pollock krasner foundation

Jackson Pollock’s Echo: Number 25, 1951 is back on view at MoMA as part of Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 after its recent visit to the Dallas Museum of Art. Find out what our conservation department learned from studying Echo


[Shown: Jackson Pollock. Echo: Number 25, 1951. 1951. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Installation view of Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 at The Museum of Modern Art, New York (November 22, 2015–March 13, 2016). Photograph: Yan Pan]

Jackson Pollock was born on this day in 1912. See how he developed his signature style in a current exhibition featuring over 50 works from MoMA’s collection. 


[Jackson Pollock. Number 1A, 1948. 1948. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

This week: See Pollock from a new perspective, hear a demo of a 1957 Fender Stratocaster from our collection, and more.  


[Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Manuel Molina Martagon]

Last day! Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey shows the evolution of his signature style through approximately 50 paintings, drawings, and prints. Pollock told one critic that his composition for Gothic, shown here, was based on Pablo Picasso’s 1907 masterpiece Les Demoiselles d'Avignon, which he would have seen at MoMA. Pollock’s black lines create an almost architectural scaffolding that recalls the cluster of figures and arching forms in Picasso’s brothel scene. 

[Installation view: Jackson Pollock. Gothic. 1944. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

How do you move a priceless work of art? Very carefully, of course. Hear a MoMA conservator and registrar explain the process to Leonard Lopate of WNYC Radio


[Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

Last chance! Jackson Pollock: A Collection Survey, 1934–1954 closes Sunday. This painting, titled Free Form, is very likely Pollock’s first “drip” painting. The exhibition explores how the artist’s signature style developed over several decades. 


[Jackson Pollock. Free Form. 1946. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

See how Jackson Pollock developed his signature style over the course of two decades in a current exhibition featuring approximately 50 works from MoMA’s collection.  

[Jackson Pollock. The Flame. c. 1934–38. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

Jackson Pollock. The Flame. c. 1934-38 | MoMA

Tonight the flame is lit in Rio! Celebrate with Jackson Pollock’s early painting The Flame from our collection. 

[Jackson Pollock. The Flame. c. 1934-38. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2016 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

(via Jackson Pollock. The Flame. c. 1934-38 | MoMA)

Find inspiration in 2016! Register for Winter/Spring classes on Pollock, Degas, and more. 


[Jackson Pollock. Untitled. c. 1950. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]

What’s it like to have a sleepover at MoMA? These MoMA Teens found out

[The House of Horrors crew poses in front of a Jackson Pollock. Photo: Calder Zwicky. Shown: Jackson Pollock. One: Number 31, 1950. 1950. Oil and enamel paint on canvas, 8′ 10″ x 17′ 5 5/8″ (269.5 x 530.8 cm). Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection Fund (by exchange). © 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York]