political race

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#BeingBlackandMuslim Portrait Series by Bobby Rogers

Visual artist and photographer Bobby Rogers’ latest portrait series #BeingBlackandMuslim taps on members of the Black Muslim community to share their harrowing experiences with, well, simply being who they are. 

The eyeopening series exposes stereotypes and stigmas plaguing the community; further proving we all have more work to do when it comes to bringing awareness to squash these century-old, derogatory ways of thinking. 

Instagram.com/WeTheUrban

Before the mythic American melting pot, there is the first generation.

This podcast explores the inner workings of the mythic American melting pot; what happens when your parents come from two different countries, cultures, or races. It’s the kindergarten-level foreign language you can speak to your aunts, the taste for “foreign” flavors you’ve known since childhood, and the distinct feeling of otherness projected onto your face because you look just a little bit “different.”

Starting May 1, this five-part miniseries will introduce you to stories of mixed race Americans who are grappling with questions about who they are, and what it means to be an American today.

Host Alex Laughlin will share her own stories and interview multiracial people about what it means to be mixed in America today.

Listen here! 

npr.org
Trump, The NFL And The Powder Keg History Of Race, Sports And Politics
President Trump says his calling for the firing of NFL players who don't stand for the national anthem isn't about race. But the protests are about racial justice, which has a long history in sports.

Sunday was a historic day for the intersection of sports and politics.

Widespread protests in the National Football League, the most popular professional sport in America, were shown on broadcast channels across the country.

Stick to sports? Not this week. Whether sports fans wanted to see it or not, they couldn’t avoid politics.

Athletes — mostly black — from every team in the country knelt, stood arm in arm, sat or refused to take the field for the national anthem. They even took it abroad with the first protest taking place in England, in a game that represents the NFL’s effort to broaden the league’s appeal.