poor horse:(

4

This comic strip nails why poor Americans aren’t just “asking for handouts.”

America’s poor don’t have it easy.

They’re subjected to a range of false stereotypes: They’re accused of being lazy and of abusing drugs, among others. Researcher Paul C. Gorski examined these perceptions in his 2013 book, “Reaching and Teaching Students in Poverty: Strategies for Erasing the Opportunity Gap,” and found these notions aren’t based in reality.

For more striking stats on inequality in America read the full story here. 

Since my food stamps post about the woman using food stamps while wearing a north face coat is circulating again I thought I’d throw something out there. The other day I was thrift shopping and I found a north face hoodie in my size. I payed 8 dollars for a hoodie that retails for 45-80 dollars. Just goes to show that you absolutely cannot judge someone’s status by what they are wearing. And even if you do go there, being poor does not mean you are undeserving of quality items. If you saved up to buy something nice that’s going to last longer than one of those thin Walmart jackets, you deserve it and that is nobody else’s business.

Dorothy Day, one of the most important American Catholic leaders of the 20th century, had an unexpected past. Her early years included a bohemian lifestyle in New York, an abortion, and a child born out of wedlock. She later co-founded the Catholic Worker Movement, a pacifist, faith-based movement for social change that still exists today. Day led the Catholic Worker Movement from its beginnings in the Great Depression through the Vietnam War era. Day fed thousands of people, wrote newspaper columns, novels and plays, was arrested several times in protests, chain-smoked for years, and at times lived on farms as part of an agrarian, back-to-the-land strand of the Catholic Worker movement. She died in 1980 and is now a candidate for sainthood in the Church. 

A new biography that illuminates Day’s activism and her complex personal life comes from someone who knows both well. Writer Kate Hennessy is Day’s youngest granddaughter, and she relied on family letters and diaries, interviews, and her own memories for her new book, Dorothy Day: The World Will be Saved by Beauty.

An ‘Intimate Portrait’ Of Dorothy Day, The Catholic Activist With A Bohemian Past

The wealthiest 1% of Americans live 10 to 15 years longer than the poorest 1%

  • Being wealthy means staying healthy, according to a new series of studies.
  • These studies, in medical journal The Lancet, explored how economic inequality exacerbates health inequality. 
  • According to the survey, the wealthiest 1% of Americans live 10 to 15 years longer than the poorest 1%. But the advantages of income go beyond just being the 1%. Read more. (4/8/17, 12:29 PM)

Outside of images that the Care Bears would find insipid, “Money can’t buy happiness” is what middle-class people tell each other when someone is trying to decide between two different jobs. “I make 70k right now and the new gig only plays 60k, so I wouldn’t be able to travel as much. But I’d have more free time to play Ultimate, the benefits are better, and there’s no way my new manager could be any worse than my current one.” That’s an important decision to the person making it, but they’re debating between two different kinds of comfort. It’s safely assumed that the money they will need to exist will always be there. It would be nice to have more – to be able to go to more restaurants or to justify buying a second Roomba because deep down you know that the first one is lonely – but there’s always enough to keep the lights on and the kitchen stocked.

You may have seen the study that claimed $70,000 a year is the ideal salary – after that, more money generally doesn’t make you happier. Well, that’s great news for people hovering around that benchmark, but if you’re poor, more money will abso-fucking-lutely make you happier. More money means healthier food, or a chance to get out of the house and have some fun. It can mean knowing the rent is paid for next month, or being able to afford medication.

The middle class isn’t immune to money problems, especially if there are kids in the mix. Getting laid off at the wrong time sucks, no matter what your income is. But the middle-class people with money problems I’ve known were generally suffering from self-inflicted wounds. They had no savings because they wanted the new car or the luxury vacation. They wanted one of those experiences they were constantly told was more important than money, because the money for day-to-day necessities was always there, right up until it wasn’t.

5 Ways The Middle Class Is Taught To Despise The Poor