percy: Yeah. *growls* I didn't mean to, either.
  • Chiron: Enough!
  • Thalia: *holds out spear* You want some, Seaweed Brain?
  • Percy: Bring it on, Pinecone Face!
  • Percy: *raises riptide*
  • Thalia: *yells, a blast of lightning comes down from the sky, hits her spear like a lightning rod, and slams into Percy's chest*
  • Percy: *is thrown back, clothes burning*
  • Chiron: Thalia! That is enough!
  • Percy: *stands up and wills entire creek to rise, swirling in a massive icy funnel cloud*
  • Chiron: Percy!
  • Percy: *prepares to hurl wave at Thalia, but sees the oracle emerging from the woods and the wave crashes back into the creek*

My favorite part about listening or watching live TOP concert videos is when the audience just knows when to sing. Tyler doesn’t tell them what lyrics are next, and he doesn’t prompt them to sing. He just subtly goes silent and the crowd carries it on because they know where the lyrics fit in around the music. They’re just so familiar with these songs from late nights in their rooms, or long car rides, or while making art, that they just know how they should sound. 

And to hear it is one of the most powerful displays of unity I’ve ever experienced.

Wild Magic is Awesome

5e homebrew game, im with 2 others and the DM. My dragonborn druid has seen a few animals, but their call to Druidism was a sighting of a dragon of her scale type. She’s also EXTREMELY squishy.

DM: you encounter 4 goblins guarding an encampment.

*everyone rolls for initiative and the chaotic evil bard goes first*

Bard ooc: I use the druid as a human shield.
Me ooc: what the hell, man?!

*I want to struggle but I roll very low*

DM: you successfully hold her in front of you.
Me ooc: how many polymorphs do I have left?
DM: one, why?
Me ooc: I want to roll to transform out of panic.
DM, sighing: what will you roll?
Me ooc: animal handling.

*I roll a Nat 20. The paladin is laughing, standing by as the bard realizes his mistake.*

DM: in a display of power and impossible luck, you polymorph into… *checks my character sheet* a horse sized dragon. Just brilliant.
Bard ooc: I call bullshit. I wanna hang on.
DM: strength roll. Go. *the dm is so upset*

*bard rolls a 3 and looks at me like* I hate you so much.

Paladin ooc, laughing way too hard and choking on his pizza: oh my gOD-

Long story short I did an intimidation roll on the enemies and they fled. The bard became really racist against dragonborns from then on.

D&D: How to Use Character Arcs as a Dungeon Master

In my previous post on character arcs, I talked about how a player should determine how they want their character’s arc to begin and end. It was from a player’s perspective. But how does a DM write an adventure that will make that player’s arc happen?

First, get the information you need. Ask your players to each determine how their characters will begin the campaign and how they want them to change by the end of it. Then ask for copies of their character’s traits, flaws, ideals, and bonds. Note whether a player’s character is going to die tragically and if they are okay with that. With this information, you can give the players what I call a moral quandary, personalized for their own character’s arc. A moral quandary is giving the player two difficult options that the player must decide how their character would choose. The character should lean to one side of a moral quandary at the beginning of an adventure, but gradually start to lean the other way as their arc comes to completion. 

For instance, a cleric might be presented with a choice to kill an evildoer or merely capture them. If the cleric is heading down an arc where their ideal changes from “all life is precious” to “evil must be stopped at all costs” in their character arc is going to make very different choices in that situation depending on where they are on their arc.

Let’s figure out how we can use this info as a DM and where to put moral quandaries using a 9-point story structure. These are not an entire campaign, but you can use each point as a fixed point in the narrative; a story outline based on the characters’ arcs. Plenty of different stuff can happen between each point, but the points must happen to create a robust story.

Call to Action

The player is given an initial call to action. Essentially, a moral quandary disguised as a quest hook. Try to have a separate but related call to action for each player. Ideally, the players should refuse the call to action, as they haven’t been “changed” yet. If they play to their characters’ initial backgrounds and traits, they will refuse the call. You can even enforce this by loading your call with descriptions of how the character is feeling. “You are offended that someone would even offer something so morally reprehensible to you, despite the fact that you could use the money.”

A good-hearted rogue is starting a tragic fall arc and is offered a chance to make millions from some morally questionable actions involving an evil regime, but decides it is wrong. An innocent paladin starting a coming of age arc could be offered a chance to rise against an evil regime, but values their own safety. A studious apprentice wizard starting a corruption arc is offered power in exchange for service to an evil regime, but decides they can get power on their own.

Inciting Incident

Something happens to force the player to action, whether they are ready or not. Try to come up with an inciting incident that involves all of the players, not just one. The inciting incident can act as where the adventuring party finally meets.

The evil regime in the Call to Action ends up invading the players’ quiet suburb to enforce martial law. The players escape or fight back or else they and their loved ones die or are enslaved. The rogue decides to run from their debts by joining the party. The paladin has seen firsthand what the regime can do, and will now join the party to find someone else who can help them stop it. The wizard seeks out more power to stop the regime.

1st Plot Point

The players learn the first shreds of information about the overarching narrative of the campaign. After the inciting incident, some characters might not be convinced and want to turn back. This gives them a reason to continue onward together, as a team. There should be no turning back from the 1st plot point.

Players learn how this evil regime has been spreading across the kingdom. It still holds many mysteries, but its power is great and threatening. Its power is centered in a capital city, which the players now opt to travel to in order to find the things they currently desire.

1st Pinch Point

A pinch point is the first real display of power from the antagonist or opposing force. In D&D this should be actual combat, though it doesn’t have to be. As long as the players see firsthand what the antagonist can do to their characters, this part will add the tension/drama that it should. If you want to have a 1st Pinch Point for each character, then this display of force should directly target the player’s character arc and spark the desire to change through a moral quandary. It’s an awakening. Create tension by ending a session with this pinch point.

The players come across a thieves’ guild run by the evil regime. The rogue takes note of how rich, glamorous, and lawless the life of a criminal is to spark their tragic fall arc. The paladin realizes how deep the corruption of the world runs and sparks their coming of age arc as their innocence starts to fade. The wizard realizes how much resources the evil regime has, and wonders what sorts of power they had in mind for him sparking their corruption arc.

Midpoint

More info is revealed about the antagonist and the perception of the characters change. They have an epiphany and decide to continue onward through their arc. This can, and most likely will, happen at different times for each character and their varying arcs.

The players learn about the leader of the regime. They have been pushed to the breaking point by the regime’s forces. The rogue decides join the regime and start doing crime for the regime and acting as a double agent against the party. The paladin no longer cares about finding someone else to help them stop the regime, vowing to end it themselves. The wizard gets an unholy tome and decides to learn how to make a pact with the demon the regime mentioned to overpower the regime. They are all still heading to the capital, though now with severely divergent goals.

2nd Pinch Point

The antagonist reveals their full power and threatens the completion of the characters’ arcs. The entire party should, in general, be at their lowest moment and completely without hope. This should happen at the same time for everyone. Ideally, end a session with this pinch point to create a cliffhanger and highlight the hopelessness.

The players reach the capital of the evil regime. The rogue is faced with a moral test, where they will be offered riches and allowed to live if they rat out their adventuring party. They choose to take the offer and are betrayed by the regime’s leader and sentenced to death anyway. The paladin comes face to face with the regime’s leader after being ratted out by the rogue. They fail the encounter and barely manage to escape with their life. The wizard is also defeated and their unholy tome is destroyed in the battle. The rogue is imprisoned and the paladin and rogue escape the leader and are being hunted in the capital.

2nd Plot Point

The last piece of the puzzle has come together in the second plot point. The characters finish their arc and learn how to overcome the antagonist. This can happen at different points and doesn’t have to happen quickly. For a tragic character, this is the part where they finally meet their end. Tragic characters fail to change or their change is self-destructive and they fail to overcome the antagonist of the story (tragic, isn’t it?). Think of this part as a moral quandary that characters’ finally “know the answer” to, as far as their character arc is concerned.

The rogue tries to escape, succeeds, but heads back to the thieves’ guild instead of his adventuring allies, and they ultimately betray and kill him. The paladin’s innocence is shattered and they gather rebel forces over time to take on the regime’s leader, becoming a leader themselves. They also find an unlikely ally in the wizard, who has finally succumbed to evil. The wizard still doesn’t know how to summon the demon, but they have already gotten a taste of evil’s power by performing vile rituals on captured regime members and will now use their power for vengeance against the regime’s leader.

Climax

The characters finally face off with the antagonist. The promise set out at the beginning of the campaign is fulfilled. The characters, having completed their arcs, are now changed enough to be able to defeat the antagonist. This should be the players at their most powerful and should be the most epic battle to take place in the campaign.

The paladin’s rebel army and the wizard’s evil magic face off against the evil regime’s leader. The battle is long and epic, but the characters succeed, freeing the kingdom of the evil regime.

Resolution

The game shouldn’t abruptly end after the antagonist is defeated! There needs to be closure. The players’ characters find out the results and the aftermath of defeating the antagonist, for better or for worse. In the case of an ongoing game, you should now set up the next campaign here.

The paladin and wizard regard each other as unsteady allies who no longer have a common enemy. The wizard seeks more power, even seeking to possibly usurp the void of power left from the regime’s defeat. The paladin and their rebel army gather in defiance of the wizard. The paladin tells the wizard to leave the kingdom and not threaten anyone with their evil, else the paladin will smite them down. The wizard, not having many spells left after the battle and not being ready to face an entire army, teleports away to parts unknown with a puff of green smoke. The paladin is placed in power, and the wizard now acts as a looming threat. Perhaps an NPC and villain for the next campaign?


This character arc outline is not cut-and-dry. You should use it as a guide, not a rule. Some characters might abruptly choose to change. Some will reach different parts of the outline at different times or out of order. Some characters might waffle between two sides of their arc before deciding which side they want to be on. But the more you talk to your players about it, the easier it is to come up with a generalized plan for your campaign’s story. Heck, your story might even change from what you initially intended by the end of it (a character with a bad roll can still end up dying before even finishing their arc!) But hopefully this will aid you in making the players love their characters even more and have fun as they grow and change in your campaign’s world. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

8

 ya lit meme [1/6] locations ➝ The Queeenstrial (The Red Queen Series)

So this is a pageant….A violent one, meant to showcase a girl’s beauty, splendor—and strength. The most talented daughter. This is a display of power, to pair the prince with the most powerful girl, so that their children might be the strongest of all. And this has been going on for hundreds of years.

4

Because of reasons after the revelation trailer for the DLC. Can you feel the rushed painting because I have no time btw

This is my personal version, because I just want to kick Daud´s ass into oblivion and be gone with him. And how awesome can it be seeing the Outsider angry and displaying his powers!

Vet Tales, a-woo-oo...?

So Netflix added the 2015 Stanford Prison Experiment movie and hubby and I decided to watch it. The whole time we were turning to each other and saying “Ok but that’s what we do in basic” and “wtf how is this like basic”

Including

-regularly going by SSN/forgetting given name because we’ve adopted our surname

-punished for the sake of punishment

-emasculation upon entry and repeated emasculation throughout, notably emasculation via homophobic/transphobic assertions (now that sexism will garner an EO complaint)

-removal of identifying features aka hair and clothing

singling out deemed “troublemakers” and foster isolation between them and group

-repetition of tasks done competently just to fuck with you (there’s a scene in the movie where a character is forced to make his bed twelve times so that it is perfect while the beds next to him are BLATANTLY more fucked up than his. I felt like I was actually in basic again especially when the other prisoners tried to rush to help him to avoid punishment)

-tricky circular logic to make you wrong and them right

-mass punishment blamed on an individual to stimulate aggression at companions rather than authority

-purposeful sleep deprivation for authority amusement/displays of power

-promises they can’t hit you but does just about everything but that to make you jump, flinch, startle, or make you feel like you MIGHT get hit

-manipulation of past events by telling it their way and asserting you’re the one who’s wrong

-miserable food while assuring you it’s nutritious

-forbidding or discouraging socializing

-discouraging you from seeking higher authority or a doctor

-making you look pretty and proud for your loved ones when it counts

-assertion that there’s nothing wrong with your current situation. You’re just weak.

So like not to be morbid or anything but if you’re interested, the 2015 Stanford Prison Experiment by Kyle Patrick Alvarez is like too real for me tbh Literally me and hubby were blown away at how many times we saw common basic training practices in the movie like no joke - K

Edit: sorry for all that formatting trouble whew tumblr mobile amirite

Percy/Vex could so easily have fallen prey to the trope of a civilized man taming the wild woman. In fact, so could Vax/Keyleth; Vax is a bit bohemian, but Keyleth is an outright force of nature. Instead, both men celebrate their SO’s skill and power. Percy engineers items that only Vex can use, then elevates Vex to a prestigious social rank that will garner her more respect than her predecessor based on her abilities. Vax gets outright sprung at Keyleth’s every display of power, and wants nothing more than to live in the city where she is the most influential person.

Really no point to this. I just live for these kinds of het couples.