poplawski

Norwegians Need to Reevaluate Punishment for Oslo Shooter

 

The Wall St Journal reports that Oslo murderer Anders Behring Breivik, who’s death toll has reached 76, could get a maximum punishment of 30 years in jail.

You read that correctly- 30 years. Not 30 years for each murder, but 30 years total.

What are the Norwegians thinking and why is their sense of justice so off? To compare the extreme on this, take a look at a local case in Pittsburgh of another notorious killer who made international headlines.

On April 4, 2009, Richard Poplawski strapped on a bullet proof vest, gathered his guns and ammunition, and waited for police to arrive at his Stanton Heights home in Pittsburgh after  his mom made a domestic disturbance 9-1-1 call. He cowardly took the lives of three Pittsburgh police officers and shocked and saddened the entire Pittsburghregion. A jury of his peers decided that Poplawski should die by lethal injection.

Pittsburghers demanded justice, and justice was served. Poplawski knew what he was doing, admitted he did it, and barring a successful appeal, will be put to death like the dog he is.

Fast-forward to July 22 in Oslo, Norway. Anders Behring Breivik admits to bombing a government building in Oslo and then going on a shooting rampage on the lake island of Utoya. So far, 76 people have died. He is currently held on terrorism-related crimes, but could be upgraded to crimes against humanity.

In both situations, the killers were motivated by hate. For Poplawski, it was a paranoid fear of the government and President Obama taking away his rights; for Breivik, it was Muslim extremism that motivated his massacre that he hoped would spark a revolution across Europe.

However, what is different is how our cultures view justice. Progressive Norway is apparently much more lenient in punishment then we in the U.S.are. For terrorism-related crimes, the prison term could last up to 21 years; for crimes against humanity, Breivik could get the maximum penalty- 30 years in prison.

Could you imagine the outcry in this country if a madman killed nearly 80 people in Pittsburgh, admitted to doing it, and the only punishment he would receive was 20-30 years in prison? Breivik is 32 year old; at worst case scenario, he could be free at 62 years old.

To further understand the progressive view of the Norwegians, take a look at this quote from Oslomayor Fabian Stang, who was addressing a crowd of 100,000 in the city center who gathered to show their support for the victims.

“We are all going to punish the murderer,” Stang told the crowds. Our punishment will be more generosity, more tolerance and more democracy.”

That’s right, kill him with kindness! Battle his intolerance with tolerance! Damn him with democracy!

Was not Norway the home of the Vikings, the fierce barbarians who plundered and terrorized Europe for hundreds of years? Were their gods not of Norse tradition, which above all else held heroism and battle in the highest esteem? What happened to these hearty Norwegians that their belief in the justice system would become so passive that crimes against humanity would be 30 years of prison?

 

 When I think of “crimes against humanity,” I imagine Nazi war criminals, Stalin’s purging of the Russian people, or terror mastermind Osama bin Laden planning the 9-11 attacks. Could you imagine giving Adolph Hitler 30 years in prison for his atrocities in WWII?

Norway is lucky to have an extremely low murder rate, and while I understand that crimes like this are rare, I hope the Norwegians make a special case of Anders Behring Breivik- the death penalty was made for people like him, and it should be exercised in this case.

The Places I Land

“And seriously, the way you land above where you fell from is disgusting.” - Rob Davide

Yesterday, I was sent downtown by my boss to observe motions in one of the courthouses.  My internship is pretty relaxed so the idea was just, hey, pick a courthouse, any courthouse.  Take some notes.  See what happens.  I got a little turned around and ended up in criminal court instead of civil court where it was highly suggested I begin.

For some reason, I wasn’t dressed in a way that was remotely appropriate for court.  I wore shorts.  I don’t know why.  So obviously, I got to court and couldn’t go into any of the court rooms because I wasn’t dressed properly.  I wandered around and finally stopped to ask a policeman what I should do.  He introduced me to a judge’s secretary (who even invited me back sometime to observe despite my shorts and my nose ring!) and she told me to go “down to room 313.  They’re showing a live stream of another case there so you should be ok with what you’re wearing.”

I sat in room 313 and listened to one of the expert witnesses, a cop, talk about approximately 100 pieces of evidence including an AK47 and a shit ton of ammunition (they count every single box as evidence - Ally McBeal had not prepared me for this process).  I left after about an hour with a page full of notes on evidence presentation and a few general info tidbits I’d picked up.

…I was at the Poplawski murder trial.  The biggest one in our city in years.  Many, many years.  Because I wasn’t dressed well enough to attend somebody’s divorce proceedings in civil or theft in criminal.

Ogni buco nero potrebbe racchiudere un universo nascosto.

Per quanto ne sappiamo, potremmo stare vivendo all'interno di un buco nero. È la teoria avanzata da alcuni cosmologi che hanno modificato le equazioni della Relatività Generale di Einstein e che cambia la nostra idea di ciò che avverrebbe nel core di un buco nero.

In un’ analisi del moto delle particelle che entrano in un buco nero, Nikodem Poplawski dell’ Università del Montana di Bloomington ha mostrato, insieme ai suoi collaboratori lo scorso Marzo, che all’ interno di ogni buco nero potrebbe celarsi un universo parallelo al nostro (Physics Letters B, DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2010.03.029). Dice Poplawski:

Forse, gli enormi buchi neri al centro della Via Lattea e di altre galassie costituiscono dei varchi per raggiungere universi paralleli.

Se ciò fosse vero - e si tratta di un grosso “se” - niente può escludere che il nostro stesso universo esista all’ interno di un buco nero.

Nella Relatività Generale di Einstein (RG), i punti dello spazio che ospitano un oggetto di massa infinita come i buchi neri sono detti “singolarità”. Che la singolarità sia effettivamente un punto di densità infinita o solo una inadeguatezza matematica della RG non è chiaro, poiché le equazioni della RG non valgono all’ interno dei buchi neri. In ogni caso, la versione modificata delle equazioni di Einstein usata da Poplawski elimina del tutto il concetto di singolarità.

youtube

Janusz Poplawski sings La Cumparsita in Polish (1937)

This wonderful recording cannot be outdone for sultry moodiness. 

Using an adaptation of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, Nikodem Poplawski, of Indiana University, Bloomington, analysed the theoretical motion of particles entering a black hole.

He concluded that it was possible for a whole new universe to exist inside every black hole, which could mean that our own universe could be inside a black hole as well.

From One Thing Many

A few months ago, I read an older National Geographic article on the work of Nikodem Poplawski, an astrophyscist at Indiana University, entitled “Every Black Hole Contains Another Universe?” The idea isn’t new, in fact the 1979 sci-fi thriller “The Black Hole” arrives a similar conclusion—just with the use of trash can shaped robots and ray-guns. Poplawski on the other hand reaches his conclusion by treating the spacetime inside of a black hole as a spinning funnel rather than a static point, causing gravity to open a hole in space and time in a similar way that a sink drain forms a vortex. Due to properties of General Relativity, the outside observer sees a black hole devouring the matter and space around it, while the inside observer experiences a vast universe. He concludes that the singularity that set the Big Bang in motion may likely have been the result of a black hole in another, parent universe. Likewise every black hole in our universe may hold its own unique reality.

What resonates with me about Poplawski’s theory is how well it fits into my own view of the cosmos. As a designer, I seek out repetition; it’s a tool that grabs a viewer’s attention and is one of the fundamental properties of good design. Systems of repetition are all around us, in life, in galaxies, even in the shape of mountain ranges. Imagine a grand pasture, rolling hills, swaying grass, patches of wild flowers sprinkled throughout. What makes up that field is a systematic repetition, millions of blades grass, thousands of flowers, life sprouting then blooming then dying off, often reproducing before it does. The grass and flowers themselves all lie within the larger system, the pasture. There are many pastures on the planet earth and perhaps many earths across the universe. Systems tend to repeat themselves.

On a larger scale a cloud of gas collapses and forms a star, eventually expelling its gas to create the fuel for other stars. Time becomes the larger system. A star may collapse and create black a hole, perhaps big enough to create a new universe. The system that Poplawski describes with his equations fits so well into the observable one we all live. One thing being brought into existence by another, echoing its parent, eventually dying off, and creating a few others before it does. In this way Poplawski’s theory may not only be the preface to the story of creation, but the story itself.

Our universe may be a redundant poet, its prose repeated in the patterns it creates. An observer on a planet within it might watch the sun rise in the morning and set in the evening. He might think about how each day has a beginning and an end and how it feels so similar to the one before. The story is so obvious when you understand the subtext, the message becomes clear. A simple instruction that plays out all of creation; from one thing many and from many things, many more.

@SuperchiefGallery at @tendertrapbk is proud to present BAD COMPANY, a punk art group show to coincide with the New York’s Alright fest.

The show is free and opens Thursday April 16 at 8:00 PM with the bands start at MIDNIGHT. There are two other great kickoff shows for the fest, so we’re having the late night show.

***
Bands: (starting at midnight!)
Nandas (NYC)
Strutter (TX)
Slav (NYC)
***

Participating Artists:
Alexander Heir
Christina Gemora
Chi “RIP ERIC GARNER”
Colin Clark
Dimoni
Emil Bognar Nasdor
Emma Kohlmann
Eugene Terry
Hannah Dunne
Heather Benjamin
Jane Chardiet
Jess Poplawski
Jennifer Calandra
Keegan Dakkar
Laura Pallmall
“Mick Quade”
Mia “Mimifats”
Mike Saunders
Nathan Alexis Brown
Reed Dunlea
Sam Ryser
“Ssully”

Superchief Gallery at Tender Trap
66 Greenpoint Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11222
#tendertrapbk

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Superchief Gallery is proud to present BAD COMPANY, a punk art group show to coincide with the New York’s Alright fest.

The show is free and opens Thursday April 16 at 8:00 PM but the bands start at MIDNIGHT. There are two other great kickoff shows for the fest, so we’re having the late night show.

***
Bands: (starting at midnight!)
Nandas (NYC) https://nandas.bandcamp.com/
Strutter (TX) http://strutter.bandcamp.com/
Slav (NYC) https://slav.bandcamp.com/
***

Participating Artists:

Alexander Heir

Christina Gemora

“RIP ERIC GARNER”


Colin Clark

Dimoni

Emil Bognar Nasdor

Emma Kohlmann

Eugene Terry

Hannah Dunne

Heather Benjamin

Jane Chardiet

Jess Poplawski

Jennifer Calandra

Keegan Dakkar

Laura Pallmall

“Mick Quade”

Mia “Mimifats”

Mike Saunders

Nathan Alexis Brown

Reed Dunlea

Sam Ryser

“Ssully”

Superchief Gallery at Tender Trap
66 Greenpoint Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11222

Come check out work some of the most compelling visual artists in the contemporary punk scene. The show will be up throughout the fest and until April 25.

vimeo

Mateusz Poplawski - 2015 Rigging & Tools Reel from Mateusz Poplawski on Vimeo.

Many thanks for Sebastian and Arek. They’ve made all animations.

Sebastian Kalemba: vimeo.com/skalemba
Arek Firlit: vimeo.com/arekfirlit