polital

Sebastian Stan. I don’t know what else to say other than thank you for being a big part of my life, and my journey from having come out. Here’s the story…

Picture it. Austin Comic Con, a few hours ago.

I’m standing in line to get his autograph and he could tell that I was nervous. He said, “Hi, what’s your name?” “I’m Albert,” I replied. “Albert, it’s a pleasure to meet you,” he responded. “The pleasure is all mine, Sebastian,” I stated. I then went on to tell him how he affected my life. I said, “Sebastian, I wanted to tell you that I came out three years ago, and it was your performance as TJ in “Political Animals” that encouraged me to come out. I figured, if you can be comfortable playing a gay man, I can be comfortable in my own skin. Thank you for helping me accept who I am.” He grabbed my hand and rubbed it with his thumb as he said, “I appreciate your honesty. I am really touched to hear that and I am glad that I could help you be who you are.” I shed a couple of tears after I walked away from the table. He was just so sweet.

Fast forward an hour and a half later… I am now in line with three girls that were also fangirling over Sebastian and we were trying to decide our poses. They told me, “Cut the line. WE NEED TO SEE THIS HAPPEN!” I cut the line so  I could be cheered on. When I got to him he asked, “Hey there, what are we doing?” I said, “I want to do the “Gone with the Wind” pose.” “How does that one go again?” he asked. “Dip me and look into my eyes,” I replied. I was suddenly entranced into his beautiful, blue eyes. He had me in a spell that no one could release me from. Sebastian is such a beautiful man. I love you, Sebastian.

When will the media report that Justin Trudeau has been banned from the territory of a First Nation over failing to fairly negotiate treaty rights?

This seems like a big deal.

Some quotations:

“Chief Councillor Elmer Frank of Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation told Ha-Shilth-Sa he would be writing to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to say he was no longer welcome in the Tla-o-qui-aht ha-houlthee (chiefly lands) until his bureaucracy and government lawyers began reflecting the Prime Minister’s promise of reconciliation with the First Nations of this land.”

“Either the Prime Minister and his ministers are misleading the country, or the bureaucracy is not fulfilling that new direction , said Francis Frank, a lead negotiator for the T’aaq-wiihak Nations”

“The Department of Fisheries is still putting forward the Conservative agenda, following a model developed under former Prime Minister Stephen Harper and former Fisheries Minister Gail Shea, read a statement from the nations during a meeting today. This model includes “stalling and continued litigation.””

“Enough is enough,” he said.

“We expect Canada and DFO to reevaluate your approach and come back to this table when you are serious about reconciling our Aboriginal Rights in a meaningful and respectful manner,” Reid and her staff were told at the meeting.

Until that time “we are not willing to subject our Ha’wiih, elders, fishers and members any more to this farce you call ‘negotiations’.”

Something that’s really started annoying me lately is that Americans, mainly US citizens, seem to think that white people can’t be prejudice against other white people. That Europe apparently has no racism because it’s full of white people and I just ? One, black people, Asian people, latinx and people of colour in general exist EVERYWHERE, including Europe, but xenophobia anyone? For example, in the UK, we have a lot of xenophobia towards Polish and Eastern Europeans, especially Romanians and Ukrainians (which is absolutely absurd for a “kingdom” that was built on a long history of colonialism and slavery, but I digress) anyways, Poles and Eastern Europeans literally get called vermin. They are insulted for their accents. They are branded as “chavs” which happens to be a stereotype for the poor in the UK (we suffer from very severe classim here as well.) Yet when I tell people outside the UK (or Europe) about this, especially Americans, one of two things happens. 1) They have no idea what actually goes on in the UK or 2) They call me a liar and say that white people can’t be prejudice against other white people even when some white people are actually attacking and even killing other white people over their accents, and the fact they don’t “belong” in the country/countries. 

I guess what I’m trying to say is, don’t apply one country’s politics to every country’s politics. People have different relationships to immigration and race depending on what country you’re in. Don’t invalidate another person’s experience just because it doesn’t fit your rhetoric. 

4

The First National Black History Museum Is Here

There were plenty of powerful moments during Saturday’s dedication of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

But one stood out: The first black president and the first black first lady helping Ruth Bonner, the 99-year-old daughter of a man born a slave in Mississippi, ring a bell to open the first national museum of black history. Read more on that here.

You can also read President Barack Obama’s dedication to the museum here.

(All photos by Getty Images)

Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy is an ongoing example of a rich robber baron trying to annex the public government like a business acquisition for self-gain and executive profit: building the brand of Donald Trump. And he’s doing it with committed racial division. Conservatives have uncritically cried “racially-divisive-wolf” at President Obama for so long that they can no longer identify actual racial divisiveness.

Critics who treat ‘adult’ as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development.

When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.

—  C S Lewis
hashilthsa.com
DFO dismissed from negotiations by hereditary chiefs; Prime Minister no longer welcome in territory
Chief Councillor Elmer Frank of Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation told Ha-Shilth-Sa he would be writing to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to say he was no longer welcome in the Tla-o-qui-aht ha-houlthee (chiefly lands) until his bureaucracy and government lawyers began reflecting the Prime Minister’s promise of reconciliation with the First Nations of this land.

The hereditary chiefs of five Nuu-chah-nulth Nations stood this afternoon to tell Fisheries and Oceans Canada Regional Director General Rebecca Reid and her staff to leave Nuu-chah-nulth territories and not come back until they bring with them a mandate to negotiate in good faith on their Aboriginal commercial fishing rights.

See video: https://youtu.be/RIQRIBSHoQQ

Further, Chief Councillor Elmer Frank of Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation told Ha-Shilth-Sa he would be writing to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to say he was no longer welcome in the Tla-o-qui-aht ha-houlthee (chiefly lands) until his bureaucracy and government lawyers began reflecting the Prime Minister’s promise of reconciliation with the First Nations of this land.

Trudeau took part in Tla-o-qui-aht’s parade through Tofino this summer, which celebrated the good working relationship that local governments enjoy with the Nuu-chah-nulth peoples of the West Coast of Vancouver Island. At that time, the Prime Minister talked about the improved relationship his government is working to develop with Indigenous peoples.

Either the Prime Minister and his ministers are misleading the country, or the bureaucracy is not fulfilling that new direction , said Francis Frank, a lead negotiator for the T’aaq-wiihak Nations, the five nations that proved in Canada’s own court system their right to fish and sell fish.

Continue Reading.

thestar.com
Thunder Bay police face allegations of 'systemic' racism
Body of Stacey DeBungee found in a Thunder Bay river, prompts larger review of police actions

The Ontario police oversight body will hold a sweeping review of Thunder Bay Police’s conduct in the investigations in the deaths of indigenous people.

The Office of the Independent Police Review Director (OIPRD) will conduct their systemic review this fall. They will drill down on the deaths of Stacey DeBungee, 41, whose body was found in a Thunder Bay river on Oct. 19, 2015, and on “information and evidence” surrounding the deaths of seven students who attended a Thunder Bay high school from 2000 to 2011.

DeBungee’s body was found in the McIntyre River. Within three hours of the discovery, the Thunder Bay Police issued a statement that a body was found and that an “initial investigation does not indicate a suspicious death. A post mortem examination will be conducted to determine an exact cause of death.”

In a second press release on Oct. 20, 25 hours after the discovery, the police identified DeBungee and said DeBungee’s “death has been deemed as non-criminal.”

“There is a systemic treatment of indigenous deaths that is not lost on any of my clients,” said Julian Falconer, the DeBungee family lawyer who also acted for Nishnawbe Aski Nation at the inquest into the seven students’ deaths.

The police put both the releases out before a post mortem occurred, Falconer said.

“They are less than worthy victims. This is simply a more acute example, a very clear example, of what is sadly being experienced in the murdered and missing indigenous women and girls’ scenario. The quality of the investigations are in my decades of practice, well below the standard of anything I have ever seen,” Falconer said.

The OIPRD will investigate if “there is a pattern” by Thunder Bay Police to competently investigate aboriginal deaths, Falconer said. “There are too many cases of aboriginal deaths that simply go uninvestigated or incompetently investigated.”

Continue Reading.

ecowatch.com
Federal Bill Seeks First Native American Land Grab in 100 Years
House bill seeks to take 100,000 acres of Ute tribal lands and hand them over to oil and mining companies.
By EcoWatch

Even as the Dakota Access Pipeline protest in Standing Rock has galvanized Native Americans across the U.S., a bill introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives by Utah Republican Congressmen Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz seeks to take 100,000 acres of Ute tribal lands and hand them over to oil and mining companies. Will Bears Ears be the site of the next standoff?

vice.com
Is The Controversy Over Maryam Monsef’s Birthplace Just A Racist Witch Hunt?
Experts say a white minister born outside Canada likely wouldn't be facing the same scrutiny.

This week the Globe and Mail revealed that Canada’s Democratic Institutions Minister Maryam Monsef was actually born in Iran, not Afghanistan as she had previously stated.

Inquiries from the newspaper prompted Monsef to ask her mom about her roots, who informed Monsef that she was in fact born in Mashhad, Iran, about 370 kilometres northwest of where she thought she was born in Herat, Afghanistan. Monsef said the discovery was emotional and explained that even though she was born in Iran, she’s an Afghan citizen and did spend part of her early life in Herat. Her father was killed at the Afghan-Iran border in 1988, and her mom fled with Monsef and her two sisters to Canada in 1996, after Herat fell to the Taliban. Monsef was 11 when she immigrated here as a refugee.

For the most part, this sounds like a harrowing piece of someone’s personal history. And yet it’s become a major news story—one that’s put Monsef on the receiving end of incredulity and suspicion.

Ezra Levant of right-wing propaganda site The Rebel accused Monsef of lying so she could “rule over Afghans as some lady warlord” by pursuing a political career there.

Meanwhile Tory leadership candidate Tony Clement has suggested Monsef step aside pending “more of an investigation” of the mix-up and how the government failed to learn of Monsef’s true birthplace when she was being vetted.

“It’s a very strange story and there has to be more of an investigation,” he said, while others have speculated that there were rumours about Monsef being born in Iran so it’s unlikely she didn’t know about it.

“(It’s) a lot of fuss about nothing very serious,” Jennifer Hyndman, director of the Centre for Refugee Studies at York University told VICE.

“If you look culturally, we can see all the differences in terms of how important the notion of date of birth is, place of birth being sort of equally ephemeral,” she said, pointing out that a number of refugees who come to Canada list January 1 as their birth date because they don’t know what the real one is.

Continue Reading.