point of conception

By the time Viktor Nikiforov finds Katsuki Yuuri, he is completely and thoroughly touch starved. 

Viktor has been without physical affection for far too long, wanting and wishing for it all the time and not getting it. Yes, he has Makkachin, and most days he thinks to himself that he has no idea what he would’ve done without his faithful poodle over the years–but the lack of people in his life who he could talk to and hug and touch weighs heavily on his heart.  

Naturally, when he finds Yuuri, he gravitates towards him, finds himself absurdly clingy all the time. Viktor is the touchy type anyways, he’s always known that he’s a very tactile and affectionate person, but with Yuuri it’s different. Yuuri lets Viktor hold his hand in public, kisses him goodbye when they part ways,  doesn’t protest too much when Viktor pulls him into his lap–except for the way that he mumbles “Viktor!” in a faux disapproving tone under his breath and blushes a little, but he doesn’t resist. In fact, he always melts into Viktor’s arms like he’s dying for Viktor’s touch as well. 

It’s not always easy for Viktor, though. Sometimes he finds himself reaching out for Yuuri because he’s scared–scared that one day, all too soon, he’ll reach out and Yuuri’s hand one be there to hold his own, that he’ll have to wake up in the morning without Yuuri’s solid, warm form pressed against the length of his own. Sometimes, he finds himself reaching out to touch Yuuri because he needs a reminder that Yuuri is really there, needs reassurance that can only be given by proof that Yuuri is real and solid and warm beneath his hands. 

Yuuri kisses him, holds him, strokes his hair, touches him back like he knows. Like he knows how much Viktor needs this. Viktor doesn’t like to voice his fears out loud, but Yuuri has always been good at being a silent and reliable source of comfort for him. When Viktor crawls into Yuuri’s lap, or rests his head on his shoulder, or idly starts running his fingers over Yuuri’s, tracing every crease and line like he’s memorizing it… Yuuri just accepts him happily, holds him close, lets Viktor soak up his warmth and comfort. 

Viktor feels unbelievably lucky to have Yuuri by his side, but a part of him worries. He’s touch starved and now he’s getting his fill, and every passing day with Yuuri reminds him that he couldn’t go back to being alone again. 

So he holds on, always hoping that he’ll never be forced to let go. 

(anime/yoi only blog:@viktorkatsuki)

anonymous asked:

Concept, based on the 'looking sharp' thing: Hanzo realizes Mcree was flirting with him like an hour afterwards and breaks a bit inside

genji finds him on the floor half an hour later

(first part!!)

Concept: one of those hard-boiled detective novels with the first-person narration, except the protagonist’s internal monologue keeps drifting off on irrelevant tangents, then snapping back to the present in completely implausible situations, leaving the reader to work out purely from context how they got from point A to point B.

fuck the concept art

the concept art book has made the Overwatch fandom literal cancer

People being all like ‘i want my sweet sensitive black character who’s probably gay’

Have y'all met Lucio or do you just forget he exists???? Overwatch is so rich with different cultures and characters but you’re so focussed on what one white character could have been you’re forgetting characters that already exist.

Personally I love Mercy - as a white Brit I find it really refreshing to hear her speaking German rather than just being standard American! (Or the horrific British stereotype they forced on Tracer lmao sorry Tracer mains)

But the main point of this post is the culture and strong characters already in the game -we’ve got Doomfist, an activist, a fighter, incredibly intelligent and most importantly a leader but you want soft and sensitive? One word: Lucio

This sweet boy doesn’t get anywhere near enough attention - he’s a strong role model, a sports icon, a musician and most importantly: a healer.

prongswhatthefuck2  asked:

What are some good tips for getting started with writing a book? I have a concept but i can't put it into place.

Getting Started with Your Story

There’s no one way to start writing a book. For some people, it’s enough to just jump in and start writing to see where the story takes them. If you’re not too keen on that idea, then here is one process (as in, not the only process) that might help you move beyond your concept. 

  • Concept ≠ Plot

Many writers mistake concept for plot, but they’re actually two very different things. A world where everyone grows up with superpowers is a concept; the plot is what you decide to write about within that concept - the specific characters and what happens to those characters; who your antagonist is and what conflict arises when that antagonist goes after what they want. All of these things contribute to your plot. 

So first, define what it is you actually have at this particular point. Do you just have a concept? If so, you’ll need to take the necessary steps to develop that concept into a plot. 

  • Concept >>> Plot

If you’ve decided that all you really have is a concept, then how do you take it and turn it into a plot? You brainstorm. All brainstorming really amounts to is expanding your ideas. All you’re doing is asking questions about the concept and delving deep into the answers. 

The most simplistic way to start this process, especially if you’re struggling, is to ask one of two questions (or both, if applicable). These two questions: What could go wrong? What could go right?

Going back to my example about a world where everyone grows up with superpowers. If I were to ask the question “what could go wrong,” I’d end up with a whole list of possibilities. 

  • The powers suddenly disappear
  • People start abusing their powers
  • Someone figures out how to steal powers
  • A hierarchy of strong vs. weak powers develops, creating superiority/inferiority dynamics
  • Someone is born without a superpower

There are many more possibilities I didn’t even think of here, but any one (or more) of these could become a plot. Choose one that sounds interesting, and then ask yourself “and then what?” 

Say I choose: Someone figures out how to steal powers. Then what does that person do? Do they recruit people to do the dirty work for them? Do they work alone? Do they hoard these powers and barter them for other goods? Do they attempt to enslave people? Do they attempt to take control of institutions? What do they do?

Your goal is to take your ideas and turn them into actions taken by characters. People doing things. And each piece you add will usually lead into another. If you went with the idea that this character is stealing powers and essentially selling them for other goods, you’d have to ask yourself follow-up questions. First, who are they selling to? Why would anyone buy a new superpower if they already have one? What uses would they have for additional ones? What is the key demographic that this person is trying to reach? Secondly, what are they selling them in exchange for? Money? Favors? Souls? What is this character getting in return?

Now that you’ve examined potential actions that the character takes, you’ve also exposed potential new characters. 

  • People they’re stealing from
  • People they’re bargaining with
  • People that try to police these crimes
  • People that try to copy this character’s process

At the beginning of this section, I talked about using “what could go right” as another optional jumping off point. This is a good path to follow if your concept is already really negative. For a concept where someone is killing people for some pointed reason, you might ask “what could go right” and explore ideas where the killer is caught and brought to justice. 

The point of all this is to think about change as a means of taking your idea from concept to plot. A concept is static - it doesn’t move, evolve, or change. By developing a plot, you’re forcing the concept to be challenged in some way. If you think about it that way, you’ll be able to formulate conflicts, and the people that orchestrate and fight against those conflicts. 

On that note, I think we’re ready to move onto the third piece of my graphic above. 

  • Plot = Character Actions and Consequences

At this point, you have sketches for characters. You’ve got this nameless, faceless person that is stealing the powers, and all these other nameless, faceless people that I listed above. In essence, we have character concepts. And just like we turned our initial concept into a plot, we have to turn these character concepts into actual characters. 

The basics are the easiest way to start. You figure out their name, their gender identity, their age, their appearance, some brief backstory and personality traits. I personally prefer the simplest questionnaire that I put together back in the early days because it hits on the poignant pieces of a character without overwhelming you with 100s of questions. 

Now that you’ve given your character concepts names and faces and potential behaviors, you start to consider how one character’s view of the world inspires them to take certain actions, and you then think about how those actions affect your entire story. 

We already kind of talked about the motives of the power thief in our example, but definitely delve deep here. On the surface, this character seems bad - stealing from people and then selling what they steal. But depending on what it is they’re getting in return, could we not argue that this character is a supernatural Robin Hood? Maybe instead of selling, they’re giving, and maybe the characters they’re stealing powers from are people that abuse and misuse their powers. Character motives can take a plot and turn it on its head, forcing you to reconceptualize everything. And that’s okay! That’s part of the process.

But separate from that idea, if we have a character concept of someone whose powers were stolen, and after developing their basic backstory, we discover that person’s name is Rose, and she has an especially close relationship with her brother. So when her powers are stolen, how does this affect her life? Was she using her powers to keep her brother alive and protected? What she using them to keep a roof over their heads? Was she using them as part of her job, as a means of providing? What happens to her life when her powers are stolen? And what will Rose do about it? Whatever Rose does will impact the story. If she does nothing to get her powers back, how does she solve her problems and does that make for a good story? If she does decide to act, then you’ve moved onto a new plot point to dive deeper into.

My point is, character concepts come from plots, but characters themselves often create plot, as their decisions and mistakes and successes create new outcomes. So if I could modify my original flow chart:

Before you develop something, you conceptualize it. You have a concept, then you make it a plot. You have concepts for characters, then you make them characters. And those characters end up driving your plot, to the point that this happens:

Plot inspires character. Character inspires plot. And it just keeps going around and around and around. Breaking it down into these pieces helps organize the process, but developing a story is rarely this neat and tidy. You’ll get ideas that don’t make sense, ideas that aren’t cohesive, characters you don’t need, characters that piss you off, problems you can’t solve, or plot points you’ve committed to that you no longer like…it will be messy. But it’s your mess, and the more you work on developing your own process, the more it’ll make sense to you. And it’ll become easier to know how to go about fixing it when something’s not right. 

Have fun with this process! It’s supposed to be fun. When the pieces start to become clearer, you’re able to put them together in a rough outline. And once you have a rough outline, you can start writing, and really see it take shape. 

-Rebekah

Concept: the next Fallout game just rips off the exact plot of I Want My Hat Back. No family drama, no existential threats, no automatic entanglement in wasteland politics - you’re just some asshole who really loves their hat. It goes missing one day, and you’ll do anything to get it back.

on Big Deal Moments in Discworld

Guards! Guards! has one of the first Big Deal Discworld moments for me, and I’m not very good at articulating what that means.

The moment I’m thinking of is the dragon’s speech to Wonse – “we were supposed to be cruel, cunning, heartless and terrible. But…we never burned and tortured and ripped one another apart and called it morality.” That’s a passage that always makes me stop and reread it a couple of times. And it’s a small moment – it’s the only time we hear the dragon speak at all, and it’s a speech that has no bearing on the rest of the story. It could have been taken out of the book entirely and nothing would feel like it was missing. But the fact that it’s there is a Big Deal moment. The great big monstrous antagonist’s judgment of humanity is unavoidable in its accuracy.

And the Discworld series is full of moments like that. Sometimes it’s just one line, sometimes it’s a full scene, and most of the book is so full of shenanigans coming so quickly one after another that you don’t always see the Big Deal moments coming. We think of Pratchett as a humor/satire writer and yes, the books are hilarious, but in between the jokes are these Big Deal moments that casually rearrange our perspective and stick with us even after we think we’ve forgotten.

Then there are the other Big Deal Moments, that are Emotional Meteorite Strike Moments (e.g. the phrase “that is not my cow” can now instantly put me in the fetal position) but I’m having a hard enough time describing this one as it is so I’ll probably go on a tirade about those ‘round about that One Part in Feet of Clay. (You know the one.)

Functional miniature crossbow! Made with a chopstick, metal wire and elastic thread.

Art by EoD, 24/8 2017

Keep reading

8

Why doesn’t anyone — in drawings or fics or whatever — ever address the fact that any AU-name references an infinite number of timilines???

Note: Despite what this comic seems to suggest, it’s not recommended to ever try using Ink as a multiverse taxi. For your own sanity and safety.


(Ink belongs to @comyet. Sorry for constantly dragging him into explaining and questioning multiverse rules.)

From a Certain Point of View

Or, how Ben Kenobi’s boldfaced lie prevarication saved the Galaxy (but not in the way he thought it would).


Part One

  • Shortly before the beginning of ESB, Luke accidentally winds up in the past, conveniently appearing right next to Anakin Skywalker, new Jedi Knight. 
  • After convincing Anakin that he is indeed his son from the future – this takes a great deal of time and no small amount of effort – Luke begins to warn him about the Dreadful Future that awaits the galaxy… only to be returned to his own time/universe before he can finish the story.
    • But hey, Luke is sure that Anakin won’t have any problems figuring out the Emperor’s true identity. At least he was able to get across the important information, yeah? 
      • At least he got to warn his father about Darth Vader.
  • There’s just one little problem: Luke doesn’t know that Vader is the same person as Anakin Skywalker.
  • So when Luke warned his father that some student of Ben’s was going to go Dark Side, destroy the Jedi, betray and murder both Ben and Anakin himself, and probably kill Luke’s mother while he’s at it, Anakin drew the obvious conclusions:
    • #1: He (Anakin) is the only padawan Obi-Wan has ever had.
    • #2: If that Dreadful Future of his son’s is to come true, that obviously means that Obi-Wan is going to take on another padwan in the near future. 
    • #3: Therefore, in order to prevent the nightmare that is Luke’s world, all Anakin has to do is make sure that Obi-Wan never gets another padawan.
      • Easy, right? 
        • …Right?

Keep reading

4

For @themutantunderground

The Gifted AU: John, in the process of tracking his brother, James, finds himself face to face with him. 

How to take notes from a textbook

Knowing what to and what not to write down from a textbook is a often an issue when studying. Should I include this or is that completely necessary? Hopefully these few tips will help anyone struggle to use their textbook!

  • Read the textbook prior to taking notes - This helps give you a solid understanding of the material so you can summarise and shorten your notes. Have a good understanding is great to help shorten your notes, since you can avoid copying the menial information.
  • Highlight some key points, terms and concepts before taking notes - Remember not to over-highlight, keep it brief and minimal; key words, facts, and statistics!
  • Have a colour coding system - This helps to visualise your notes when trying to memorise information and also makes your notes more effective material to learn from. Making sure you’re using the same colours for highlighting your textbook and writing your notes. My colour coding system can be found here.
  • Use the layout of the textbook to organise your notes - I found copying the headings and subheadings really helped simplify and ensure I was learning each section. It’s much easy to find information when you’re skimming through notes. This also ensures that you can remember what topic areas relate to others, meaning you can add more into your essays under exam conditions!
  • Include different ways to show the information - Use mindmaps, bullet points, graphs, flow chats, and post-it notes to help visualise the content. Breaking up your notes with graphics is a good way to avoid full pages of writing and great for memorising statistics or key elements of a topic.
  • Supplement your notes - Use other textbooks and your own research to expand the depth of your notes. This is highly important for subjects that can require evidence, statistics and evaluations. Making sure this information is embedded into your notes is great for writing essays.
  • Add your own personal touch - Add doodles, acronyms, and abbreviations to help your study. Little things that make important information unique and standout will help you recall it later!
  • Summarise each chapter - Make a final summary of each chapter using sticky notes or flash cards. Once you’ve read your textbook, you’ll have a collection of chapter summaries ready to study from.

Each of these tips have helped me recreate notes that are well-rounded and full of brief but useful information. I hope this information helps. Let me know if it does!