poisonous-flowers

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Jamaican Plant :: Oleander (Nerium oleander) 

This evergreen shrub can reach heights of up to 20’ but are most often pruned to a smaller size. Oleanders are extremely tolerant of a broad range of soil types, from heavy clay to well-drained sand. They are very drought tolerant and many survive without benefit of supplemental irrigation. Oleanders flower on new growth, so promoting lateral branching in spring can increase bloom count, these flowers occur in clusters.  A naturally occurring toxin in oleanders (Cardenolide Glycosides), when ingested in certain quantities, can be harmful/fatal to humans and pets, simply put Oleanders are poisonous. Since this toxin occurs primarily in the sap, be sure to wash hands thoroughly after pruning or handling plant parts. Fumes from burning oleanders can also be toxic.

A GUIDE FOR YOUNG LADIES ENTERING THE SERVICE OF THE FAIRIES, by Rosamund Hodge


I.

This is the lie they will use to break you: no one else has ever loved this way before.


II.

Choose wisely which court you serve. Light or Dark, Summer or Winter, Seelie or Unseelie: they have many names, but the pith of the choice is this: a poisoned flower or a knife in the dark?

(The difference is less and more than you might think.)

Of course, this is only if you go to them for the granting of a wish: to save your father, sister, lover, dearest friend. If you go to get someone back from them, or—most foolish of all—because you fell in love with one of them, you will have no choice at all. You must go to the ones that chose you.


III.

Be kind to the creature that guards your door. Do not mock its broken, bleeding face.

It will never help you in return. But I assure you, someday you will be glad to know that you were kind to something once.


IV.

Do not be surprised how many other mortal girls are there within the halls. The world is full of wishing and of wanting, and the fairies love to play with human hearts.

You will meet all kinds: the terrified ones, who used all their courage just getting there. The hopeful ones, who think that love or cleverness is enough to get them home. The angry ones, who see only one way out. The cold ones, who are already half-fairy.

I would tell you, Do not try to make friends with any of them, but you will anyway.


V.

Sooner or later (if you serve well, if you do not open the forbidden door and let the monster eat you), they will tell you about the game.

Summer battles Winter, Light battles Dark. This is the law of the world. And on the chessboard of the fairies, White battles Black.

In the glory of this battle, the pieces that are brave and strong may win their heart’s desire.


VI.

You already have forgotten how the mortal sun felt upon your face. You already know the bargain that brought you here was a lie.

If you came to save your sick mother, you fear she is dead already. If you came to free your captive sister, your fear she will be sent to Hell for the next tithe. If you came for love of an elf-knight, you are broken with wanting him, and yet he does not seem to know you.

Say yes.


Keep reading

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Sometimes, you need a poison plant for your lapel.

As with a lot of poisonous flowers, most people don’t know how to recognize it out and about. Ladies and gentlemen, may I present helleborous niger, black hellebore, hellebore, Christmas rose, winter rose or nisewort. Known as one of the four classical poisons (hellebore, nightshade, hemlock, and aconite) this winter flowering shade perennial is a prime example of beauty disguising danger. Low growing, this plant produces dark green foliage with 5-petaled blossoms in shades of pale green, white, pink, red and maroon (other cultivated species include flowers of black, brown, spotted and combinations of white with red tips and the like). Blooming in winter or early spring, all parts of the plant are poisonous. With irritation of the skin from contact with the sap to symptoms of vomiting, dizziness, nervous system depression, and convulsions from ingestion, the history of this plant is varied.

In Greek mythology, the seer Melampus used hellebore to cure King Proetus’s daughters of madness. Pliny the Elder gave specific instructions on harvesting the black roots of this flower for medicine or malintent. It’s theorized that Alexander the Great died after being given a medicinal dose of hellebore, while the First Sacred War (595-585BCE) was believed to have been won after the Greek military alliance poisoned the water supply of Kirrha with hellebore.

A key ingredient in classic flying ointments, it’s associated with Mars and Saturn with correspondences to water. Used in spells of banishment, exorcisms, protection and invisibility, it was also used to change the nature or other plants. Grafted onto other plants, or used as a fertilizer for fruit trees to make them unpleasant or unhealthy.

Look for helleborous niger, or helleborous officiales if you’re buying seeds. White hellebore or false hellebore looks the same, but is not the classic witch’s flower.

Happy planting everyone

Reblog if you’re part of those little, overlooked fandoms.
The tiny fantasy series fandoms.
The not-well-known game fandoms.
The cheesy box office failure fandoms.
The obscure book that got forgotten because of betsellers fandoms.
The fandoms people forget.
You exist.
You are there.
And don’t ever, EVER let anyone tell you your fandom isn’t valid.
It doesn’t matter if the thing has 10 fans or 10,000.
We are here, and we are just as obsessed and feels-ridden as the biggest fandoms.

how about an episode where the paladins are just wandering around a tropical planet looking for something (parts of the castle idk, Allura and Coran are doing repairs or something and give the gang a day off from being Voltron) and Lance walks into a poisonous flower. The flower causes him to fall in love with Keith, and the rest of the episode consists of Lance being completely head over heels out of his mind for Keith. Keith is just awkwardly rolling with it because “Oh, he’s just poisoned, he’ll stop soon.” he also is secretly enjoying the attention

Eventually the poison wears off and everyone’s back at the castle. The episode ends with Allura explaining that that particular flower can only enhance emotions, not create them. 

Here, The last of my series of Poisonous Flowers

N° 6: Deadly Nightshade (Atropa Belladonna)

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The most poisonous and powerful of all plants, called the “Berry of the Witches”
The poisoning symptoms start with high fever, mouth dryness, blurred vision because of dilated pupils, vomiting, excessive stimulation of the heart, drowsiness, slurred speech, hallucinations, confusion, disorientation, delirium, and agitation. Coma and convulsions often precede death, but something recurring in all the process are the intense hallucinations.

It was used in the Witchcraft for potions, curses and rituals, being a powerful hallucinogen, also it was used as eye drops for dilatation of the pupil, sometimes leading to blindness.

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Materials: Graphite, marker, color pencils, gouache and ink on recycled leaf-textured paper

Happy October