Elizabeth Cady Stanton
petitioned the United States government
and went in front of Congress
every year for decades
to ask for the vote for women.

She died before women got the vote,
but she did this every year.

She was imprisoned.
She was beaten.
She went on hunger strikes.
She lived her own life.

ECS is someone you need to know about.

(She had quite a lot to say about religion too
in so much as she felt that all organized religion
kept women in their place
And was absolutely detrimental to anything
women wanted to achieve
as far as equality went in this world)

ECS said this:

“The prolonged slavery of women
is the darkest page in human history.”

…and it carries on all the time

And you can’t tell me that it doesn’t.

And you can say that we’ve
made progress in a thousand different ways
obviously, we have

When Boko Haram runs wild

When [Malala Yousafzai] was shot in the face by
religious fanatics for wanting to get an education

When we know that there’s
an international slave trade in women…

Drunk History and Upright Citizen Brigade Theatre’s Allan McLeod tells a humiliating ghost story on Slumber Party!

The darling, drawling Southern funny dude Allan McLeod of Drunk History and UCB hits our deck for a lantern-lit episode featuring the most embarrassing ghost story ever. GET INTO IT.

buttahlove asked:

Hey Ches!!!! I'm new to the podcast world (swipe my late pass...) and I thoroughly enjoy your show with your husband. Besides 2browngirls, what other podcasts do you listen to that you'd recommend? Forgive me if you've answered this already...

Hey! Thanks! No apologies necessary. I looove podcasts, so I’m always down to talk about them. Here are my favs in no particular order: 

  •  The Read   - ”Join bloggers Kid Fury and Crissle for their weekly “read” of hip-hop and pop culture’s most trying stars. Throwing shade and spilling tea with a flippant and humorous attitude, no star is safe from Fury and Crissle unless their name is Beyonce. Or Blue Ivy. As recent transplants to New York City (Fury from Miami and Crissle from Oklahoma City), The Read also serves as an on air therapy session for two friends trying to adjust to life (and rats) in the big city.”

  • 2 Brown Girls  -  "Two Brown Girls is a pop culture, film, and television podcast hosted by writers and critics Fariha Roisin and Zeba Blay."

  • This American Life - "There’s a theme to each episode of This American Life, and a variety of stories on that theme. It’s mostly true stories of everyday people, though not always. There’s lots more to the show, but it’s sort of hard to describe. Probably the best way to understand the show is to start at our favorites page,”

  • Snap Judgement - “Snap Judgment is the smoking-hot new show from NPR. Winner of the Public Radio Talent Quest, Glynn Washington delivers a raw, musical brand of storytelling, daring listeners to see the world through the eyes of another.”

  • Radio Lab - “On Radiolab, science meets culture and information sounds like music. Each episode of Radiolab® is an investigation — a patchwork of people, sounds, stories and experiences centered around One Big Idea. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, Radiolab is produced by WNYC public radio.”

  • Serial - "Serial is a new podcast from the creators of This American Life, hosted by Sarah Koenig. Serial unfolds one story - a true story - over the course of a whole season. The show follows the plot and characters wherever they lead, through many surprising twists and turns. Sarah won’t know what happens at the end of the story until she gets there, not long before you get there with her. Each week she’ll bring you the latest chapter, so it’s important to listen in, starting with Episode 1."

  • Invisibilia - "Invisibilia (Latin for all the invisible things) is about the invisible forces that control human behavior - ideas, beliefs, assumptions and emotions. Co-hosted by Lulu Miller and Alix Spiegel, Invisibilia interweaves narrative storytelling with scientific research that will ultimately make you see your own life differently."

  • The Moth - "Since its launch in 1997, The Moth has presented thousands of true stories, told live and without notes, to standing-room-only crowds worldwide. Moth storytellers stand alone, under a spotlight, with only a microphone and a roomful of strangers. The storyteller and the audience embark on a high-wire act of shared experience which is both terrifying and exhilarating. Since 2008, The Moth podcast has featured many of our favorite stories told live on Moth stages around the country. For information on all of our programs and live events, visit themoth.org."

  • Reply All - "A show about the internet, hosted by PJ Vogt and Alex Goldman. From Gimlet."
vimeo

A couple of years ago, a good friend of mine asked what the big deal was about Watchmen. That, via a lot of detours, led me to this speech where I talk Watchmen, its challenge to us as readers, its autobiographical impact, various bits of geeking out over formalism and everything else full of life and comics.

The Vimeo is linked above. If you prefer Youtube, you can find it here.

I performed it originally at Nine Worlds Geekfest. Due to various requests, I did a second performance a few months later, with some small additions. This time the lovely folks at Tomfoolery Pictures offered to film it for the record. After months of labour, here’s the finished version. Hail them.

Hope you find it interesting.

Thanks to: Tomfoolery generally for the filming and Adam specifically for making the offer, GOSH comics for hosting it, Chrissy Williams for putting on her best received pronunciation for the intro, Jon Browne for inspiring it, Nine Worlds Geekfest for prompting its writing and original 100% adrenaline and nerves airing, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons for a comickybook and the Nine Panel Grid for being perfect beyond all human ability to judge.

NPR is working on ways to help people discover podcasts — and we need your help! We’re looking for podcasts from public radio and beyond, and we’d love for you to share some of your favorite episodes with us. Here’s the ONLY rule: If you are someone who creates radio or podcasts, please don’t recommend anything produced by you or the organization you work for. 

Over the next few weeks we’ll compile your suggestions, wrangle them into a sortable guide, and publish a tool that will help connect you with great listening. We can’t wait to read your recommendations!

anonymous asked:

Sorry if this is a strange and random question, but do you listen to any podcasts? and if you do, would you have any to recommend?

i listen to three on a regular basis:

the first two podcasts are predicated on the idea of putting several smart enthusiastic eloquent people who like each other in a room and having them riff off each other, it’s delightful. 

the third—is weird, because i actually can’t stand one of the presenters, but i’ll suffer through him because i think mark kermode is an honest-to-god gift to the world and to film criticism (c.f. the post about jupiter ascending), he loves film so much, his knowledge of it is vast and encyclopaedic, he’s a dyed-in-the-wool socialist and a feminist who defers to the opinions of women, our opinions on things align more than i’m comfortable with, i genuinely enjoy listening to him talk about almost anything. 

things i dip into at random:

  • bbc radio 4’s in our time: put academics in a room, ask them about a topic, it’s like a very short introduction. 
  • there’s a website called backdoor broadcasting, which records academic podcasts on everything from cosmology to shakespeare to greek deities and dualism; i love dipping into the archives. 
  • oxford university’s podcast site (just listened to a talk about woolf’s to the lighthouse and cognition)
  • the bugle: john oliver does a comedy podcast with andy zaltzman, and sometimes it’s an absolute riot
Ep 34: Veronica Roth


Grab a Fiji water and a pillow mint and imagine you’re in a Boston hotel room with me and Veronica Roth, author New York Times bestselling DIVERGENT series, as we talk about writing being the way grown-ups get to play pretend, embracing critique, and marveling at people who think first drafts are fun.


Listen now!

Image courtesy of Jess Walter and Sherman Alexie 

Authors Jess Walter (left) and Sherman Alexie have a podcast called “A Tiny Sense Of Accomplishment.” I just discovered it thanks to Electric Literature’s list of their favorite literary podcasts, and it’s my new favorite thing. They answer listener questions about writing, conduct author interviews and read drafts of their own work.

They call themselves “the Car Talk of scribes.”  And their podcast actually is kind of like Car Talk. It’s funny, and it makes you feel like everything will be okay.

—Lidia Jean 

Tell Us: What’s Your Favorite Podcast Episode

NPR is working on ways to help people discover podcasts — and we need your help. We’re looking for podcasts from public radio and beyond, and we’d love for you to share some of your favorite episodes with us.

Here’s the ONLY rule: If you are someone who creates radio or podcasts, please don’t recommend anything produced by you or the organization you work for.

Over the next few weeks we’ll compile your suggestions, wrangle them into a sortable guide, and publish a tool that will help connect you with great listening.

Please fill out this form and tell us about your favorite podcasts!

The 11 best geek culture podcasts to listen to right now

There are so many great podcasts now that it’s hard to keep track. Welcome to Night Vale and The Thrilling Adventure Hour are the obvious choices if you have any interest in audio fiction, but it’s a little harder to pick out the best fandom talk shows and geeky discussion podcasts. That’s why we’ve been taking a careful look at what’s on offer, and have whittled the many options down to a streamlined list of 11.

Some of these are fandom-specific (very specific, in the case of cartoon Batman psychoanalysis podcast The Arkham Sessions) while others are more general, but all of them are definitely worth a listen.

1) The Baker Street Babes

Sherlock Holmes fandom is intimidatingly huge, and intimidatingly long-lived. So, the enduring popularity of the Baker Street Babes should prove their quality as Sherlock Holmes commentators.

[Read more]