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I feel like a subtitle to Captain America: Civil War could be Bucky and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.

🌵🌵🌵

Artisan Good: Jelly

Description: Gooey.
Game ingredients: Any fruit (1)
Difficulty: Medium, 1 day. Makes about 7 jars of jelly (250mL each)

This recipe is specifically for apple or crabapple jelly. If you want to use a different fruit, just about every box of pectin has an instruction sheet inside that will provide the accurate amount of sugar needed. The overall premise is basically the same with any fruit, though.

-16 medium apples or 56 crabapples
-½ teaspoon butter or margarine
-7 cups of sugar
-1 package of pectin

You will need a jellybag/cheesecloth and jars with rings and lids. Although, my grandmother sends us home with blackberry jelly in washed out salsa jars, so it’s not entirely necessary to have canning jars if you know what you’re doing.

I used crabapples for this recipe. I doubled it and worked with half at a time (don’t try to do it all at once if you’re doubling up; it’s kind of an exact science). Start off by cutting the apples into quarters. You can skip this step with crabapples. Throw the fruit into a large pot and fill it with water til it’s about half-way up the apples. Boil over high heat, and then bring down to a simmer. Put the lid on and let it sit for about half an hour, or til the fruit is soft. 

Mash the fruit down with a potato masher. Don’t worry about missing large chunks, just try to mash down as much as possible. Let it simmer another 5 minutes or so. 

Place the jellybag/cheesecloth in a large bowl. Carefully scoop the mashed fruit into the bag, but try not to get any in the bowl; that’ll be collecting the jelly juice. Once the bag is full, tie it tightly to a broomhandle and suspend it over the bowl. Let it sit overnight. 

With a measuring cup, spoon the juice from the bowl into a large pot, counting the number of cups of juice going in. You should have roughly 5 cups (1250mL).

Before proceeding, wash your jars, rings, and lids. Place the jars and rings in the sink and fill with very hot water, enough to fully cover the jars. Take the lids and place them in a saucepan with plenty of water on the stove. Alternate the lids between face-up and face-down, this will make them much easier to grab. Heat the water over medium heat, but don’t let it boil. 

Add the butter and pectin to the jelly juice, and heat over high heat. Stir constantly. Once the juice reaches a hard boil that can’t be stirred back down, add the sugar all at once. It’s a good idea to measure it out in a bowl beforehand. 

Stir the sugar until it dissolves, and let it come back up to a hard boil. Stir constantly while it boils for 1 full minute. Once done, turn off the stove and let it sit for about a minute while the foam rises to the surface. Skim off the foam with a knife or spoon to remove it. 

Take a jar from the sink and shake off the excess water. Place a funnel in the jar and scoop the jelly in. Do not fill the jar completely full, always leave a bit of room at the top (I usually fill to the middle thread). Wipe down the rim of the jar with a clean, damp cloth to remove any jelly. Take a lid from the saucepan (you can use a butter knife to help grab them if the water is too hot to touch) and place it on the jar. Take a ring from the sink and tightly secure it into place.

It’s important for everything to be quite hot while putting the jelly into the jars. As the jelly cools, it will create a vacuum and suck down the lid, which seals it. The lid will make a pop! sound as it does so. 

Serve on toast, pancakes, waffles, or use in baking as you please. 

-SVR

anonymous asked:

Please please I want the citation in the book about his hair because I dont remember it aaaaaa (Sorry for bad english ??)

Hey! Sorry it took me a while to get back to you. It was a combination of “Hmm is there anything else you can add?” and “I’ll get back to this later!” LOL

Anyway, here are some excerpts that give the readers some information about Laurent’s hair:

Captive Prince, Chapter 10:

Laurent’s body was a series of graceful lines under the shirt’s soft folds. Damen’s eyes lifted to the white column of his throat, and above that the golden hair, parting around the shell cup of an unjewelled ear. The image was damascened, as beaten metal. He was reading.

Prince’s Gambit, Chapter 2: 

In order to begin unlacing the garment, he had to lift his fingers and brush to one side the ends of the gilt hair, soft as fox fur. When he did so, Laurent tipped his head very slightly, offering better access.

Prince’s Gambit, Chapter 14: 

Damen looked downwards and saw the way that the white fabric shifted slightly under his thumbs. Laurent’s shirt hung on his body, a containing layer. Then Damen’s eyes travelled up along the balanced nape, to a wick of golden hair tucked behind an ear.

Prince’s Gambit, Chapter 18: 

Laurent looked like any young man who has been pressed against a battlement and kissed. The slight disturbance of the hair at Laurent’s nape was wonderful. His hand had lain there.

Kings Rising, Chapter 12: 

Damen lifted his hand, slid his fingers into the short, soft hair at the back of Laurent’s neck, cupping his head. They had never been this close, not with the fact of who he was open between them.

There was only the feel of it, the slide of his chest against Laurent’s back, the dip of Laurent’s head, and the sweat-damp hair at the nape of Laurent’s neck.

Kings Rising, Chapter 14:

The light through the trees dappled Laurent’s hair, which was longer now than it had been in the palace, and showing signs of minor disarray.

The Summer Palace:

He remembered - the steam of those other baths, the moment he had caught Laurent’s wrist in his hand. This close, he could see the wet tops of Laurent’s shoulders. Above that, the tips of Laurent’s hair were wet too, from steam or from the splash from the pitcher.

The passage from The Summer Palace (TSP) clearly states that Laurent’s hair is slightly above shoulder length. Since TSP occurs near the end of this series’ timeline AND Chapter 14 of King’s Rising (KR) states that Laurent’s hair grows throughout the trilogy, I can make assumptions of the length of Laurent’s hair from earlier.

I believe that at the beginning of the trilogy, Laurent’s hair is at/around chin level. In Chapter 10 of Captive Prince (CP), Laurent’s hair is described to be tucked behind his ear. Hair that is chin level (speaking from personal experience because mine is that short) is easily able to be tucked behind the ear. Any shorter than chin length is hard to brush behind the ear. 

Laurent’s hair is constantly described as at the nape, aka the back of the neck. Since we know that Laurent’s hair is at chin level in CP and is shoulder length in TSP, I can conclude that his hair grows throughout Prince’s Gambit (PG) and KR.

TL;DR - Laurent’s hair begins at chin level, gradually grows throughout the trilogy, and is now at shoulder level. He has “medium” length hair.

Recipe: Miner’s Treat

Description: This should keep your energy up. 

Game ingredients: Cave Carrot, Sugar, Milk

This recipe restores 125 energy and 56 health. It also gives a +3 Mining and +32 Magnetism bonus. It can be obtained after reaching Mining Level 3 and sells for 200g. 

Difficulty: Medium, about 2+ hours. Makes 7-8 lollipops, depending on size.

Disclaimer: I’ve made candy about once or twice before, a long time ago. I’m not overly skilled in candy-making, so please forgive my lack of experience. 

-2 cups white sugar
-½ cup corn syrup
-½ cup carrot juice or water
-¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
-Food colouring
-Flavouring-vanilla, mint, lemon, etc (optional)
-Margarine or butter
-Lollipop sticks

You will need a thermometer.
In a large saucepan, combine the sugar, corn syrup, water/carrot juice, and cream of tartar and stir well. The reason I put in carrot juice is because I like to try to follow the in-game ingredients as closely as possible. Milk is generally not used, but I figured I’d put in carrot juice for the Cave Carrot. 

Heat the mixture over high heat and place in the thermometer. You want it to reach 265°F, or 130°C. Even though there’s only about 3 cups worth of ingredients, the mixture will expand rapidly and bubble up, so you will need a large saucepan to contain it. 

Once the mixture has reached the required temperature, turn off the heat and pour the liquid into three or four separate bowls. Add your colours and flavours. I recommend about 1 teaspoon of colouring (I used more than that, so the colours are very bold) and ½ teaspoon of flavouring. If you’ve used carrot juice, the colours will be altered by the natural orange colour. 

Allow the candy to cool until it’s safe enough to handle, but still warm enough that it’s malleable. Before handling it, slather margarine all over your hands so the candy doesn’t stick to your skin. Take a large clump of the candy and knead it in your hands, stretching it and forming it continuously until it has a shiny sheen. Add more margarine to your hands as needed.

Next, you’ll need to turn the candy into “ropes”. Roll it between your hands and stretch it out, and then snip off pieces of the rope with scissors. The length of each rope piece is up to you, but I made mine between 6 and 7 inches. Place them on a greased cookie sheet and then repeat process with the other bowls.

Note: if you’re inexperienced like I am, it can take some time to knead and rope the candy. If one of your bowls of candy hardens during this time, microwave it for 10 seconds at a time, checking between each session. I made the mistake of putting one of the bowls in for a full minute, and re-boiling the mixture caused it to harden quickly and break off in pieces. You don’t want that. 

Once you’ve got all the candy into ropes, take one of each colour and coil them together, and then twist it tightly into a spiral. Push a lollipop stick into it, and then set it on the greased cookie sheet to dry. 

If your house is warm, you may find that you’ll have to put them in the fridge for a bit to fully set. 

A lot of the carrot flavour was cooked out during the boiling process, but if you’re like me and you’re not fond of carrot juice then I recommend using water and adding flavouring instead. Otherwise, the candy is sweet and vibrant, and the process (although kinda tedious) is pretty fun.

-SVR

2

listen these are two of my fave kaminari panels and I really think this should be a meme

mini stationery haul!

bought a new bullet journal with dotted pages, washi tape and two muji 0.5 pens. also got some stickers and a to-do list memo (not shown in pic). japan has so much cute stationery, i want it all!

The Fall Outs and Fly Offs of Confessions

When Lena confesses her love to Kara, Kara thinks ‘this is it, I’ve ruined another friendship by not loving them back.’ 

Because she knows that she likes guys, even if she hasn’t liked the ones she is friends with.

And when Lena stops by less and less, when Jess the receptionist tells her “this is actually a really important meeting” more and more, Kara is crushed.

So it’s isn’t until she brings it up to Alex and Maggie at the bar after a bit of alien ale, that she remembers.

“Well, actually,” Maggie says gently, one hand resting on her sister’s arm, “you technically could like girls too. Not that you do, but ‘I like guys’ isn’t really an argument. Has to be that you don’t like the other thing.”

Kara wants to be able to quickly say ‘well, I don’t’, but she hasn’t really thought about it. She came to Earth just as she was beginning to experience romantic feelings, and Earth has always made it seem like boys were the only option. She didn’t feel anything for any humans when she landed. They were too different, and she had too much going on.

In fact, other than celebrity crushes, when has Kara experienced feelings for anyone on Earth?

Have I loved anyone?

Oh. Yes, of course, she remembers.

On Krypton.

She had crushes on many people, just before it died.

As Kara cycles through the people she had a crush on, a boy from her lessons, one who lived across from her, a flash of long, jet black hair, the blue sun of Casador and a girl whose family was in the same tourist group as hers enter her mind.

She leans back suddenly. Alex and Maggie are mildly startled.

“I like girls.”

She stands up, knocking against the table and nearly spilling all of their drinks. 

Alex and Maggie are thoroughly startled. 

Kara stares at them intensely, not really seeing them. They exchange a quick and confused glance. 

Kara practically flies into the ceiling.

“I like Lena!”

Kara heads immediately for the door, almost crashing into a yellow fella, a table, and the waitress trying to clean it up, before she finally just super speeds out of there. 

They laugh and Alex reluctantly pulls out ten dollars and hands it to Maggie.

“I bet they’re together by the end of the week.”

Alex shakes her head. “Today.”

“You’re on, Danvers.”

medium.com
So you wanna start a podcast? A guide to getting started. (Reblog if you think it's useful)

If you ever thought about starting a podcast, but felt stuck figuring out where to being, I wrote this for you. Three years of making @wolf359radio and @focusedafshow, I’ve learned a lot and packed as much of it as I could in this epic Medium post. If you like my article, please recommend it on Medium by pressing the green heart! Also, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with anyone you think would get value from it :) Podcasting has unequivocally changed my life for the better and I hope you consider letting it transform your world, too!

Originally posted by day-glow-odyssey

PSA: Writers are artists too.

People seem to think that reposting artwork or other graphics is stealing, but that doing the same for writing isn’t? Or that you can’t ‘steal’ writing, just because it’s easy to copy? Or the written word is not as important as visual works, so stealing it is okay, and this is not true.

These are two issues I’ve noticed with this that are growing increasingly common:

  • Firstly: there is this popular trend going about, particularly with roleplayers, that they use someone else’s writing, whether it be poetry or a quote or something, in the caption section of their roleplay promotions / advertisements, but they don’t credit the source. They’ll give credit (sometimes) for the image(s) they used for the promo, but not the writing – as if one deserves credit and the other doesn’t? I’ve now seen my own work used in the caption of someone’s promo – without credit. It was just two lines from a much longer poem, but it is still MY work and while my rules state on my poetry blog people can use my writing for various things, I require credit for anything. Not doing so is STEALING and REPOSTING someone’s work. It doesn’t take much effort to put in a credit, either. If a writer doesn’t even want you to use their writing, regardless of credit, and you do so anyway, that is also stealing.

  • Secondly, and this is even more predominant: Musing blogs ( a couple in particular ) seem to think it is okay to REPOST someone else’s poetry, writing, etc. into a musing post; again, without credit, without question or permission. THIS IS NOT OKAY. Just because it’s THERE and it’s writing doesn’t mean you can do whatever you like to or with it. Musing blogs who take writing from other sources and just repost it as a musing post for others to reblog are illegitimately using other people’s work. This is theft. I have also had to deal with someone making a musing out of my writing, without credit or permission, and they just thought it was?? okay?? to take?? someone else’s writing?? and post it?? as your own???

WRITING IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AND ORIGINAL AS ARTWORK AND GRAPHICS! IT IS NOT ANY MORE ‘OKAY’ TO COPY-PASTE SOMEONE ELSE’S WRITING THAN IT IS TO UPLOAD A PICTURE SOMEONE ELSE DREW ON YOUR BLOG WITHOUT PERMISSION OR CREDIT.

Please stop thinking you can do whatever you want with whatever you find.