polydorus

When Hector saw his brother Polydorus with his entrails in his hands and sinking down upon the ground, a mist came over his eyes, and he could not bear to keep longer at a distance; he therefore poised his spear and darted towards Achilles like a flame of fire. When Achilles saw him he bounded forward and vaunted saying, “This is he that has wounded my heart most deeply and has slain my beloved comrade. Not for long shall we two quail before one another on the highways of war.”
—  Iliad
Gold Saints : ideals of beauty

I’ve always had a headcanon that Gold Saints, in addition to being excellent warriors, were the most beautiful men amongst all the Saints. And if we add up this to beauty in ancient Greece, we can see that this could be effectively true.


General things

In the Classical Period, the ideal of beauty was very simple : it was gods. The masculine beauty was youthful and athletic. The respect of the proportions was essential (this included golden section). We can see this in the statues of the gods, or of Olympic athletes.

The Apollo of the Belvedere, a Roman marble copy of a bronze original made by the athenian sculptor Leochares

In the Hellenistic Period, the respect of the proportion was a little less important, the statues tended to have more muscles for example.The natural beauty is very important : the natural complexion must be good, not too fair as if the person stay indoor all the time, not too tanned as if the person stay too much outdoor. The complexion must show a « good health ».

The Laocoön and His Sons, made by the Rhodians sculptors Agesander, Athenodoros and Polydorus


Kalos kagathos : the ideal of beauty

« καλὸς κἀγαθός » (kalos kagathos) is an expression used in the ancient Greek litterature. It’s an shortened form of καλὸς καὶ ἀγαθός, which litteraly means « beautiful and good » (the Latin equivalent is mens sana in corpore sano). It refers to the ideal of harmony of the body and the mind. The Greek athlete is the model of this beauty.

We must point out that the adjective ἀγαθός (which means good) refers to the virtue of the person, to his bravery. It also has a political sense : to be good means to be a good citizen, and so to respect the duties of the citizen.

So to be beautiful, one must have an athletic body, culture and virtue. The Greek education took it into account : the sport was as much important as the mind, the education trained equally these two points. We can compare this to the training that receive Saints : it is very physical, but they also have a more theorical education. We can see this with Marin and Seiya (she teaches him about atoms and he falls asleep), also with Doko and Shiriyu.


Greek heroes

When speaking about the kalos kagathos, the biggest examples are the mythological Greek heroes (like Achilles, Adonis, Perseus). Most of them have some things in common :

  •  Athletic body (very tall, strong)
  • Long blond hair (like a lion’s mane)
  • Virtuous (kind, brave, sense of honor, …)
  • Good eloquence

Brad Pitt as Achilles in the movie « Troy »


Does this not remind you of some Saints ?

Effectively the Gold Saints could be based on mythological heroes. But for me none of them can really perfectly represent the real kalos kagathos. However the closest to pretend to this title is : Aiolos.

Aiolos is the archetype of the mythological hero :

  • He has an athletic body : he’s tall (1m87, 6'1’’), he’s built and he’s incredibly strong
  • He has blond hair (in the manga all the Gold Saints have blond hair, apart from Camus who is red-haired), although they are not very long.
  • He’s very virtuous : he still was chosen to be the next Pope
  • He has a relatively good eloquence (like most of the heroes of Saint Seiya imho)

Aiolos and Athena

Plus he did one of the most heroic things of all the series : he saved baby Athena and sacrificed his life for this. He’s in all case the representation of the kagathos.


If we speak more about the physical appearance I would say that Milo is the representation of the kalos.

A fanart of Milo, all credits to the artist

Furthermore the choose of the name « Milo » could refer to a famous wrestler of ancient Greece, Milo of Croton (he was said to have carried a bull on his shoulder). As I said above the athletes were the models of the Greek beauty.

Milo of Croton, by the sculptor Falconet

HECUBA IS A BITCH

HECUBA IS HAVING A REALLY SHIT DAY. SHE USED TO BE QUEEN OF TROY, BUT NOW HER CITY IS ON FIRE AND HER HUSBAND AND MOST OF HER KIDS ARE DEAD. ONE OF HER REMAINING CHILDREN, POLYXENA HAS BEEN SACRIFICED AT ACHILLES’ TOMB BECAUSE WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK, GREEKS, HUMAN SACRIFICE??!?

LUCKILY SHE’S SENT HER LAST SON, POLYDORUS, OFF TO SOME FRIENDLY KING TO BE SAFE AS FUCKING HOUSES. OF COURSE THE KID’S NOT SAFE, HE’S BEEN MURDERED TO DEATH TOO.

HECUBA FINDS HIS BODY DUMPED ON THE BEACH AND IS PRETTY FUCKING MAD ABOUT THIS. SHE GOES TO THE KING WHO IS SUPPOSED TO BE LOOKING AFTER HER SON AND HAS A SECRET MEETING WITH HIM.

HE PRETENDS HER SON IS STILL ALIVE TO STEAL GOLD FROM HER, BECAUSE DOESN’T EVERYONE JUST LOVE GETTING MONEY OUT OF VULNERABLE OLD LADIES? HECUBA IS SO DONE WITH HIS SHIT THAT SHE SETS HER GANG OF LADY FRIENDS ON HIM AND RIPS HIS FUCKING EYES OUT AND DRINKS HIS BLOOD FOR GOOD MEASURE.

SHE THEN TURNS INTO A DOG SINCE STATISTICALLY DOGS ARE MUCH HAPPIER THAN TROJAN WOMEN.

Greek Hemidrachm issued by the tyrant Alexander, Pherae, Thessaly, c. 369-358 BC

This coin shows the youthful head of Jason wearing a petasos. On the reverse is ALEXA - NDREION on either side of a horse’s hoof and lower leg to right. An extremely rare and fine coin, the very best of few known examples, as close to perfection as any Greek coin can be.

Pherae was an ancient Greek town in southeastern Thessaly. In history, Pherae is famous as the home of the fourth-century BC tyrants Jason and his son, Alexander of Pherae, who took control of much of Thessaly before their defeat by the Thebans.

The accounts of how Alexander of Pherae came to power vary somewhat in minor points. Diodorus Siculus tells us that upon the assassination of his father, the tyrant Jason of Pherae, in 370 BC, his brother Polydorus ruled for a year, but he was then poisoned by Alexander, another brother. However, according to Xenophon, Polydorus was murdered by his brother Polyphron, who was, in turn, murdered by his nephew Alexander, son of Jason, in 369 BC. Plutarch relates that Alexander worshiped the spear he slew his uncle with as if it were a god.

Alexander’s tyranny caused the intervention of a number of city-states in Thessalian affairs. The other Thessalian cities, refusing to recognize Alexander as head magistrate, appealed to the Thebans, who sent Pelopidas to their assistance. Alexander imprisoned Pelopidas, and the Thebans had to send a large army to procure his release. In 364 Pelopidas defeated Alexander at Cynoscephalae in Thessaly. Alexander was then compelled by Thebes to acknowledge the freedom of the Thessalian cities, to limit his rule to Pherae, and to join the Boeotian League. He was murdered at his wife’s instigation in 357-356 BC. She waited until he was sleeping and then let her brothers in his chambers to assassinate him. His body was then cast into the street and ridiculed.