plus sixe

J'ai beau détester la chaleur et l'été mais j'en ai tout de même de bons moments , j'aime ouvrir les coquelicots avant que leur bouton floral n'ait pu le faire et ainsi découvrir le beau rouge caché, crier tout près du ventilateur et m'amuser à écouter ma voix déformée, chercher le moindre sol qui ne soit pas brûlant et où je pourrais me coller pour me rafraîchir un tant soit peu.
Par contre c'est aussi la période où j'ai le plus envie d'être six pieds sous terre.

Anonymous said: Could you maybe write something with the smiths and pines families for #26(thanksgiving)

I wasn’t really sure what to write so I opted for illustrating this prompt instead. Happy Thanksgiving to my fellow Canadians!

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guess who’s still (re)watching detective conan? it’s me, and i can’t believe i forgot how good shinichi and hattori are together, especially when they spend entire episodes just out to get each other

(the plus side of being six years old is the ability to shriek at the top of your lungs to shut your arch-rival up without making yourself look bad)

anonymous asked:

okay but like… overwatch seems especially attractive to tall people (reyes, reinhardt, zarya, etc.), so the watchpoints are all built around the idea that the average human height is six foot plus. and since there’s not a chance in hell he’s gonna go fetch a Tall Person ™ to get things down from the top shelves, hanzo starts climbing all over shit to reach the high places. he free-climbs up walls, he can handle a set of kitchen cabinets. he is a hero to the short people on base.

This is a really good point and an amazing headcanon, and as a smol person myself i fully embrace this like you have no idea.
The man is also a master of furniture jenga, who can and will use anything he can lift to reach his destination. And being the master of pranks (@blckwatchmccree & I decided this), He is the smol terror the tol’s fear in the dark kitchen when hunting for midnight snacks… they never know what cabinet they might find him in ready to strike. 

Top 6 Apps for Learning Mandarin Chinese

Last summer, while I was supposed to be studying French intensively, I accidentally started studying Mandarin instead. These things happen! The best thing about Mandarin compared to some other languages I’ve studied (specifically Persian and Korean) is that there are a huge number of resources available to help learners, including a lot of very well-designed apps. After months of obsessively checking the iTunes store for the best apps and trying them out, these are my favorite six (plus a few more worth mentioning). They appear in ascending order from my least favorite to my most favorite.

Worth mentioning: A couple of apps not included on this list but worth mentioning are Pleco and Skritter. 

Pleco is a highly-regarded Chinese dictionary. I have it on my phone and do use it, but I left it off the list because I prefer another (#6 on this list). Since I’m still very much a beginner, a thorough dictionary isn’t quite so important to me right now. However, it seems like every advanced student of Mandarin recommends this app, so I had to include it.

Skritter is another app that’s highly regarded among serious students. I believe it focuses on helping with character recognition and writing. It has a subscription service that is a bit expensive, which is why I’ve never tried it; however, everyone seems to rave about it. If you’re a serious student, you should definitely look into it.

Also, I recommend downloading some Chinese-language apps designed for preschoolers. I found several of them online in the iTunes store, and a lot of them include short stories with simple words, practice with basic characters, etc. Using these apps gives you some immersive listening practice, which is fun. They can be kind of hit and miss, so I recommend downloading all you can find and seeing what you can figure out and what you like. They won’t replace any of the apps below, but they still serve a purpose.

6. WCC Dictionary This is the dictionary I use instead of Pleco. I like it primarily because of its beautiful design (something Pleco doesn’t really have). This app is mainly a dictionary, but it offers a lot more than that. For example, it has a character scanner (so you can look up words you find in books by taking a picture of the character). It also has a “story library” with a few simple books to read (with Pinyin, the characters, an English translation, and the ability to listen to the story being read). Characters are color coded if you use that as a device to help you with tones. It has a flashcard program with pre-created word lists, extensive example sentences, a section on radicals with example words, and stroke order animations. It also offers a “character of the day” and daily “homework” to motivate you to use what you learn. The dictionary itself is free, but there’s a lot of content that you have to pay to unlock, although there’s also a way to buy the content using “coins” that you earn through using the app.

5. Mindsnacks Mandarin A lot of you are already familiar with the Mindsnacks app because it’s offered for a lot of different languages (and a few school subjects like geography). This app uses games to teach Mandarin, mostly focusing on vocabulary (not grammar or sentence construction). It’s a bit limited, but it can be a really fun way to learn. After a while, the games start to feel repetitive and can get boring, but the app also has you move through levels (which allow you to unlock new games) and uses other incentives to keep you playing. The audio is an actual human, too, which is a big benefit since many apps and programs rely on Google Translate robot voices. This is a paid app, which could be a drawback.

4. FluentU This app is the reason I started learning Mandarin in the first place. I tried using it for French, but I felt like my French was too advanced to gain much from it. Even though there were advanced-level videos with vocabulary I didn’t know, FluentU doesn’t do a good job of adapting to your level and guessing which words will give you trouble. That’s perfectly fine for a beginner, though, since every word will probably give you trouble, which is why I used it for Mandarin. I think the makers of FluentU are Chinese speakers, and they seem to have focused more on Mandarin in their app. They have a built-in course you can follow, using videos they made themselves for teaching the language. The videos are pretty good, and you will feel like you’re learning a lot. There are also a lot of other videos if you want to branch out, including some catchy songs and clips from commercials or TV shows. The built-in flashcard system is a good way to review, but there’s no way to adjust their algorithms, so you might end up reviewing the same words way too often. I stopped using the program when I had 400+ words to review every day, and I just couldn’t keep up and continue advancing. This app is also very limited in the free version, and the paid subscription is VERY pricey, in my opinion, especially considering that there are other apps out there that offer more features. All of the videos are on YouTube anyway, so you can still use them to learn as you advance (or if you have a friend who can help you). I recommend this app if you want to pay for one month and use it to study intensively and advance quickly. That’s what I did, and I think it helped me out a lot.

3. ChineseSkill This is the first app that was designed to be a “Duolingo for Mandarin,” and it has a lot of great features. There’s the typical “tree” like in Duolingo, where you advance through different lessons one by one. It teaches character recognition, pronunciation, and grammar. The lessons can be really challenging for a beginner (sometimes too challenging, I thought), but it covers a lot of material. I’m not completely happy with the order in which lessons are taught (for example, there’s a lesson on shapes near the beginning that has you learn words like “triangle,” which seemed unimportant to me). The other drawback is there isn’t an easy way to review what you’ve learned (like on Duolingo when your gold-level lessons start to fade). It’s possible, but not super easy to access. Other interesting features include a tone game, a pinyin chart, a “survival kit” that’s like a travel phrasebook, and practice with stroke order. Also, this app is 100% free, which is amazing! I definitely recommend this app.

2. Social Language This app is really different from the others and is probably the most useful if you believe in speaking a language as soon as possible. I don’t think a lot of English speakers know about it because it seems to be marketed mostly to Chinese speakers. It’s a bit hard to explain, but I’ll try my best: basically, there’s a tree like you have for Duolingo, but the exercises are all to improve your speaking and pronunciation. You work through the lessons, and Chinese-speaking users rate and comment on your recordings. They can even leave voice messages to help you improve. You can do the same for them (in fact, you have to if you want to unlock higher levels). That alone makes the app worth downloading, but even better is that it includes a CHAT FEATURE that makes it very easy to interact with native speakers. You can see the profiles of hundreds of Chinese speakers who are online at any given time of day, and you can send a text or voice message to them and later add them to your friends’ list. What’s more,the ratio of Chinese to English speakers heavily favors English speakers. You will find hundreds of Chinese speakers eager to practice their English, and often you will be one of only a handful of English speakers on the app, meaning you have instant access to a chat partner any time of day or night. Have a question about your homework, something you read, or a phrase you don’t know how to pronounce? Instant, free tutoring is available 24/7 on this app, which is also FREE! I met some really nice people here without the pressure of a more formal language exchange. You can have a casual conversation any time you want, and it’s like text messaging so there’s less pressure if you’re shy about speaking Chinese. The only drawback is the same as with all language exchanges, which is that it’s sometimes difficult to balance the two languages. Also, I had problems with sending voice messages in chat, which can be frustrating. Overall, though, I’d say Social Language is a must-have.

1. HelloChinese This app didn’t exist last summer when I was looking for a Mandarin version of Duolingo, but I discovered it last week and fell in love with it. It actually has fewer features than ChineseSkill, but the pacing seems much better, and it focuses more heavily on pronunciation (though the speech recognition software isn’t perfect and you will sometimes need to skip a speaking question just to keep moving forward). It comes with some good grammar explanations and a really basic flashcard program for review. Honestly, I feel bad for rating it higher than ChineseSkill since ChineseSkill has been around longer and offers a lot more features, but I feel like HelloChinese just makes more sense and is easier to stick with than ChineseSkill. Like ChineseSkill, it’s also 100% free! I consider HelloChinese to be my “core” app for casual study, with the other apps acting as supplements. If you’re a more serious student, HelloChinese might not be your #1 pick, but it’s great for beginners who like the structure of an app like DuoLingo.

7

@theasgardiandetective’s Character Art Commissions!

That’s right, it’s been a long, long time coming; but I’m finally doing character commissions! :D

So how’s this gonna work? Well, as this is my first time doing commissions, I’ll be testing the waters by taking work over the course of a week - from the 15th till the 22nd August 2016. (although that timeslot may of course change depending on how things go :O)

That said, here’s the rundown:

  1. Want a commission of your fave character? Cool!
  2. Check that I still have slots available by quickly checking out the description of my blog (seriously, check before making any requests y’all)
  3. Read the terms under the cut!
  4. Anything unclear after reading that? Feel free to hit up my askbox with any queries!
  5. Once you’re ready, send a request my way via email!

FULL TERMS AND CONTACT INFO UNDER THE CUT!

Keep reading

Kagome went back at like 18? She knew Inuyasha for 6 months. Aint no true love happening at six months. Plus you’re 18. You dont know shit about real life?

We all sacrificed shit for people we thought we loved. But  gurl. Bet InuKag broke up after a year. I bet on this.

Like.

We all been in Kagome’s shoes where we’re star-y eyed and heart eyed over a boy. We’ve all also had our hearts crushed.

You would think losing against a guy who never held public office and who lied every single time he opened his mouth would make them re-examine their assumptions about their centrist “electability”, but nah, they’re doubling down on a failed strategy. It’s gonna be eight years of Trump because the Democrats do not know how to win an election or appeal to anyone without a six plus figure income.

Just another incredible thing about Inej Ghafa

Is it just me that loves how religious she is? She is spiritual and that is a core part of her character. Usually kick butt female protagonist never even mention religion, or they don’t have one. But Ms frikin awesome author has given us a character who turns her spirituality into strength. It shows us a character whose beliefs only make her stronger, and she doesn’t shy away from them.

I think it’s incredible

2

Though Emilio appreciates everyone wanting to beat up Trent, he doesn’t want Rocco involved :O Emilio is a closed book omfg making’ shit harder.

Bonus: 

He kinda already knew Trent anyway :OOOOO