post modern literature

I’m starting to think that sometimes two broken people can be so inflicted by the toxicity of their past, that they start to become that way to each other too. This woman made me feel strong and helped me save myself in so many ways, but she also hurt me in ways she couldn’t even acknowledge. But regardless, I still cared. I guess in a lot of ways, I was even crueler.

If anything might hurt her, silence would; and I wanted to hurt her
—  John Fowles,The Magnus

… Borges is arguably the great bridge between modernism and post-modernism in world literature. He is modernist in that his fiction shows a first-rate human mind stripped of all foundations in religious or ideological certainty — a mind turned thus wholly in on itself. His stories are inbent and hermetic, with the oblique terror of a game whose rules are unknown and its stakes everything.

And the mind of those stories is nearly always a mind that lives in and through books. This is because Borges the writer is, fundamentally, a reader. The dense, obscure allusiveness of his fiction is not a tic, or even really a style; and it is no accident that his best stories are often fake essays, or reviews of fictitious books, or have texts at their plots’ centers, or have as protagonists Homer or Dante or Averroes. Whether for seminal artistic reasons or neurotic personal ones or both, Borges collapses reader and writer into a new kind of aesthetic agent, one who makes stories out of stories, one for whom reading is essentially — consciously — a creative act. This is not, however, because Borges is a metafictionist or a cleverly disguised critic. It is because he knows that there’s finally no difference — that murderer and victim, detective and fugitive, performer and audience are the same. Obviously, this has postmodern implications (hence the pontine claim above), but Borges’s is really a mystical insight, and a profound one. It’s also frightening, since the line between monism and solipsism is thin and porous, more to do with spirit than with mind per se. And, as an artistic program, this kind of collapse/transcendence of individual identity is also paradoxical, requiring a grotesque self-obsession combined with an almost total effacement of self and personality. Tics and obsessions aside, what makes a Borges story Borgesian is the odd, ineluctable sense you get that no one and everyone did it.

—  David Foster Wallace, “Borges on the Couch, Both Flesh and Not via Biblioklept

anonymous asked:

Somebody needs to create a slideshow so that people can understand how we read into this stuff. A Comprehensive Study of Post Modern Literature, including -color archetypes -metaphor -theme -heroes journey -camera work (how scenes are framed)

that would be handy! But there are a lot of posts on the subjects you listed there already… and this is by no means a comprehensive list…

Posts I refer to on these subjects frequently, but bear in mind some of them are old, possibly out of date, incomplete:

Color Archetypes (or at least how SPN uses color):

http://mittensmorgul.tumblr.com/post/143795162745/the-supernatural-color-wheel

http://neven-ebrez.tumblr.com/post/68163476481/can-you-do-a-summary-of-the-color-symbolism-in

http://mittensmorgul.tumblr.com/post/138815520390/justanotheridijiton-extending-the-lengthly

http://mittensmorgul.tumblr.com/post/131240238640/a-purple-point-of-view-the-story-became-the-story

I don’t have any collection of posts specifically about metaphor and theme, but a huge chunk of what we write about every episode has to do with metaphor and themes.

Miraculously, my taglist page began working again. It’s by no means complete (the script that generates it only looks through the last 5000 posts), but it’s searchable, which can help find specific episode posts quickly. You might have better luck searching lizbob’s much better organized tags. :P Or just going ahead and reading her rewatch notes for every episode (currently complete through late s9).

The story over the last several seasons hasn’t been a Hero’s Journey, but a Heroine’s Journey. Not to say it’s about a woman, it’s the archetypal structure of the character’s progress, male or female.

I’ve pointed to this post by flyingfish1 over and over again as one of the most important things to keep in mind during the Carver era to understand the narrative: http://flyingfish1.tumblr.com/post/143026668768/beyond-duality-carver-era-as-a-search-for, and it lays out an excellent primer on the Heroine’s Journey (and refers to the Hero’s Journey). I also have a tag for that.

There’s also thevioletcaptain’s The Weight Of The World Is Love masterpost (posted with the warning that a lot of the linked posts there are long dead)

There are also other individual masterposts for various recurring themes, or at least collections of posts that speak to these themes (translation: I have a tag for that!):

As for camera work and the technical aspects specific to film making, that’s not really my area of expertise, but here’s some things I’ve collected over the years.

I mean, this is really just the tip of the iceberg, but it’s probably a good jumping off point. There’s at LEAST a solid month’s worth of nonstop reading there.

If that’s still not enough, have a few of my random recent meta tags grouped by theme:

This is just skimming the surface of the available reading, but there’s plenty of rabbit holes for you to run down on this list. Links leading to links leading to documentation, leading to references, leading to other meta blogs, leading to more links. Just sorting through everything here can legit keep you occupied for a few months, though.

You’re gonna need it :P

A Slippery Slope

An Eddie Redmayne one shot for @messrmoonyimagines requested here.

New Year’s Eve was always my favourite time. I didn’t care too much for Christmas, but I liked the clean slate and unknown that came with a new year. Not to mention my mom always threw huge elegant parties, and I always took the train into London to attend. I loved seeing all the dresses and sharing bringing in the new year with tons and tons of people. Her being a film director made for some interesting guests, too. My longtime friend Eddie would be there, his mom being friends with mine, and I hadn’t seen him in a while. Too bad school doesn’t stop for anybody.

Keep reading

The truth, briefly stated, is that Borges is arguably the great bridge between modernism and post-modernism in world literature. He is modernist in that his fiction shows a first-rate human mind stripped of all foundations in religious or ideological certainty – a mind turned thus wholly in on itself. His stories are inbent and hermetic, with the oblique terror of a game whose rules are unknown and its stakes everything. And the mind of those stories is nearly always a mind that lives in and through books. This is because Borges the writer is, fundamentally, a reader. The dense, obscure allusiveness of his fiction is not a tic, or even really a style; and it is no accident that his best stories are often fake essays, or reviews of fictitious books, or have texts at their plots’ centers, or have as protagonists Homer or Dante or Averroes. Whether for seminal artistic reasons or neurotic personal ones or both, Borges collapses reader and writer into a new kind of aesthetic agent, one who makes stories out of stories, one for whom reading is essentially – consciously – a creative act. This is not, however, because Borges is a metafictionist or a cleverly disguised critic. It is because he knows that there’s finally no difference – that murderer and victim, detective and fugitive, performer and audience are the same.
—  David Foster Wallace, Borges on the Couch (2004)
What to Do with That Character You Love too Much to Lose

when-theres-coffee-dance  said: hi i need some advice, hoping its not too hard for you to answer but, how you handle a supporting character that has been a idea for a long time but is kinda passive and doesn’t have much to do. i feel too attached to let go??

Lucky for you, if you love that character a lot, there’s a chance so does your reader. It’s okay to have a character in a story just because they are super lovable. Really. But what makes them a little bit better - give them something to do. Even if it doesn’t have anything to do with the plot, their wishes are a side story. They could mean something else to the reader completely. Modern novelists don’t have to have just one plot line. They can have six. Look at Jennifer Egan’s books. A Visit from the Goon Squad probably doesn’t even have one straightforward plot to begin with. It’s a great book, good enough to prove, you don’t need to cut out a character just because they aren’t relevant. Give them their own scenes and inner struggles and wishes. Show the reader who they are. If they tie into the other story, that’s ideal. But really, in contemporary literature, it’s just not necessary anymore. The main thing, if you love your character, I bet others do to. So here’s some things that are really important (because I know you all love lists): 

  • Read into your beloved character. Sure, they might be passive, but why? The reason doesn’t have to be rooted in suffering. The character could just be kind-hearted and sensitive. But do this digging. Make sure you know the character’s past. Know their present. Know what the character wants, what he needs, what he hates. Just go through it all. 
  • Make sure that your reader also sees this beloved character in the same light you do.If they think that this character is annoying, keeping them around for no reason is doing you no favors. SHOW that they are lovable for all the reasons you can’t let go. The important part is making sure that they are enough a part of the story that you can’t exactly do without them. Best way to check, ask a beta reader or a friend or a critique partner. 
  • Give this character a role. It doesn’t have to be a part of the main plot. Really. In today’s literature (post-modern/post-post-modern/contemporary or whatever the heck it’s going to be called), you can do this. If the main character’s best friend is off having her own adventures during this time that are only slightly relevant it’s absolutely fine! It’s great actually. Lord of the Rings does this too. The main plot is how Frodo goes to destroy the ring, but more than half the story is about his friends going off and doing their own things that are somewhat relevant and incredibly cool. And this is a non-contemporary example! Don’t be afraid to give this character something to do, even if it has nothing to do with anything. It could add to the theme of the story or the world or really anything. 

I hope this helps! Happy writing!

“Heart of Darkness”

By Joseph Conrad
(1899)

From my series: “Lit in Glitch”
(Why read literature when you can experience it as glitch art.)

Text > Audio > Sonified YUV Video > Animated GIF