play case

Okay so it seems like people will call any mallet percussion instrument a xylophone and I’m here to teach you shit.

This is a xylophone. The wood part is thick and it’s high pitched.

This is a marimba. It’s huge and expensive. No like a small one costs over $4,000 (3186.20 euros). The key things are really long and thin.

Now do you see this beautiful instrument? This is called the vibraphone motherfuckers. Or just the vibes. Anyways it sounds amazing. I could marry the sound. Basically, it;s made of metal and you have a pedal to stop it from ringing too long.

This is the glockenphejksdfjkl. I have no idea how to spell it, so lets just call it the orchestral bells. If you hit this shit too loud it can burst your eardrums. 

These are a joke.

when i was like 14, i once wore contact lenses instead of glasses to school bc i had just learned how to put them on and i wanted to show them to my friends right, and this one guy goes and tells me “i thought girls were supposed to become beautiful when they stopped wearing glasses. something obviously went wrong with you” and that was??? so incredibly rude i wanted to cry but i just stood there not knowing what to say bc i honestly thought we were friends

but the girl sitting in front of him (who was also his crush, mind u) hears him and turns around with the most disgusted expression on her face, and calls him out on it like “omg i cant believe you said that have you even seen yourself in a mirror you have no right to tell her shit” and then she turns to me and says “dont listen to him, you look gorgeous with or without glasses” and she probably already forgot about that but i always remember it whenever i feel self-conscious about myself

so the moral of the story is: if u see someone being a jerk to someone else, dont laugh along and call them out on it. stick together and bring all the fuckboys down

3

Naruto Week 2017 // Day Seven
             Free Day // “No matter how far away you are, we will always be under the same sun, moon, and stars.”

Ń͓ ͖̜̟̱̜I̛͇̹͓̗ ̼̼̯͉̻G͈͍͟ ̤H̜ ͕̫̲̗T͍̞̳̘͈̘ ̢̜̰̭̰M̧̜̺̞̫̖̤ ̮̼̺̭ͅͅA҉̣͕̫͓̬ ̯̮̮̼͜R͙̰͈̖̣͘ ̞̫̙̟̝͖̩E̷̤ ͍͓̝̯̞͔.͇ ͉̜̞̣̹̗ͅE̟̻̯̫͔ ̯̘̝̟̩͢Y̧̱̜̜͚ ̧̣̩͙͚͕̻̣E̙͉̯ ̫̯́S̱̗͔̳̣͍

6

I like you wielding a gun. Did it feel good?

littyr  asked:

what do you think drives lady macbeth's cruelty and do you sympathise with her at all?

This post and this post might be of interest. But I think ‘cruelty’ is the wrong word. Cruelty implies violence for the sake of violence and enjoyment of violence. (See here.) Lady M doesn’t revel in the violence. She doesn’t delight in it the way some of the characters in, say, Titus Andronicus do, or even Margaret in Henry VI does after the murder of Rutland/during the murder of York. For Lady M violence is always a means to an end. “Infirm of purpose” is what she calls her husband when he starts to get faint-hearted. He’s too full of the milk of human kindness “to catch the nearest way.” For her, it’s all about the outcome. The ends justify the means. Like I said in one of those posts, I think her driving force is ambition. She wants more than what she has. 

Interestingly, she never expresses any personal desire to be queen. She does, however, use the singular possessive pronoun ‘my’ when she says “The raven himself is hoarse / That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan / Under my battlements.” She claims the crime as her own, and even though the idea of murder occurs to her and her husband independently, she is the criminal mastermind. She says,you shall put / This night’s great business into my dispatch; / Which shall to all our nights and days to come / Give solely sovereign sway and masterdom.” And at the end of the scene: “Leave all the rest to me.” This regicide is her baby–and I use that word very deliberately. There are a million possible explanations for why Lady Macbeth is so desperate to seize this power for her husband. My guess is it has something to do with that baby she mentions in 1.7 which doesn’t appear in the play. A woman’s function at this point in history was basically to be a baby-making machine and ensure the survival of her husband’s line. She hasn’t been able to do that (for whatever reason) and her husband, at least, is already middle-aged, so that procreation window is rapidly closing, if it’s not closed already. By early modern standards, that’s a huge dynastic failure. My guess is that her power-grabbing is about agency and compensation. Maybe she can’t continue Macbeth’s line, but she can make him king. And she does

But here’s the other part of it which I think is really important and often gets overlooked, and it goes back to the fact that Lady M never expresses a personal desire to be queen. She wants her husband to be king, and she thinks he is fully deserving of that office. “Thou wouldst be great;” she says, “Art not without ambition, but without / The illness should attend it.” AND THIS IS SO KEY. Because Lady M is nothing if not full of ambition. What she’s saying here is “You don’t have enough darkness in your soul to do this, so I’m going to do it for you.” Now. Is that somewhat fucked up? Absolutely. However, that is an enormous sacrifice to make. I’m not going to get into this in depth, but there’s a lot of natural law theory floating around in this play. What’s important to know is this: In the protestant ethos of this play, if you commit regicide, you are 100% going to be damned for eternity. There’s no doubt about that. So, in an insane backwards way, this is actually an incredibly loving, selfless thing to do on Lady M’s part. She is willing to sacrifice her own salvation to make her husband king. Let that sink in. That is so much more hardcore than just saying, “I’d take a bullet for you, babe.” She is willing to burn for all time to put him on the throne, and not only is she willing, but it’s her idea, not just something she does with her back against the wall. That is a crazy kind of love. And that’s one of my favorite things about this play. This is not a unanimous opinion by any means, but I firmly believe that even though the Macbeths are terrible tyrannical people, they are desperately, devotedly in love with one another. Their language is incredibly intimate. In his first letter Macbeth addresses his wife as “My dearest partner of greatness,” and throughout the play they are constantly struggling to help and heal one another. Theirs is a relationship built on love and equality, whatever else they do (and however their relationship is also sometimes toxic and fractures through the play). Look at Macbeth’s conversation with the doctor in 5.3 when his wife’s health begins to fail: “ If thou couldst, doctor, cast / The water of my land, find her disease, / And purge it to a sound and pristine health, / I would applaud thee to the very echo, / That should applaud again.” That. Is. Love.

So. Why does Lady Macbeth do the terrible things she does? There’s no certain answer. Ambition has a lot to do with it. But I think that ambition is rooted in guilt about what she hasn’t been able to provide her husband with, and a passionate yearning to make up for that, somehow. Leo’s character says in Inception that positive emotion trumps negative emotion every time, and I think that’s true here. Lady M doesn’t orchestrate Duncan’s murder because she’s inherently cruel. She does it for love.

10

*inhales deeply* SO back in 2013, I made a shitty Ace Attorney PowerPoint so my bf could have context to all the shitty AA doodles I did. I’ve dug up this relic and decided to update it with all the hip and happening characters and plot. It’s spoiler free imo, except Mia, but it’s like known by anyone who has played past case 1-1, so….

AAI slides were done primarily by @doodleblah because I never got around to playing those and she loves them. Not everyone is on here because they’re just the characters I primarily draw so sorry von Karma, Kristoph, Dahlia, Fulbright, etc

“What really was happening as I was watching, it was surreal anyway, I was watching people start to have this panicked reaction in the crowd and guys were coming on with headsets and I felt like someone had been hurt. I thought there was some kind of medical situation, and I had this worst-case scenario playing out in my head, and then I just heard Moonlight won and I was so relieved that I started laughing. Truthfully, I was also so thrilled that Moonlight won. I know the director [Barry Jenkins] … I’ve worked with them before,” he explains. “It’s such a groundbreaking film, made for a million dollars, and incredible achievement and I’m so happy for them that they were being recognized.” — Ryan Gosling explains why he laughed during the Oscars mix-up

6

Philippa of Hainault
Queen consort of England 24 January 1328 – 15 August 1369
The lady whom we saw has not uncomely hair, betwixt blue-black and brown. Her head is clean-shaped; her forehead high and broad, and standing somewhat forward. Her face narrows between the eyes, and the lower part of her face is still more narrow and slender than her forehead. Her eyes are blackish-brown and deep. Her nose is fairly smooth and even, save that it is somewhat broad at the tip and also flattened, and yet it is no snub-nose. Her nostrils are also broad, her mouth fairly wide. Her lips somewhat full, and especially the lower lip. Her ears and chin are comely enough. Her neck, shoulders, and all her body are well set and unmaimed; and nought is amiss so far as a man may see. Moreover, she is brown of skin all over, and much like her father; and in all things she is pleasant enough, as it seems to us. And the damsel will be of the age of nine years on St. John’s day next to come, as her mother saith. She is neither too tall nor too short for such an age; she is of fair carriage, and well taught in all that becometh her rank, and highly esteemed and well beloved of her father and mother and of all her meinie, in so far as we could inquire and learn the truth.