postdigital

4

15 Amazing Designs That Were Impossible 15 Years Ago | Wired.com

Post-digital is a confusing phrase. It’s hard to know what people mean when they throw it around—are we done with digital? What does digital even mean anymore? The definition is blurry. But to Ron Labaco, post-digital is less about a definition than it is about a mindset. Labaco, a curator at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York City, has put together a massive exhibition of digitally fabricated works from 2005 to present day for the recently opened Out of Hand: Materializing the Postdigital.

The collection of more than 100 works is a comprehensive survey of design pieces and works of art that illustrate Labaco’s point—which is that over the past decade, there’s been a shift in the way that we talk and think about digital fabrication. Meaning, as technology becomes more ingrained in our daily lives, we’re moving away from a preoccupation with the technology itself into discussions about how it can be used and applied. In other words, we’ve entered the post-digital era. “These technologies are now being utilized as tools,” Labaco explains. “So it’s part of the toolkit as much as a chisel or as much as a paintbrush.”

Possibilities all around us, ever expanding. 

PostDigital - Wiki

Postdigital is a term which has recently come into use in the discourse of digital artistic practice. This term points significantly to our rapidly changed and changing relationships with digital technologies and art forms. It points to an attitude that is more concerned with being human, than with being digital. If one examines the textual paradigm of consensus, one is faced with a choice: either the “postdigital” society has intrinsic meaning, or it is contextualised into a paradigm of consensus that includes art as a totality. Either way, Roy Ascott has clearly demonstrated that the distinction between the digital and the “postdigital” is part of the economy of reality.

Kim Cascone uses the term in his article The Aesthetics of Failure: “Post-digital” Tendencies in Contemporary Computer Music. He begins the article with a quotation from MIT Media Lab cyberpundit Nicholas Negroponte: “The digital revolution is over.” Cascone goes on to describe what he sees as a ‘post-digital’ line of flight in the music also commonly known as glitch or microsound music, observing that 'with electronic commerce now a natural part of the business fabric of the Western world and Hollywood cranking out digital fluff by the gigabyte, the medium of digital technology holds less fascination for composers in and of itself.’

In The Future of Art in a Postdigital Age Mel Alexenberg defines “postdigital art” as artworks that address the humanization of digital technologies through interplay between digital, biological, cultural, and spiritual systems, between cyberspace and real space, between embodied media and mixed reality in social and physical communication, between high tech and high touch experiences, between visual, haptic, auditory, and kinesthetic media experiences, between virtual and augmented reality, between roots and globalization, between autoethnography and community narrative, and between web-enabled peer-produced wikiart and artworks created with alternative media through participation, interaction, and collaboration in which the role of the artist is redefined.

In Art after Technology Maurice Benayoun lists possible tracks for “postdigital” art considering that the digital flooding has altered the entire social, economical, artistic landscape and the artist posture will move in ways that try to escape the technological realm without being able to completely discard it. From lowtech to biotech and critical fusion - critical intrusion of fiction inside reality - new forms of art emerge out of the digital era.

More recently, the notion of postdigital is emerging as a term that describes the creative exploration of our relationship to the computer age as we move into a time of global remixing, intertwined economies, population certainty and planetary limits.

Giorgio Agamben (2002) describes paradigms as things what we think with, rather than things we think about. Like the computer age, the postdigital is also a paradigm, but as with post-humanism for example, an understanding of postdigital does not aim to describe a life after digital, but rather attempts to describe the present-day opportunity to explore the consequences of the digital and of the computer age. While the computer age has enhanced human capacity with inviting and uncanny prosthetics, the postdigital may provide a paradigm with which it is possible to examine and understand this enhancement.

Productive Interaction + Social Media by Hunter

 

In Phil Van Allen’s paper, Productive Interaction he states:

“Productive interaction is a recasting of the author/designer’s position in relation to the audience. Instead of laying out a linear narrative in an enveloping experience, the productive interaction designer frames an exploration of a meaning space, making sure the audience has the affordances to create their own ‘take’.”

More found here: 

Productive Interaction

2013: The Seeds of a Shift Toward "Postdigital"

It is important to understand art because art imitates life. Many who follow art are bound to understand how the technological world we live in is shaping our understanding of reality as we have perceived it. The definition is the following: 

Postdigital is a term which has recently come into use in the discourse of digital artistic practice. This term points significantly to our rapidly changed and changing relationships with digital technologies and art forms. It points to an attitude that is more concerned with being human, than with being digital. If one examines the textual paradigm of consensus, one is faced with a choice: either the “postdigital” society has intrinsic meaning, or it is contextualised into a paradigm of consensus that includes art as a totality. The distinction between the digital and the “postdigital” is part of the economy of reality.

I love that phrase, “the economy of reality.” It fits in well to the fact we no longer live in a world that is digital. Marketers will be quick to note that there is no such thing as digital marketing but marketing in a digital world. I’ll take it even one step forward in the accelerating pace of our post-futurist era, we don’t live in a world of digital marketing because beginning in 2013 we’ve now leapt into the era of being human based on our relationship with technology.

This is the essence of the postdigital era. If we look at the most emerging trends, surely they deal with innovation but most deal with human connection and trying to embrace a better future for the world at large. 

As MIT Media Lab cyberpundit Nicholas Negroponte pointed out: "The digital revolution is over.“ With electronic commerce now a natural part of the business fabric of the Western world and Hollywood cranking out digital fluff by the gigabyte, the medium of digital technology holds less fascination for composers in and of itself. This brings communication swiftly into a new era. How does one connect in digital but fast track this to a feeling of human connectedness? Those who can answer or provide this experience will be the one’s to watch for the remainder of 2013 as the internet of crowdfunding replaces the fascination with social sharing.

Like the computer age, the postdigital is a paradigm, but as with post-humanism for example, an understanding of postdigital does not aim to describe a life after digital, but rather attempts to describe the present-day opportunity to explore the consequences of the digital and of the computer age and how that intersects with humanity. While the computer age has enhanced human capacity and enablement, the postdigital may provide a paradigm with which it is possible to examine and understand this enhancement. To almost make us human again in interaction with communication devices to provide that utility.

For companies that can tie into this postdigital zeitgeist, they have the ability to tap into the true feelings of humanity as it will evolve into 2014.

“ Digital technologies are successful tools in contemporary design. Their ascent, however, is a continuation of well-tried and reliable analog processes. No matter whether paper or digital approach — the designer organizes elements by hand. She devises aesthetic rules for her work and plays around with them until she achieves a final product.

At this point, generative design comes in and sets out to generate products through digital tools programmed by the designer. The individual impulse triggers a chain reaction of processes depending on a set of mathematical rules. This is a useful feature for designers since it serves as a conceptional pathfinder towards the final product.”

Post-Digital Architecture

Sat on my first review of a post-digital architecture (or at least, first self-consciously post-digital). Will the teleology ever stop?

See also: “Post-digital: a term that sucks but is useful“

“Cascone and Andrews considered the notion of ‘post-digital’ primarily as an antidote to techno-Hegelianism. The underlying context for both their papers was a culture of audio-visual production in which ‘digital’ had long been synonymous with ‘progress’: the launch of the Fairlight CMI audio sampler in 1979, the digital audio CD and the MIDI standard (both in 1982), software-only digital audio workstations in the early 1990s, real-time programmable software synthesis with Max/MSP in 1997. Such teleologies are still prevalent in video and TV technology, with the ongoing transitions from SD to HD and 4K, from DVD to BluRay, from 2D to 3D – always marketed with a similar narrative of innovation, improvement, and higher fidelity of reproduction. In rejecting this narrative, Cascone and Andrews opposed the paradigm of technical quality altogether.“

http://www.aprja.net/?p=1318

s a c r e d a n d t h e p r o f a n e

I thought of the character Cosette from Le Misérable back when I was shooting this in 2011. The spirit can triumph with passion over evil and suffering. In one story, the sacred and the profane. hand in hand.

photo batalles.com
#passionphotography
#abstract #postdigital
making art & feeling alive!