polygraph

‘Mr. Brightside’ Second Most Timeless Song of All Time

Polygraph has used data from Spotify to quantify how songs have and are standing the test of time.  While the entire article is well worth a read, it is noteworthy that The Killers have three tracks that could be could be considered ‘timeless’ within the parameters of the study.

The Killers’ three tracks that could be considered timeless are:

  • 2- ‘Mr. Brightside’
  • 37- ‘Somebody Told Me’
  • 153- ‘All These Things That I’ve Done’

Victims will note that these three tracks all come from The Killers’ debut album, Hot Fuss.

It’s no surprise that Hollywood displays massive inequalities (when it comes to pay, and parts available to women and to minorities). A lot of the discussion, however, has been around anecdotal evidence. Here, Polygraph takes a look at 2,000 screenplays and backs up these arguments with raw data and interactive charts. It’s staggering–and pretty depressing. Testing the claims that men speak more often than women in Disney princess films, look at 30 Disney films, including Pixar. The results: 22 of 30 Disney films have a male majority of dialogue. #polygraph #inequality #datavisualization

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THE UNIVERSE OF MILES DAVIS 

Miles Davis’ legacy, represented by every Wikipedia page that mentions him This year, Miles Davis would have turned 90 years old. 25 years after his death, he’s still synonymous with Jazz, but you can find his fingerprints on so many other ideas. 

Let’s examine his legacy by sorting through every Wikipedia page (in English) on which he’s mentioned. 

This approach not only highlights his recordings and collaborators, but also wraps our arms around everything else, such as mentions in Kendrick Lamar’s “influence” section and the “notable usage” section for Motherfucker.

http://polygraph.cool/miles/

Women don’t speak.

Photo: 2,005 Screenplays: Dialogue Broken-down by Gender. 

Who Cares About Actresses often wonders, with much frustration, why is it that women undergraduates speak up so much less in film school when often they have the more mature insights? Why do they equivocate, question themselves, and doubt their ideas when they are usually more mature than their male classmates? Furthermore, why are there so many fewer women students in film school? Hmmm… perhaps not only because they’re not seeing themselves with agency on screen, but because they literally are taught on screen: women should say less. 

So thank you for this new infographic from Polygraph breaking down the gender issue in Hollywood. It is the largest ever analysis of film dialogue looking at 2000 screenplays over a range of genres. It was made as a response to critics of the Bechdel test, who say it may not be the best indicator of gender bias. (They had previously made an infographic that showed if films passed the Bechdel test or not.Polygraph looked directly at dialogue, providing a pretty obvious look at the issues that Hollywood faces. Disney has a severe bias towards men, who receive 60% or more of lines. This is true even for the Princess movies, where obviously the leads are women. As Polygraph points out:

Even films with female leads, such as Mulan, the dialogue swings male. Mushu, her protector dragon, has 50% more lines than Mulan herself.

When a movie centers around a woman protagonist, but she has significantly less lines than the male characters, some of her presence is taken away.

Photo: Polygraph’s breakdown of Disney dialogue. 

The project also looked at how ageism affects men and women differently. Amazingly, there are more roles available to older male actors (above 42) than for younger male actors, whereas the peak age range for women actors is 22-31. 

Who Cares About Actresses acknowledges how important information like this is. Sometimes, it’s necessary to be presented with the facts and statistics in such an obvious way to really understand the magnitude of the issue. We hope that the EEOC is paying attention to this. Check out all of Polygraph’s sources here

A polygraph (lie detector) records changes in heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and the the galvanic skin response. The galvanic skin response is recorded from the hand by electrodes that measure skin conduction, or more simply, sweating. “Polygraph” means many writings and was invented by the psychologist William Marston in 1915. 

Three months before his suicide, after applying for conversion to civilian employment at NSA, [Jack E.] Dunlap admitted on a polygraph examination to having had “immoral sexual relations” with women and was moved to a “non-sensitive” position. As in the [Joseph S.] Petersen [espionage] case, NSA subsequently pointed to this finding as proof that the polygraph “works” and should be mandatory for all NSA employees, military and civilian alike. They played down the embarrassing fact that had anyone been using their eyes instead pseudo-scientific voodoo machines and obsessive fixations on “sex deviates” to identify security risks, they would have noticed long before that Dunlap had left a blindingly obvious trail. On an Army sergeant’s salary of $100 a week, he owned two Cadillacs, a baby-blue Jaguar sports car, a thirty foot cabin cruiser, and a world class racing hydroplane; he told co-workers a series of contradictory and patently fantastic stories to account for his sudden wealth, including that his father owned a large plantation in Louisiana, that he had made a successful investment in filling stations, that he owned land containing a valuable mineral used to make cosmetics, and that he had won the money as prizes in boat races. Nor did it exactly require a polygraph examination to uncover the fact that a married NSA employee who had begun dating an NSA secretary was possibly engaging in “immoral sexual relations.”
—  Stephen Budiansky, Code Warriors
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Drawing the news with digg: How To Tell If Someone Is Lying To You

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How Do Polygraph Machines Work?

Also known as ‘lie detectors,’ polygraphs are used to record an individual’s vital signs, such as breathing rate, pulse, and so forth. Check out this episode of BrainStuff to learn more about polygraphs and the art of lie detection.