anonymous asked:

Do you know where I can watch cartoons and disney movies dubbed in arabic ?


check these links out:

~ And there are many more cartoons to watch, if you need more let me know :)

Have you checked out my YouTube channel yet? 

I have been working on my language learning study blog for over a year now, and it seems to have gained a wee bit of success; so I thought it was time to diversify and start making videos. So if you enjoy my blog, then please subscribe to my new channel too for videos about studying at university, language learning and my exciting move abroad. I’m super nervous about doing this, so any interaction and feedback would be really appreciated! 

anonymous asked:

Hi could u please explain the difference between 귀여워 and 귀여운?? 감사합니다

Hey! And sure, I can try my absolute best~

🔆So the simplest way to explain this would be that 귀여운 is cute in adjective form, so you use it to describe something else (noun) An example: “귀여운 강아지” or “cute puppy”. (It usually never ends a sentence but goes in front of the noun it’s describing.)

🔆귀여워 (which is still an adjective) but it’s used in a sentence similar to the way of a verb. (Meaning usually it goes after the noun, often even ending the sentence)
An example to better represent my poor explanation: “ 그 강아지가 너무 귀여워.” Or “the dog is so cute.”

I hope this answers your question and isn’t too…confusing. I have a talent of making things seem more confusing than they actually are. But this is how I distinguish a difference between the two~ Thanks for your question! ✨🤗✨

Tips to learn a new language

The 75 most common words make up 40% of occurrences
The 200 most common words make up 50% of occurrences
The 524 most common words make up 60% of occurrences
The 1257 most common words make up 70% of occurrences
The 2925 most common words make up 80% of occurrences
The 7444 most common words make up 90% of occurrences
The 13374 most common words make up 95% of occurrences
The 25508 most common words make up 99% of occurrences

(Source: 5 Steps to Speak a New Language by Hung Quang Pham)

This article has an excellent summary on how to rapidly learn a new language within 90 days.


We can begin with studying the first 600 words. Of course chucking is an effective way to memorize words readily. Here’s a list to translate into the language you desire to learn that Derek Roger suggested! :)

EXPRESSIONS OF POLITENESS (about 50 expressions)      

  • ‘Yes’ and 'no’: yes, no, absolutely, no way, exactly.    
  • Question words: when? where? how? how much? how many? why? what? who? which? whose?    
  • Apologizing: excuse me, sorry to interrupt, well now, I’m afraid so, I’m afraid not.    
  • Meeting and parting: good morning, good afternoon, good evening, hello, goodbye, cheers, see you later, pleased to meet you, nice to have met.    
  • Interjections: please, thank you, don’t mention it, sorry, it’ll be done, I agree, congratulations, thank heavens, nonsense.    

NOUNS (about 120 words)

  • Time: morning, afternoon, evening, night; Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday; spring, summer, autumn, winter; time, occasion, minute, half-hour, hour, day, week, month, year.    
  • People: family, relative, mother, father, son, daughter, sister, brother, husband, wife; colleague, friend, boyfriend, girlfriend; people, person, human being, man, woman, lady, gentleman, boy, girl, child.    
  • Objects: address, bag, book, car, clothes, key, letter (=to post), light (=lamp), money, name, newspaper, pen, pencil, picture, suitcase, thing, ticket.    
  • Places: place, world, country, town, street, road, school, shop, house, apartment, room, ground; Britain, name of the foreign country, British town-names, foreign town-names.    
  • Abstract: accident, beginning, change, color, damage, fun, half, help, joke, journey, language, English, name of the foreign language, letter (of alphabet), life, love, mistake, news, page, pain, part, question, reason, sort, surprise, way (=method), weather, work.    
  • Other: hand, foot, head, eye, mouth, voice; the left, the right; the top, the bottom, the side; air, water, sun, bread, food, paper, noise.    

PREPOSITIONS (about 40 words)    

  • General: of, to, at, for, from, in, on.    
  • Logical: about, according-to, except, like, against, with, without, by, despite, instead of.    
  • Space: into, out of, outside, towards, away from, behind, in front of, beside, next to, between, above, on top of, below, under, underneath, near to, a long way from, through.    
  • Time: after, ago, before, during, since, until.    

DETERMINERS (about 80 words)  

  • Articles and numbers: a, the; nos. 0–20; nos. 30–100; nos. 200–1000; last, next, 1st–12th.    
  • Demonstrative: this, that.    
  • Possessive: my, your, his, her, its, our, their.    
  • Quantifiers: all, some, no, any, many, much, more, less, a few, several, whole, a little, a lot of.    
  • Comparators: both, neither, each, every, other, another, same, different, such.    

ADJECTIVES (about 80 words)    

  • Color: black, blue, green, red, white, yellow.    
  • Evaluative: bad, good, terrible; important, urgent, necessary; possible, impossible; right, wrong, true.    
  • General: big, little, small, heavy; high, low; hot, cold, warm; easy, difficult; cheap, expensive; clean, dirty; beautiful, funny (=comical), funny (=odd), usual, common (=shared), nice, pretty, wonderful; boring, interesting, dangerous, safe; short, tall, long; new, old; calm, clear, dry; fast, slow; finished, free, full, light (=not dark), open, quiet, ready, strong.    
  • Personal: afraid, alone, angry, certain, cheerful, dead, famous, glad, happy, ill, kind, married, pleased, sorry, stupid, surprised, tired, well, worried, young.    

VERBS (about 100 words)    

  • arrive, ask, be, be able to, become, begin, believe, borrow, bring, buy, can, change, check, collect, come, continue, cry, do, drop, eat, fall, feel, find, finish, forget, give, going to, have, have to, hear, help, hold, hope, hurt (oneself), hurt (someone else), keep, know, laugh, learn, leave, lend, let (=allow), lie down, like, listen, live (=be alive), live (=reside), look (at), look for, lose, love, make, may (=permission), may (=possibility), mean, meet, must, need, obtain, open, ought to, pay, play, put, read, remember, say, see, sell, send, should, show, shut, sing, sleep, speak, stand, stay, stop, suggest, take, talk, teach, think, travel, try, understand, use, used to, wait for, walk, want, watch, will, work (=operate), work (=toil), worry, would, write.    

PRONOUNS (about 40 words)

  • Personal: I, you, he, she, it, we, they, one; myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, yourselves, themselves.    
  • Possessive: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs.    
  • Demonstrative: this, that.    
  • Universal: everyone, everybody, everything, each, both, all, one, another.
  • Indefinite: someone, somebody, something, some, a few, a little, more, less; anyone, anybody, anything, any, either, much, many.    
  • Negative: no-one, nobody, nothing, none, neither.    

ADVERBS (about 60 words)

  • Place: here, there, above, over, below, in front, behind, nearby, a long way away, inside, outside, to the right, to the left, somewhere, anywhere, everywhere, nowhere, home, upstairs, downstairs.    
  • Time: now, soon, immediately, quickly, finally, again, once, for a long time, today, generally, sometimes, always, often, before, after, early, late, never, not yet, still, already, then (=at that time), then (=next), yesterday, tomorrow, tonight.    
  • Quantifiers: a little, about (=approximately), almost, at least, completely, very, enough, exactly, just, not, too much, more, less.    
  • Manner: also, especially, gradually, of course, only, otherwise, perhaps, probably, quite, so, then (=therefore), too (=also), unfortunately, very much, well.    

CONJUNCTIONS (about 30 words)

  • Coordinating: and, but, or; as, than, like.    
  • Time & Place: when, while, before, after, since (=time), until; where.    
  • Manner & Logic: how, why, because, since (=because), although, if; what, who, whom, whose, which, that.   
some french phrases ♥︎

1. À LA DÉBANDADE

À la basically means “in the style of” or “according to.” À la débandade—literally “like a stampede”— used figuratively in English to describe a disorderly or chaotic mess.

2. AMOUR FOU

an obsessive passion for someone, and in particular one that is not reciprocated. It literally means “insane love.

3. L’APPEL DU VIDE

It literally means “the call of the void,” but in practice it’s usually explained asthe bizarre inclination some people have for doing something dangerous or deadly, no matter how foolish they know it is. So when you’re standing on a beach, l’appel du vide is the voice that tells you to swim away and never come back. When standing on a clifftop, l’appel du vide tells you to throw yourself off.

4. APRÈS MOI, LE DÉLUGE

Après moi, le déluge means “after me, the flood,” and is used to refer to a person’s irresponsible or selfish lack of concern in what will happen after they have gone or moved on.

5. CHERCHEZ LA FEMME

Literally meaning “look for the woman,” cherchez la femme is used in English to imply that if a man is seen acting out of character, then a woman will likely be the cause of it—find her, and the issue will be resolved. Although the origins of the phrase are a mystery, it’s often credited to the French author Alexandre Dumas, whose crime drama Les Mohicans de Paris (1854) contains its first written record: “There is a woman in all cases; as soon as a report is brought to me I say, ‘Cherchez la femme!’”

6. COUP DE FOUDRE

Coup de foudre is the French term for a thunderbolt or strike of lightning, but it’s been used figuratively in English since the late 1700s to mean love at first sight.

7. L’ESPRIT DE L’ESCALIER

Known less romantically as “staircase wit” in English, l’esprit de l’escalier is the frustrating phenomenon of coming up with the perfect observation or comeback after the opportunity to use it has passed.

8. HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE

“Shame on him who thinks badly of it,” warns the old Norman French saying honi soit qui mal y pense, which has been used in English to discourage preemptively or unjustly talking something down since the early Middle Ages.

9. MAUVAIS QUART D’HEURE

As well as having your fifteen minutes of fame, you can also have your mauvais quart d’heure(or your “bad quarter of an hour”)—a brief but embarrassing, upsetting, or demoralizing experience.

10. MAUVAISE HONTE

Mauvaise honte literally means “bad shame.” In English it’s often used simply to mean bashfulness or extreme shyness.

11. MISE EN ABYME

the phrase mise en abyme (“put into the abyss”) is used to refer to the mind-boggling visual effect of a recurring image containing itself into infinity—like a mirror reflected in a mirror.

12. NOSTALGIE DE LA BOUE

The phrase nostalgie de la boue was coined by the French dramatist Émile Augier in 1855, who used it to refer to a person’s fondness for cruel, crude, depraved, or humiliating things. Its meaning has extended over time however, so that today a nostalgie de la boue is often used more loosely to refer to adesire to live a simpler, downsized, or less indulgent life—it literally means “a yearning for the mud.”

13. PLUS ÇA CHANGE

a world-weary acceptance of the current state of affairs—although things might appear to change or improve, beneath it all they remain just as bad as before.

14. POUR ENCOURAGER LES AUTRES

The ironic expression pour encourager les autres—meaning “so as to encourage the others”—refers to an action carried out to discourage any future unrest or rebellion.

15. RECULER POUR MIEUX SAUTER

If you reculer pour mieux sauter, then you literally “draw back in order to leap better.” a temporary withdrawal or pause in action that allows for time to regroup or reassess a situation, and therefore make a better attempt at it in the future.

16. REVENONS À NOS MOUTONS

“let us return to the matter at hand.”

17. ROI FAINÉANT

Literally a “do-nothing king.” leader who has no real power and instead acts merely as a figurehead, or as a symbol of power or authority.

18. TANT BIEN QUE MAL

Anything that is only partly or moderately successful. It literally means “as well as badly.”

19. VENTRE À TERRE

Ventre à terre literally means “belly to the ground” in French, and so taken literally it can be used simply to describe someone or something lying face down. Doing something ventre à terre, ultimately, means doing it at full speed.

20. VIOLON D’INGRES

hidden talent or pastime, far outside of what you are best known for, and in which you are just as knowledgeable or adept.

How to Learn a Language Naturally: Back to the Basics

        Lately as I’ve been gradually getting back into independent language learning I’ve found myself struggling with where to begin. Every textbook I would take out would leave me bored and frustrated with either the simplicity or the level it was placed at relative to where I was at that time; yet without some sort of direction, I felt lost. Already battling against lack of motivation, creating a self-study program from scratch seemed like an incredibly daunting task. However, after taking a step back I’ve begun to see other approaches that I can take to learn the language in a more natural way – turning away from standard study that leaves me unmotivated, and focusing instead on fun and entertaining ways of language application. Here is what I’ve come up with.


Starting off as a beginner:

        My greatest and first word of advice for starting off as a beginner in your target language would be to start looking around websites such as Memrise and Quizlet for lists of most commonly used words. The “Learn [Language] in 200/300 words” posts on Tumblr by @funwithlanguages are also a great place to start. Start working on pronouns, general sentence structure or basic phrases, and learning the overall conjugation patterns for the most basic verbs. Flashcards and index cards are incredibly useful here. This will give you a good foundation off of which you can build further.

        In addition, having some sort of structured course, such as the Teach Yourself series or many available courses on Memrise that teach vocabulary connected with dialogues, is extremely helpful. It has been scientifically proven that a person learns vocabulary much faster when they have some sort of emotional connection formed, and by learning words in context, it is much easier to remember what something means and how it is used.

Reading/Speaking:

Find some good, easy, dual-language books to start off with. Go through them chapter by chapter, making sure to read each paragraph in only the target language before going back and looking up/checking unknown words. Read each section multiple times as to ensure comprehension, and, even better, read it to yourself out loud while working on pronunciation. Later, as you become more advanced, you can move on to books entirely in your target language, and try to write your own definitions of unknown words using the given context before checking them yourself.

Search for different news sources from countries where your target language is spoken. Read through the article and write your own summaries of events.

Try changing the language settings on your phone or social media accounts to your target language, and make note of any new vocabulary – don’t allow yourself to go on autopilot.

Challenge yourself to make short vlogs or general videos in your target language. If needed, feel free to write a script to read off of; otherwise, challenge yourself to speak purely off the top of your head – using as much as you know, even if your sentences start off broken.

Set up Skype sessions with native speakers and practice communicating using whatever knowledge of your target language you possess. If you are unsure of a word, try to use others to describe it instead of resorting to your native language (or even just ask how you would say something using your target language).

Look up the lyrics to different songs in your target language and practice translating. Similarly, try translating other songs into your target language.

Writing:

Find native speakers who would be willing to communicate with and correct you, and practice conversing using only your target language (no matter how often you need to use a dictionary – but make sure you take note of any new vocabulary or concepts you come across!).

Practice writing status updates (whether on a private account or not), journal entries, essays, or fictional pieces in your target language. If able, see if you can find a native speaker who would be willing to give you corrections, or simply post your text on Lang8!

Listening:

Youtube is a great resource for all levels of language learning. Try searching for content creators that make videos in a genre you enjoy, and utilize their channels to practice your listening skills and inferring from context while immersing yourself. Write down any words you are unsure of to look up later.

Music in your target language – listen for words you recognize, and look up those you don’t. Things like lyrics are much more likely to stick in your memory, so use that to your advantage!

Look around for an online radio that broadcasts news in your target language, or even an online news source that posts or broadcasts video.

Watch films in your target language, even if it’s content that was originally in English. Many DVDs come with dubs in other languages depending on where you’re from, and Netflix (especially Netflix Original Series) also offers many different dub and subtitle options depending on the content. Even YouTube occasionally has films or TV episodes uploaded in other languages, so long as you look hard enough.

Grammar:

When it comes to grammar, it is important to have a good, solid grammar book that breaks down all basic ideas into something that is comprehensible. Don’t start off with learning grammar right away, however; give yourself some time to really soak up the language itself and get used to basic concepts first. Once you’re at a higher level, being able to properly break down your target language and put it back together will substantially help your progression to fluency.

Incorporate practice sentences into your writing, utilizing each concept. By forcing yourself to physically use each grammatical structure in a context you’ve come up with yourself, it will be much easier for you to master each idea, as well as help it to become more natural.

Hopefully this was helpful in some way! Good luck, and happy language learning!

anonymous asked:

What's the difference between passé composé and passé simple?

The passé simple tense in French is a kind of overarching ‘simple past’ tense, which could also be called the ‘preterite’ tense. The passé simple is pretty much exclusively used in writing, and even then quite formal writing. That’s why I don’t ever really make mention of it on my blog, because to be honest it’s a tense that’s out of fashion now. In my university lectures about French grammar (taught by highly educated French native speakers), I was told that ‘we’re going to teach you the passé simple for the exam then you can forget it and never use it again in everyday life.’ 

When talking about things that happened in the past, I will usually refer to three different tenses; the passé composé, the imparfait and the plus-que-parfait. If you’re wanting more detailed posts about any of these tenses then check out my French resources page on my blog, or send me an ask pestering me to make a new resource post :) 

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