police evidence

Have you ever thought about how terrifying Molly Hooper actually is?

The girl’s got an encyclopedic knowledge of human anatomy and pathology that makes Sherlock jealous, regularly processes murder victims as part of her routine job, is closely acquainted with police investigative procedure and when she helped Sherlock fake his death she played her part so convincingly that Scotland Yard was completely fooled.

If she wanted, she could easily be the deadliest character on this show. Your ass is just lucky she prefers kittens and fluffy sweaters to recreational murder.

What a lot of people don’t understand is that the prison industrial complex goes far beyond just the fact that prisons exists.

It’s every single major corporation in the world benefitting from paying slave wages for prison labor

It’s private prisons enforcing quotas to incentivize the state to arrest and convict at higher rates

It’s the war on drugs treating (mostly black and latino) non-violent drug users as hardened criminals

It’s the school to prison pipeline

It’s a country where homelessness is criminalized

It’s mandatory minimum prison sentences

It’s imprisoning civilians for years without bail Before they get a trial

It’s prisoners leaving prison in debt because the slave wages they were forced to work for didn’t cover the cost of food and a bed

It’s former prisoners losing the right to vote

It’s employers discriminating against former prisoners

It’s abuse and substandard living conditions.

It’s a corrupt police state that falsifies evidence and unfairly targets minorities.

The problem is that a lot of y'all still just think of prison as a place where bad people go. It’s not. Most of the bad people are in board rooms, on the golf course, at the bank, in the white house. The truth is, prisons in America are just a business. The lie that they keep you safe is just an ad they can run.

Abolish the prison industrial complex

More utterly soppy post-Seine Valvert domesticity.

[Click through for full-size, non-blurry pic.]

(Valjean, I apologise unreservedly for inadvertently depicting you with a rather bruised arm there. That’s what happens when a dozy artist suddenly changes a background colour without paying sufficient attention to the results. Let’s just pretend you’ve been enjoying an invigorating session of Extreme Gardening and wrestling with a rosebush a few hours prior.)

theguardian.com
FA under pressure to explain £80,000 payment to Eni Aluko after bullying complaint
The FA is facing questions over why it paid ‘hush money’ to Eni Aluko but denies that she is unable to speak out
By Daniel Taylor

The Football Association is facing questions over why it paid “hush money” to international footballer Eni Aluko after it emerged that a bullying complaint against the England manager, Mark Sampson, included an allegation that he made a remark with “racial and prejudicial connotations” to another player.

Aluko, one of England’s most recognisable female footballers with 102 caps, was paid around £80,000 to sign an agreement that the FA claims was to “avoid disruption” ahead of this summer’s Euro 2017. Aluko’s lawyers believe that the agreement she signed prevents her from speaking about it but the FA insists she is now free to talk about the facts of the case.

The Guardian can reveal that her complaint contained an allegation that Sampson made a “highly inappropriate” remark with whereby he asked a mixed race player how many times she had been in trouble with the police.

“During a meeting with the midfielders’ unit of players, of which I was not present, MS [Sampson] used an analogy about pressing hard in midfield and getting a caution like a police caution,” Aluko’s evidence states. “MS then addressed the player individually and said in relation to being cautioned by police: ‘Haven’t you been arrested before? Four times isn’t it?’”

As well as the £80,000 payment, the governing body also awarded Aluko a new one-year central contract, worth £20,000, despite her making it clear she would never appear for England again “under his [Sampson’s] management”.

Aluko has not played for England since April and her eight-page complaint, emailed to the FA’s technical director, Dan Ashworth, and head of performance, Dave Reddin, as part of an exercise to gather information about the culture within England’s squads, alleges a “culture of bullying and harassment” in the women’s setup.

Aluko’s evidence continues: “This comment about the player was made with derogatory, racial and prejudicial connotations. It was also a defamatory, untrue statement given that the player has never been arrested and MS’s comment indicates an assumption (subconscious or conscious) that being mixed race from London suggests a criminal record with the police.

Did Necrozma make the Z-Crystals?

Ever since this morning when the trailers hit I was wondering about the new forms that Lunala and Solgaleo had and how they appear to be taken over or augmented by the Prism Pokemon Necrozma and I wondered just how it would tie in with an “alternate” story line.  Now here’s where things get a little bit ludicrous and a lot of bologna is being produced.

Part I - Z-Crystals

There is no actual explanation as to where the Z-Crystals come from, just that they harness the power of trainer and pokemon combined to unleash a powerful attack, not how they are made or what gives them this ability.

Yes we see the Tapu’s deliver Z-Rings to the player, we never know where they get the stones from.

Part II - Necorzma

In Pokemon Sun & Moon, the lore tries to put Necrozma in the same category as the Ultra Beasts, though the International Police has no evidence of this. The lore further states that it reflects any light that it comes in contact with it.

A thing that was interesting to me while researching Necrozma was the symbol on his back that lightly resembles a Z Crystal

Part III - It All Comes Together

Looking at the footage released this in this mornings Pokemon Direct, we see Lunala and Solgaleo with new “Necrozma” like armor

Now here’s where it gets crazy, what if Necrozma has a habit of taking over other legendary or strong Pokemon, wanting to reflect their “light” or “energy” as a prism wants to refract the colors of the prism scale.

And what if when Necrozma does this, the energy of the Pokemon’s type leaks out when it is being reflected an either a) comes into contact with earth or rocks, destroying them as a whole and leaving the Z-Crystals as shards left over b) the light simply superimposes itself on rocks and humans have chipped at the larger stones to get the crystals.

And when this process is done and all of the Pokemon’s energy is spent or “The Light Fades”, Necrozma moves on, wanting to find another host.

Or as Lunala and Solgaleo are meant to be the Deity of Alola, their light could be all encompassing in terms of what type it is and when put through the prism creates Z-Crystals of all types?

Let me know what you think, is it plausible, is it insane, is whirl a complete lunatic grasping at straw? Maybe it’s all of the above, most likely so. Regardless I am ecstatic for news of a new game!

Reblog or ask me things if you like the theory!

anonymous asked:

can you please explain what does the new tmz article mean? is it what we already knew or is it new information? :/

This is exactly what happens in a case, just as I said. Nothing is new in there except TMZ wanting a headline (and it’s effective based on my inbox, because everyone is losing their effing minds). The prosecutor will decide whether to charge him. That’s not up to the police, it was never up to the police. The police gather the evidence and make the arrest and present it to the prosecutor. OF COURSE the police will give the evidence to the prosecutor even after seeing a video (which video? when? who? we have no idea - please read the article critically; 99% of the time THEY HAVE NO DETAILED SOURCE OF INFORMATION). If they didn’t, then they’d be admitting to wrongful arrest. The prosecutor decides whether they want to spend their resources pursuing a case where the video like that would be presented to a jury. Police don’t have to think about that; all they care about is justifying their arrest.

Also, Louis has a very high-powered effective attorney. Us worrying about this (or trying to do anything to help – please stop that, it’s interfering and unnecessary and childish) and getting hysterical every time there’s an article we don’t like helps no one. Reacting dramatically to articles about normal court procedures is the exact thing anyone who is trying to smear Louis’ name would want.

I am absolutely disgusted with the media blackout. Everything about how “violent” people are for burning cars, not a word about the many near fatal and brutal injuries protesters have suffered. Most of whom were innocent but even if not, someone who sets fire to a trashcan has the right not to have their bones broken during an arrest.

So much video footage of police brutally attacking people who aren’t violent or even resisting, but protesters throwing rocks from a roof onto a fucking military vehicle, or throwing bottles at cops who wear helmets, now that’s apparently outrageous excessive violence!

Journalists are supposed to hold people in power to account, not being the amplifier of the evidently lying police scum.

You can really tell the media is owned by rich fucks.

theguardian.com
Chechen police 'have rounded up more than 100 suspected gay men'
Russian newspaper says it has evidence that at least three men have been killed in ‘prophylactic sweep’ in Chechnya

A respected Russian newspaper claims it has uncovered evidence that police in the southern Russian republic of Chechnya have rounded up more than 100 men suspected of homosexuality and that at least three have been killed. The report in the investigative newspaper Novaya Gazeta said it had confirmed the information with sources in the Chechen police and government, but gave no further details. “In Chechnya, the command was given for a ‘prophylactic sweep’ and it went as far as real murders,” Novaya Gazeta reported. The report was denied by the spokesman of the Chechen president, Ramzan Kadyrov, who suggested there were no gay people in the Muslim-majority region.

anonymous asked:

I'm concerned as to whether or not violence actually affects anything positive. I get that it's supposed to scare them into shutting up, but it doesn't seem to be having that effect. It seems to be helping their victimhood act. I get that people should know better than to fall for that act, but the fact is that they apparently don't, so we need to take that into account strategically. It would obviously be to their benefit to pay fake rioters to do violence. Should we then do that for free?

This is a hotly-debated question among anti-fascists and anti-racists.  Here’s the way we believe this question should be approached: if you discovered that there was a gang of fascists was in your community recruiting members and publicly organizing, what could you do about it?  Here are the range of options:

1) Ignore them and hope they just magically go away.

The problem with this, of course, is that it does not work.  History has very clearly shown us that ignoring violent racist extremists doesn’t make them go away; on the contrary, it gives them license to intimidate, attack, and eventually murder the people belonging to groups they’ve targeted - racialized people, LGBTQ people, people with disabilities, religious minorities, etc.  This is because fascists take your total disregard of their presence as a sign that you agree with them.  It also lets the people they target know that no one will defend or support them.  As novelist Joy Kogawa put it, “if there’s just one thing that history teaches us, just one thing, it’s that bystanders and perpetrators are both on the same side.“ 

2) Report them to the authorities.
  
People that believe this is the way to address fascists in their communities are often extremely disappointed with the result.  The authorities aren’t going to do anything to stop fascist plans until they have injured or killed somebody.  To our mind, that is far, far too late.

There are other problems with relying on the authorities to solve fascism and racism as well.  The old saying “cops and the Klan go hand-in-hand” doesn’t just come from police going out of their way to protect fascists and racists while viciously attacking those brave enough to confront fascists.

It also comes from decades of evidence of police involvement as members of fascist and racist groups themselves.   Some notorious examples of this include:

- the police in Greensboro, North Carolina colluding with the KKK to allow them to shoot up an anti-racist demonstration, killing five people;

- this asshole:

- this police department/KKK Klavern in Florida;

Then there are things like the time when the Canadian spy agency funneled money and intelligence to one of the main organizers of the neo-nazi Heritage Front, allowing it to grow into the largest white supremacist group in the country.  Or the time when Germany’s intelligence agency, which had been paying money to neo-nazi organizers, became aware of a neo-nazi gang’s serial murder plot and instead of stepping in, actively obstructed and tampered with the police investigation.  The neo-nazi gang would go on to murder nine immigrants and one police officer along with committing two bombings and fifteen bank robberies.  

Finally, there is the fact that in most cities, racialized people are more likely to be killed by police than by any other group of people.  So no, 2) is not a great option.

Which brings us to:

3) Take up some form of passive protest against them.

The favorite choice of liberals everywhere!  But the problem with pacifism is that it only works when the opposing side has a conscience.  Fascists not only lack that, but they actively fetishize and valorize violence as a legitimate political mechanism, a preferred political tactic, and a philosophical principle that builds group cohesion and commitment.  So bravo to liberals for deciding to do something about fascism but they quickly discover that they have to then choose whether or not they wish to be the victims of fascism, because opposing fascists necessitates self-defence.  Liberals that don’t understand this wind up making the same mistakes of people like the White Rose Society.    

So what’s left, then?

4)
Expose, oppose, and confront them whenever they appear and defend yourself and your community as necessary.
 
This is the tactic the majority of antifa choose.  It’s also the one that has, to our mind, the most effective over the last seventy years or so.  There’s abundant evidence of that to be found in examples like The 43 GroupAnti-Fascist Action, The Torch Antifa Network, The Anti-Fascist Network, and dozens more.  

Finally:

5) Hunting down and killing fascists.  

Which, to our knowledge, is very illegal in most places.

So Anon, which do you think is the right option to choose when fascists are publicly organizing and recruiting in your town?



  • <p> <b><p></b> <b>Alice Cooper:</b> why did you steal those files Hal?<p/><b>Hal Cooper:</b> I was afraid it would get traced back to Polly.<p/><b>Alice Cooper:</b> Okay, except she didn’t do anything and the only people who really thought she did was the Blossom’s and everyone knows they’re crazy.<p/><b>Hal Cooper:</b> Yeah, but it’s still-<p/><b>Alice Cooper:</b> But now you literally stole police evidence and hid it away for weeks, because you thought it would lead back to her which just seems incriminating in itself.<p/><b>Hal Cooper:</b> I mean I suppose it was-<p/><b>Alice Cooper:</b> Also why didn’t you just tell her that they were related when they started dating, they would have stopped if you had.<p/><b>Hal Cooper:</b> I just thought-<p/><b>Alice Cooper:</b> I should have thrown that brick at your head.<p/></p><p/></p>

Manchester police stop sharing information on attack with U.S. following leaks

  • Inability to keep sensitive information under wraps has prompted U.K. police to stop sharing evidence from its investigation into the Manchester bombing with the United States, according to the Guardian.
  • The decision follows the New York Times’ publication of forensic photos on Wednesday, reportedly enraging British authorities. The images showed shrapnel, shreds of a backpack and a mangled battery.
  • A national counterterrorism spokesperson told the Guardian that the U.K. “greatly value[s]” its international intelligence relationships, and “when that trust is breached it undermines these relationships, and undermines our investigations and the confidence of victims, witnesses and their families.” Read more (5/25/17)

Trump launches search to find intelligence leakers

  • Trump on Thursday announced a Justice Department inquiry to find the people leaking sensitive and classified information to the press.
  • “The leaks of sensitive information pose a grave threat to our national security,” Trump said in a statement. 
  • “I am asking the Department of Justice and other relevant agencies to launch a complete review of this matter, and if appropriate, the culprit should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.” Read more (5/25/17 12 PM)
8

Quick Review of the True Crime Books I read in 2016 (Part 2)

(Part 1) (Review of books in 2015)

Invisible Darkness by Stephen Williams: This is one of the most unsettling books I’ve read, and I have a lot of mixed feelings about it. Starting with the good, it’s a very complete and detailed account of the relationship between Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka and their crimes. It also offers a good insight into the very controversial legal agreement between Karla and the prosecution, that ended with her serving only ten years despite being an active and willing participant in the rape and murder of three girls. The third act of the book, dealing with this, was one of the better things in the novel, although I wish the actual trial had been covered more in depth. As for the bad… I thought the rape scenes were excessively and unnecesarily detailed, and I felt like the author enjoyed writing those disturbing passages a little too much. His narration is also very uneven, especially in the first part; while I liked his subtle sarcasm while describing the legal proceedings and Karla’s life, he also made some strange time jumps that made it a bit confusing to know when things are happening. There are so many private scenes that he couldn’t have possibly witnessed that he must have made them up, which made me question a little the credibility of the whole book. Finally, his obsession with Karla turns her into a fleshed out, complex character, but the opposite happens with Bernardo, who seems almost a caricature with no real insight. I still feel like I don’t know much about him other than he’s a narcissistic, sociopathic idiot. Bottomline: A good introduction to this case, if you have the stomach for it, but you’ll probably need to complement with other books later (Thank you @adeadlyinnocence for recommending me this book).

Conviction by Juan Martinez: Last year I read Picture Perfect, which is the better book to learn about Jodi Arias and Travis Alexander and how their story ended with her murdering him. This book was an interesting complement because I enjoy the details of trials and this one in particular was a very intense and eventful one. Juan Martinez, the man who prosecuted Arias, describes in detail his investigation and strategy to get a conviction, and he certainly doesn’t pretend to be humble when detailing his role in putting her behind bars. There’s no new information or revelations that I hadn’t seen everywhere else. He’s also extremely biased and portrays her as the worst of the worst, he even talks of her “dark soul” at some point. I have to say, I personally didn’t mind that because I can’t stand Jodi Arias, but if you’re looking for a more objective look into her, you should stay away from this.

True Crime Addict by James Renner: I already wrote about how bad this book about the disappearance of Maura Murray is here, but to summarize: don’t waste your time with this narcissistic, self infolved piece of sleazy reporting disguised as “journalism”. The author is insufferable and seems to think we care about his life while offering nothing new to the actual case of Maura.

Bringing Adam Home by Les Standiford: I can only describe this book as “correct” but is not really very engaging nor memorable, despite covering a very famous and horrible case. The kidnapping and murder of Adam Walsh in 1981 and the many years it took to be solved was one that shook the United States and started many changes. I feel like this book doesn’t quite manage to portray those changes, mostly because it decides to look away from Adam’s parents and their struggle and instead it focus on the story of the detective that eventually gave sufficient evidence for police to close the case naming Ottis Toole as the killer. Toole’s story is also described in some chapters but again, it seems to only give a superficial portrayal of him.

Imperfect Justice by Jeff Ashton: This book was written by one of the prosecutors in the Casey Anthony trial, so it’s important to keep in mind we are seeing only one side of the story, and he certainly doesn’t hold back in showing her as the most manipulative and lying person on Earth. That being said, it’s really hard to see how this woman was found not guilty. Ashton explains all the evidence they had in detail and it’s very compelling, and tells about all the things going on behind the scenes. He also can’t hide his contempt for the defense lawyer (he openly admits he dislikes him) and for the jury too, whom he clearly blames for the ultimate decision of the trial. My only issue with this book is that I didn’t see much introspection or real analysis into why they lost the case.

Perfect Murder, Perfect Town by Lawrence Schiller: It’s so hard to find an unbiased analysis of JonBenet Ramsey’s murder, because so many people who’ve written about it have been “part of the investigation”, which makes it a big no no for me because we know that investigation was far from stellar, for many reasons that aren’t just the fault of the police. This book is hardly perfect (see what I did there?) but it’s a decent start to the case, because it details the investigation and the many inside shenanigans, the Ramsey’s version, the complicated dealings with the prosecution’s office and why they refused to charge the Ramsey’s, and also how the press covered the case. It doesn’t really give much perspective on other potential suspects and the title is misleading, since it suggests it will explore more the context of Boulder, the town where the murder happened, but I didn’t see much of that. I’d say this is an okay book to understand why this case went so wrong, but I don’t think it gives one convincing theory about what really happened.

Devil in the Darkness by JT Hunter: Israel Keyes is one of the most chilling and intriguing serial killers in recent times, not to mention there’s still a lot of mystery around him, so it’s a bit surprising he hasn’t been more deeply covered by other authors. This book is a decent attempt at it, and gives a good introduction into what kind of person he was before he started his crimes; not so much after. Because there are a lot of unconfirmed things in his story, including his victims, the book mostly dedicates time to his most infamous murder, the one of Samantha Koenig. The narration jumps back and forth between the time around that crime and Keyes’ past, with a lot of attention put into his relationship with the mother of his daughter, probably because she seemed to be one of the few people involved willing to talk to the author. I found this book a bit hard to follow at times, but I’d still recommend it if you’re interested in true crime.

The Cases that Haunt Us by John Douglas and Mark Olshaker: As you probably know, John Douglas is the guy that pretty much built the department of behavior analysis in the FBI and is one of the pioneers in profiling criminals. He makes sure to tell you that a hundred times in this book, because he can never flatter himself enough, although I get that the talk of his past experiences is important here to validate his opinions. This book covers famous unsolved or solved but controversial cases through America’s history (plus Jack the Ripper because who can resist) and in each one Douglas gives his point of view of the profile of the suspects, and whether or not they fit with the actual murderer. Lizzie Borden, the kidnapping of the Lindberg Baby, the Boston Strangler and the Black Dahlia are among the cases covered. I found his views in the JonBenet’s case particularly interesting because he got to be involved personally in it, and he got a lot of criticisim because he thought the Ramseys were innocent (and I have to say, strictly from a profiling point of view, I agree with his assessment). The book can get exhausting because the writing is very academical and not very fluid, but it’s also a good learning experience if you like investigations.

It is important to know the political and physical geography of today’s events.


First, there were five distinct groups.
The Trump supporters were based in Terry Schrunk Plaza. They tended to wear flags, fatigues and red Trump hats. A handful of minorities were present.


Surrounding them were four different groups.
A peace group began their protests outside Portland City Hall. The diversity in this crowd ranged from different ethnicities, to clothing, to age (young children and their parents, teenagers, millennial, boomers, and a group of 80+ year olds who have been part of Portland protests for decades.) By 11:30, when I arrived, City Hall walkway and the sidewalk in front were packed, making it difficult to walk along the sidewalk. The crowd shortly was filling one of the lanes of traffic along 4th avenue. A number of religious and ethnic community leaders gave speeches. Chanting and loudspeakers were directed towards the small group of Trump supporters who came to the west end of the park with signs and flags. This was, by far, the largest of the anti-Trump groups.


On the east side of Schrunk Plaza a group made up of Union members and an older crowd with a megaphone taunted the Trump supporters closer to the stage in the plaza. The chanting was robust from both sides.


And in Chapman Park there were two groups, though at times difficult to distinguish between them. The color of the day was black. Some were covered head to toe. Others wore t-shirts with slogans attacking both the Trump administration and the Portland police. There were a number in the park who were there to protest the Trump rally and call for peace. And then there were those itching for a fight: Angry at Trump, his supporters, the media, and the Portland Police. Perhaps especially the Portland Police.


The largest area with direct contact between the opposing protestors was between SW 4th and SW. 3rd on Madison. That is where the largest conflict occurred. It made sense this was the area that police heavily patrolled. A concentrated line of police in riot gear spaced just a few feet apart, three to five feet off the sidewalk. At times one lane of the street included patrol cars or vans with running boards and handles on the outside that acted as transport for twelve or more police. One lane was always open to cars on SW 4th, 3rd, and Madison. That made it easy for police and security teams from at least three of the groups to ask, (Yes, “Ask”, This is Portland) people to stay out of the street. Those in Chapman Square, Schrunk Plaza, and along Madison Street had either a barrier of police in riot gear or yellow police incident tape to show them where the demarcation lines were.


Perhaps the most obvious part about the Portland police presence was whom they were watching. The anti-Trump demonstrators outnumbered the Trump rally by estimates of 20:1. And the police approach was clearly that Trump supporters were considered in danger. Police stood facing Chapman sometimes shoulder to shoulder. To the east and west of Shrunk Plaza they were not as concentrated, 8-10 officers with one or two facing the Trump supporters. The rest focused on the peace group at City Hall or the union chanters at the Federal building.
That focus was commented on constantly. Along with those comments was a memory of the action several weeks ago when buses were ready to transport Trump marchers back to the starting point when they marched through a multi-ethnic neighborhood chanting anti-immigrant slogans. No riot police presence was evident then, so police are seen as protecting Trump supporters while aggressively agitating those against the Trump administration.


About 30 minutes before the scheduled end of the Trump rally things began to change significantly.


I stood at the Northwest corner of SW 4th and Madison starting around noon. I could see straight down the line of the police facing Chapman Square. I could also see the peace groups gathered at City Hall and the small contingent of Trump supporters in constant shouting. I could see into Chapman Square itself only a few feet. Lots of black clad people concentrated in the SW corner of the square, making it hard to see much in the center.


It was a busy corner.


For a time, there was almost a joyous atmosphere to the crowd. But it was not without its tension.


At one point, as I was talking to a friend, a group of Trump supporters carrying various flags and paraphernalia came through the crowd outside City Hall. They made it a point to shoulder their way pushing people. When they got across the street, one of them had his red hat knocked off of his head. It fell to the ground and a heavyset black clad fellow in his 20’s grabbed the hat and started to walk away with it. My friend intervened and told him, “We don’t do that,” effectively de-escalating the incident and sending the anti-Trump guy across the street to Chapman Square and the Trump supporter on his way north on 4th.


A white truck circled the blocks several times. It seemed to want someone to get agitated as it constantly sped up to trap people in crosswalks.


A number of individual incidents took place with police isolating people for a time and searching bags, taking away poles, and then releasing them.


Then the scene got intense around 3:20.


Scores more police arrived with insignia from several agencies. A loudspeaker announced the “Because of Criminal activity, people need to move to the center of Chapman Square.” Something had happened. We could not see what that was from the corner next to the Portland Building.
Standing where I was, NOT in Chapman Square, across the street, I figured I’d be able to watch the situation. But that was not to be.


As I stood there, I was suddenly pushed by a Police officer with a baton telling me that I had to move. I said, “the announcement said people in the Square. I am not in the Square. And I am observing as an elected official.” (I had my little magnetic nametag on my right side of my shirt.)


His response was to say, “Hello Lew. We’ve met. But you still need to leave this area.”


So I started walking north along 4th watching the Square.


It became clear that more was going on there. Within a few minutes several large reports rang out. Smoke of some form was evident. Angry voices rang out across the park. I could see batons being swung. I could not see whether people or objects were being hit. I called to one of the activists I saw in the center of the square to come my direction. He was helping a woman who was clearly disoriented and upset. They came under the chain that surrounds the park and into the sidewalk and street, yelling at the police for what was likely tear gas or pepper spray of come kind.


What sounded like a series of pellets being fired could be heard.


The next announcement said that police had been assaulted and that the gathering had been declared illegal.


Eventually the line of police stopped a few feet in from Main Street while still in Chapman Square.


By that time I’d seen a number of water bottles and rocks thrown at the police. I did not see who threw them. But they landed near the front of the police line.


A new announcement said Lonsdale Square had also seen criminal activity and that it too must be cleared.


I started walking that way. At one point a group of folks threw several newspaper vending machines into the center of the street. Then came several orange cones.


Remembering the fire that was started at the May Day march, I walked directly over to the growing pile and stood there for a while. A masked friend from the crowd yelled at me to watch out because tear gas weapons were pointed at me in the center of the street. I decided to stand there a while to see if anything more would take place. Nothing did.


I left to go closer to the stand off line.


There a few individuals were yelling at police. One attempted to get others to join him at the front of the line. It was only marginally successful.


But something had changed.


The large group of black clad people gathered to march north along 4th.


The police line dispersed and moved back to the Madison Street location.


I looked down 4th to see the group chanting and heading towards Morrison, possibly Burnside, with Police in pursuit.


(Note that because 4th and 3rd avenues had been blocked, the peace groups at City Hall and the Federal building were separated from the smaller groups in Chapman Square. I wonder how they would have handled the pushing and shoving. Some folks had simply sat down in Chapman Square, only to be moved forcibly with batons.)


By this time the Trump rally was officially over.


It was clear from looking across the street that those in Schrunk Plaza were agitated and looking to the police for directions out of there. Those directions had a small number walking out the SE exit and up Jefferson Street.


I walked up to City Hall. (Hearing along the way from ACLU legal observers that flash and tear gas canisters had been used around 4th and Morrison and that the group had been surrounded and everyone arrested.)


At City Hall the numbers had diminished somewhat, but the enthusiasm had not. Chants were still going.


I do not believe the group at City Hall knew that the Trump rally had ended until police started letting a larger number of folks out of the Plaza on the west side.


Anti-Trump demonstrators formed a gauntlet for them to go through for a time on the corner of Jefferson and 4th. There were a few punches thrown before police broke up that gauntlet. Only to see another one form half a block down. And then still another skirmish in the next block. That seemed to be the case along a path that went several blocks south and then doubled back on 5th avenue to the Portland building.


By the time I got to Madison again, a pepper spray incident had taken place involving the police. Demonstrators were treating several people, including a photographer.


As I left down town I unsuccessfully tried to find the larger group that had moved north. Helicopters were circling. I did not find them. But I saw both brief skirmishes and measured conversations taking place throughout the downtown.


Take a ways:
If the message was that Portlanders reject the Trump agenda, that came through loud and clear.
Were the Black clad folks heading into the streets to create more problems? Possibly.
Did Portland police give clear directions? No.
Was the strategy simply to move the more volatile elements away from each other before the end of the Trump rally? Well, that worked.
I’ve been told that at least one brick was thrown at police prior to the closing of Chapman Square. That would likely be grounds for some action. Was it over reaction?
Did the isolation approach work for the five rally groups? The peaceful groups continued to make their views clear. At what cost to future demonstrations? I know one former state senator who lost a great deal of respect for the Portland police after being manhandled and tear gassed while standing in what she had been told was a safe place to be.
I have not seen the media coverage beyond one article that spent ¾ of the time talking with and about the Trump supporters. I get it. The huge numbers of people protesting them were there because of them. And I think it was also likely that the reporter had not met or talked with that group before. I’d also say that the reporter decided to lump all of the protestors in one easy meme rather than understand the differences and how that played out on the streets and parks downtown. And of course the adrenaline spikes when there is action. Understanding the deeper issues or differences takes time for broadcast news and greater history and awareness for print. These days’ reporters are given neither time nor support for providing context.


Finally. It, frankly, could have been a lot worse.

—  Lew Frederick, Oregon State Senator (via Facebook)

Alright so i know this is a mainly anti ddlg blog but this is also an anti map, pedo, terf, etc. blog. There’s a youtuber called Justin Payne who goes out and poses as very young children in order to catch pedophiles in the act. Although he has taken the evidence to police, they do nothing about these predators. His channel exposes these people’s faces, names, and locations making sure people are aware of predators in their area, please spread the word of this channel to keep kids safe.

2

Can You Identify This Man?

Police investigators in the town of Delphi, Indiana, are pleading for any information or identification on the man pictured in the bottom photograph. He is believed to be a suspect or potential witness in the murders of two local girls, Abby Williams (13), and Liberty (Libby) German (14).

The two girls were reported missing on February 13, 2017, after taking a hike in a popular beauty spot. The last time the girls were seen was on the Monon High Bridge, where Abby took a photograph of Liberty and uploaded it to social media. The next day, their bodies were discovered close to a near-by river, about a quarter-mile away from the bridge. Police have since informed the media that DNA evidence has been recovered from the scene, though they are refusing to comment on the nature of the evidence.

Police have also obtained the above picture of the unknown suspect, and are asking for help in identifying the man. If you were in or around the Delphi region between February 13-14, you might have seen him. Here are some identifying features:

- Blue jeans
- Blue windbreaker jacket, with a possible scarf
- Brown cap
- Stockily built
- May have been hitchhiking on the day the girls disappeared
- Might be a keen outdoorsman/ have intimate knowledge of the area

Please, if you can help in any way, call the Delphi tip line at 844-459-5786. Your tip will be handled anonymously. Please help bring the killer(s) of Abby and Liberty to justice!

  • The Black Fairy: The police did find evidence of what happened to Belle. I just wanted to save you and Gideon the heartbreak. Look at these pictures.
  • Gold: She took up graphic design?
  • The Black Fairy: What? No, she's traveling the world. Here she is in front of the Eiffel Tower.
  • Gold: These are all clearly terrible Photoshop jobs. Did she make these? Her teacher must be awful.
  • The Black Fairy: No! These are all real! Look how much fun she's having without you.
  • Gold: Has she been doing this for the entire time she's been away? Because these wouldn't fool anybody.
  • The Black Fairy: Apparently not.