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anonymous asked:

What do you know about the budgeting towards the end of the production of NGE? could you explain it?

Contrary to popular belief, the reason why the last episode of Eva looked the way they did wasn’t exactly on the budget. The schedule as you will see Anno state, had nothing to do with it, either. Anno and his writers did not have a clear idea on what the ending to Neon Genesis Evangelion would be. 

Now,  the controversial episode 26 (the one that didn’t directly address 3rd Impact, not EoE) was done in drawings and sketches (remember Rei, Asuka, Misato talking to Shinji so that he better understands reality?). Anno’s original plan for the 26th episode was for him to use spoken word rather than visual representation. However, this was rejected and so Anno had to do with something else. Anno and boarders had instead used marker sketches (rather than animation or cels) from the storyboards. Anno felt that Asuka’s seiyuu (voice actor) with these marker sketches incorporated in the last episode was “more Asuka than ever.”

Without cels, we made do by using the sketches of the storyboard in their place. It wasn’t a matter of having time to make them or not. In any event, we ended up doing without animation on cel. Cels are symbolic representations. After having drawn Asuka with a marker, as soon as Yuko Miyamura gave it her voice, it was more Asuka than ever.

https://www.gwern.net/docs/eva/1996-newtype-anno-interview

What’s really important here is that Anno didn’t go with the usage of animation cels to get the point across due to schedule. Schedule did not bear on Anno. Anno felt that using sketches could work rather than having to resort always to using the finished versions of said sketches (through animation or cels). He didn’t say this to justify not using animation cels and honestly I think using sketches in animation rather than finished products isn’t bad if it’s doing the communication of an idea right. For example, remember in End of Evangelion, when Komm Susser Tod plays and you see crayon drawings ranging in simplicity. It’s doing it’s job right, because while those drawings are being shown on screen, Komm Susser Tod highlights a sort of “life has been painful for me for long enough and I’ve had enough” sort of moment.