post plot

rosendia  asked:

Hi! I know you've answered this before, but basically I don't know how to advance my story. I've been obsessed with this idea of a cyberpunk, dystopia world centred around a government experiment gone bad? Like, a homeless girl agrees to be experimented on as a test human weapon, but it goes wrong somehow... I don't know, but it's stuck in my head, you know? I have the idea, but no real plot. How do you best recommend bringing that plot to life and developing it in my head?

Hiya! Thanks for your question! You’ve got a great story concept that sounds really intriguing.

It sounds like you need to take the time to really submerse yourself in your story. You’ve got the basic premise, now how to turn it into an actual story.

Try using your main character to create a plot. What do they want? What are their values? Now, put the character on a quest to get what they want where those values are challenged. Or have them get what they want, but give them drastic consequences that they must deal with.

Consider the Hunger Games, all Katniss wanted was to protect her family, so she volunteers to take Prim’s place in the Hunger Games. Katniss ends up competing in her place and becomes the face of a revolution against the Capital.

You can do something similar with your story. Your character needs a goal. That goal can be anything, survival, revenge, just use your imagination.

Brainstorm ideas for plot twists and sub-plots. Just write down random words if that’s all you can think of.  You can work them together to come up with a good plot for your story.

And you can always check out prompt blogs to help you come up with a specific plot for your story.

Thanks again for your question. If you need help with anything else writing-related, feel free to send in another ask. Happy writing!

- Mod Kellie


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

so, uh.. reply to this post w/ ur favorite ep of season 3 thus far and why??

hi, hey, hello ! my name is christina and im from the est ! i love pugs + harry potter with my whole heart ! im super excited for this rp bc it looks hella fun and developmental and im so happy i was accepted wowow, below the cut is everything u need to know about my bby, june. pls plot with me !! i love every and any plot u bring me i promise.

ok so june was born and raised in a seaside town aka brighton, england so she does have a little bit of an accent.  her parents met there bc her dad was a fisherman and fell in love w/ her mom who worked at one of the local restaurants and the rest was history! june only has one brother and thats it..!! but she moved to the states when she turned 16, so her accent is a little bit faded but still kinda there??? ok moving on to facts about my bby.

  • her major is marine biology!! she lived in a seaside town and was always on the boat with her dad and loved learning about the different species in the water ever since she was a little girl. sunday afternoons on the boat with her dad was her fave thing in the entire world. she knew almost every fish that lived in the waters..
  • other than her love of the water, shes a v humble girl ! her label would be the benevolent which means well-meaning & kind & caring !
  • she sees the absolute best in people which can often result in her being naive and ppl taking advantage of her jsdhfjsdhfdhs
  • june was ALWAYS on the water with her dad..she never spent time w/ her friends in school outside of school. when she moved to the states at 16, she moved to portland maine which is another boat town and still spent most of her teenage years on the boat with her dad which resulted in her not rlly having much of a social life at school..she had like maybe two friends but she never partied or anything like that
  • idk if im allowed to say her secret or not????? but if im not…then this wont be her secret…but ik for a fact that shes a virgin bc she just never rlly got exposed into anything like that such as drugs and such so shes very innocent
  • wow this is all i have rn and if u read any of this ur a blessing!!! but pls come plot with me !!!! <333 i promise i wont be as lame as this post was and ill do anything ya wanna do im such a plot luvr

life-of-a-feminist  asked:

five steps for not writing a boring story? i can never ever write something that doesn't end up boring ๐Ÿ˜‚

Hiya! Thanks for your question. Writing an engaging story is complicated, but it can be done.

First off, there are so many aspects to writing a gripping story. Honestly, it can’t be done in five steps (and certainly not in one blog post). To prevent a boring story you need strong characters, an exciting plot, good pacing… the list goes on and on.

So rather than type out a 3000+ word response, I’m going to give you a mini-masterpost of the key aspects of writing a non-boring story with links to other LGF posts. Here you go:

How Not to Write a Boring Story:

Descriptions:

How to Write Better Descriptions

Showing vs Telling

How to Create Interesting World-Building

Dialogue:

How to Create a Unique Character Voice

Writing Unique Dialogue

How to Prevent Your Story from Being Dialogue-Heavy

Characters:

What Do You Do When Your Main Character Doesn’t Jump Off the Page?

Three Types of Character Traits

Writing Character Arcs

Plot:

How to Make Your Conflict Less Plain

The Element Every Story Needs

How to Avoid Unnecessary Scenes

Pacing:

Why Your Story Feels Too Fast

How to Pace a Scene More Quickly

Pacing Through Details

Beginning:

What to Write in a First Chapter

How to Avoid Info Dumps in the Beginning

10 Ways to Start Your Story

Middle:

How to Build-Up to a Climax

Plotting the Middle

Creating and Maintaining Tension

End:

Traits of a Strong Ending

Examples of Narrative Endings

Dual Duties of Chapter Endings

Misc.:

What Aspects Make a Good Story?

The Four Horsemen of the Bore-Apocalypse

Thanks again for your question! If you need any more writing advice, feel free to send in another ask! Happy writing!

- Mod Kellie


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

anonymous asked:

Michael, how did you think of your YouTuber name? :0c

He suggested the name to me and I guess it sorta stuck-? 

I wasn’t very popular then, obviously, so I didn’t use the account as much, but I made the YouTube channel during the summer after my junior year in high school. So, that was about four years ago. 

Wow… four years. I can’t believe it. It feels so long ago, haha. But it still hurts like it was yesterday.

anonymous asked:

How many types plot structures are there and how are they used?

Hiya! Thanks for your question! Plot structures are important for creating a good story.

There’s an infinite amount of plot structures depending on the story you’re telling. Some types are better than others within certain genres. Here are the most common plot structures, and how they’re used:

The Four Main Plot Structures:

Freytag’s Pyramid:

Also known as dramatic structure, this is the most simplistic of plot structures, and probably the one you were taught in elementary school. In this type of story structure, the climax falls in the middle, and the latter half of the story consists of falling action and the resolution. This was developed to analyze Greek and Shakespearian plays that use a five-act structure.

Why it’s good: It allows authors to explore the consequences of one’s actions. It’s also good for story analysis.

Why it’s bad: Long resolutions get boring fast. Modern novels don’t use this because no one wants to read a story where the villain is defeated in the middle.

When to use it: Children’s books and short stories

It’s good to use in children’s books because the goal of most children’s books is to teach kids a lesson. Using Freytag’s Pyramid gives writers the chance to teach kids the consequences of doing something wrong (lying, bullying, etc.). It works in short stories because the limited length prevents the denouement from being too long and boring the reader.

Examples: Any of Shakespeare’s plays

The Fichtean Curve:

This is what most modern novels use, no matter the genre. The Fichtean Curve features a varying number of crises (or mini-climaxes) within the rising action to build up to climax about two-thirds of the way through the story. The falling action is short and used to wrap up loose ends or establish a new way of life for the characters.

Why it’s good: Putting crises throughout the story will keep readers hooked until the end. It also helps to keep good pacing. Despite being frequently used, this structure is loose enough that anyone can use it and make it unique for their own story.

Why it’s bad: Too much action can be overwhelming. This structure also doesn’t work well with certain story types such as Voyage and Return, Rebirth, or Comedy.

When to use it: Action-packed stories, Overcoming the Monster plots, or Quest plots

Examples: Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, World War Z by Max Brooks, or Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

The Hero’s Journey:

Another common plot structure that is seen in modern novels (especially western literature), and can be combined with the Fichtean Curve. Often, modern novels are a combination of the two. What makes the Hero’s Journey unique is that the protagonist must go through a literal or figurative death that completely transforms them. The death is usually, but not always, the climax of the story. Another key difference in The Hero’s Journey is that the protagonist must atone for their past rather than overcome it or move on without going back.

Why it’s good: Allows for great character development in character-strong stories.

Why it’s bad: Nearly every western novel, film, or TV show (successful and unsuccessful) uses this plot structure. It’s a little overdone, but if you can put a good personal twist on it, it can work out just fine.

When to use it: First-person stories, stories with small casts, Voyage and Return plots, or Rebirth plots

Examples: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan, or Divergent by Veronica Roth

In Media Res

Latin for “in the middle of things”, In Media Res is a unique plot structure. Rather than start with an exposition that builds up to the action, In Media Res starts right in the middle of the story. If you were to start your story at the second or third crisis point of the Fichtean Curve, you would get In Media Res.

Why It’s Good: Dropping people in the middle of the action will hook the right from the beginning.

Why It’s Bad: Starting with the action can be disorienting for readers. Make sure you fill in the backstory as the plot moves on.

When to Use It: Stories with small casts, Crime plots, or Mystery plots

Examples: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen, The Lord of the Flies by William Golding, or The Iliad by Homer

There are plenty more plot structures, but these are the main four, and all others are based off these in some way. Keep in mind that most stories use a combination of these plot structures, so you don’t have to stick to just one.

Thanks again for your question! If you need help with anything else writing related, feel free to send in another ask. Happy writing!

- Mod Kellie


If you need advice on general writing or fanfiction, you should maybe ask us!

givenchy & gold, part i (m.)

;pairing โ€” jungkook/reader

;warnings โ€” sex | implied exhibitionism | mild dom/sub tones | if uโ€™ve got a praise kink then ur gonna love this | mentions of daddy kinks | instances of spankingย 

;summary โ€” youโ€™re the supervisor of the clothing department with a lot of useless lingerie knowledge, jungkook is the jewelry departmentโ€™s defiant hot boy who flirts in wristwatch brands. basically an upscale retail au, but with lots of implied under-the-counter sex. and when an opportunity presents itself to fuck each other in the bossโ€™s office after hours, youโ€™re both too hot for each other to say no.

;word count โ€” 20k im so sorry

part i | part iiย | drabbles

Keep reading

I have an idea for the next Disney movie. It’s about a young Chinese princess who falls in love with an enchanted talking suit of armor.  Are all of the supporting characters talking cats and a tiny, sassy panda? Why yes, yes they are.  Do the talking cats have multiple musical numbers? Um…duh. Is the villain a dark sorcerer who uses his wicked alchemic arts to disguise himself as a tall, handsome prince to trick the young princess into thinking she might really be in love with him, even though he’s actually a two-foot-tall blond gremlin? Seems likely.  In the end, does the princess find a way to break the spell and turn the armor back into a real boy? Well, it is a Disney movie.

Plotting a Series

I’ve gotten a question about whether the process of plotting a single book is the same as the process of writing a series. The answer is: yes, but no. They’re similar in many areas, but there are some differences.

1. In the first book you’ll want to introduce the main conflict first, and then a smaller, less important conflict a little later in. The smaller conflict will be resolved by the end of the book; the larger conflict, which is the main conflict of the series, will not.
As an example, take the Harry Potter series (I use it because it’s well-known and won’t take too much explaining). In The Philosopher’s Stone, the first couple of chapters are about Harry and who he is, how he ended up with the Dursleys, what happened to his parents – these chapters accomplish backstory by introducing Harry and his family situation, and introduce the main conflict by telling of the death of Harry’s parents, and by Dumbledore expressing uncertainty about how defeated Voldemort really is. Then, a few chapters in, after being admitted into Hogwarts, Harry finds out that someone is trying to steal the Philosopher’s Stone – the book’s short term conflict.

2. Each short-term conflict should move the long-term conflict closer to a resolution.
For example, at the end of Philosopher’s Stone, the stone is safe (the short-term conflict resolved), but it’s been discovered that Voldemort is still alive and is still trying to gain power – the stakes of the long-term conflict are raised. At the end of Chamber of Secrets, the diary is destroyed, but we have some of Voldemort’s backstory, and it seems that Voldemort is gaining power. At the end of Prisoner of Azkaban, Wormtail is introduced – this seems to have nothing to do with the main conflict, but it’s important, because it brings some of Harry’s parentage back to him (although it’s secondhand, only stories of his parents), and because Wormtail turns out to be Voldemort’s right-hand man. At the end of Goblet of Fire, Voldemort regains his body, and at this point you could argue that the long-term conflict is about halfway through its rising action; at the end of Order of the Phoenix, Harry finds out that he must kill Voldemort or be killed by him, and that only he can defeat Voldemort; at the end of Half-Blood Prince, Dumbledore (the one person Voldemort was said to truly fear) is killed, Snape’s loyalty is in major question, and Hogwarts has been overtaken – Harry decides to continue Dumbledore’s work in looking for the Horcruxes. Finally, at the end of Deathly Hallows, Voldemort is defeated and a lot of the smaller loose ends (smaller-scale antagonists like Bellatrix LeStrange and Lucius Malfoy) are taken care of. Over the course of seven books, the long-term conflict – Voldemort trying to return to power and create a society that pampers purebloods and tramples poor wizards – has been resolved.

Basically, draw a circle on a piece of paper and put your main conflict in that circle. Then draw smaller circles stemming from that bigger circle and write your short-term conflicts in those. From there continue – subplots can be drawn stemming from your short-term conflicts. (If you don’t know how to create subplots, this post may help – in it I describe the same process of mapping out possible sub-conflicts to your main conflict, but probably describe a little better.)
If you don’t know what your short-term conflicts are yet, then think of your long-term conflict as a straight line of rope – then ask yourself how you can knot up that rope. What processes do your protagonists have to go through to get to a solution, and how can your antagonists gum up the works? For example, in the Harry Potter series, the long-term conflict is that Harry has to defeat Voldemort. What gets in the way of that? I can name a few things, from various places in the books: Minister Fudge refusing to believe him when Voldemort comes back after the events of Goblet of Fire, having so much difficulty finding and destroying all the Horcruxes in Deathly Hallows, Dolores Umbridge preaching that Voldemort is not alive when in fact he is, and is growing stronger.
(There are a million possibilities for your story’s short-term conflicts, because depending on your characters’ dispositions, they could cause a few themselves – for example, one of your characters could feel they have something to prove and end up getting themselves in trouble, and the plot of an entire book could be finding and saving that character before time runs out.)

I hope this helps! - @authors-haven

0139 - signs' favorite kinks
  • aries: spontaneous sex, d/s, angry sex
  • taurus: foodplay, receiving oral, lots of foreplay
  • gemini: phone sex, dirty talk, cooperative masturbation
  • cancer: spanking, roleplay, sex toys
  • leo: exhibitionism, being filmed, erotic photography
  • virgo: humiliation, submission, public sex
  • libra: dressing up (lingerie), voyeurism, threesomes/orgies
  • scorpio: bondage, erotic torture, master/slave
  • sagittarius: one-night stands, adventurous sex, limitless sex
  • capricorn: s&m, power exchange, desire for authority
  • aquarius: cyber sex, unpredictable sex, (more) open sexuality
  • pisces: pleasing their partner, prolonged teasing, roleplay