plant shamanism

Getting to know the spirits of place

A few days ago I wrote about how the life of everything sings together to make the spirit of a place. As a druid and animist, I like to learn as much as I can about the place and the beings that give it its special spirit.

There are two kinds of knowledge. One is the kind that you can find in books and on the internet. The second is the knowledge in your bones, the knowing you arrive at by using all of your senses.

I like to combine both of these kinds of knowledge to make closer connections to the spirits that surround me.

Try this experiment.

Pick a being that lives near you. It can be a tree, a plant, or a rock – it’s good to start with something that won’t run away. Sit with it for a while, opening all your senses to it. (Only use your sense of taste if you are absolutely certain it’s not poisonous!) See what you can learn by just sharing space with this being.

Then go home and look the plant or stone up in a book or on the web. Look for its characteristics and its uses. To what extent does your intuition agree with what’s in the book?

When I try this, I am invariably surprised about how much I can learn from just being with a natural thing. It would seem that humans are quite capable of using their intuition for all kinds of things.

Why don’t you have a go and see for yourself?

Calling All Witches!

Hi!

I really, really need some witch blogs to follow. Being a baby hedgewitch myself, I prefer blogs focusing on gardening, herbalism, plants, etc. But I appreciate all kinds of witches!

Please like or reblog if you post any one of these things focusing on:

- herbalism

- gardening

- white magic

- spells

- sigils

- kitchen witchery

- hedgewitchery

- baby witch tips

- crystals

- potions

- positivism

- nature

- sea witchery

- green witchery

- meditation

- environment awareness

- healing

- taoism

- mental illness help

- tea

- candles

- animals

- zen

- tarot

- witchy art/aesthetic

ooo

I am an ally to lgbtq+ witches \(^o^)/

Much love,

Autumn

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Witch’s Hat Mushrooms Pentagram Pendant, Hand Carved in Oxidized Silver

by Moon & Serpent Etsy->

Instagram:  @  moonandserpent​

My Witchy Reading List for 2017

Books on traditional witchcraft, herbalism, trance work, modern applications, etc.

Crones Book of Charms & Spells, by Valerie Worth (2000)

Crones Book of Words, by Valerie Worth (1971)

Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic, by Emma Wilby (2005)

Early American Herb Recipes, by Alice Cooke Brown (1988)

Encyclopedia of Pyschoactive Plants: Ethnopharmacology and Its Applications, by  Christian Rätsch (1998)

Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook: A Home Manual, by James Green (2000)

The History of the Devil, by R. Lowe Thompson (1929)

How to Heal Toxic Thoughts: Simple Tools for Personal Transformation, by Sandra Ingerman (2006)

Letters from the Devil’s Forest, by Robin Artisson (2014)

Magical and Ritual Uses of Herbs, by Richard Alan Miller (1983)

Natural Magic, by Doreen Valiente (1987)

Plant Spirit Shamanism: Traditional Techniques for Healing the Soul, by  Ross Heaven, Howard G. Charing (2006)

Shamanic Journeying, by Sandra Ingerman (2003)

Singing With Blackbirds: The Survival of Primal Celtic Shamanism in Later Folk-Traditions, by  Stuart A. Harris-Logan (2006)

Veneficium: Magic, Witchcraft and the Poison Path, by Daniel A. Schulke (2012)

The Way of Wyrd: Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer, by Brian Bates (1983).

Witchcraft for Tomorrow, by Doreen Valiente (1978)

Witchcraft Medicine: Healing Arts, Shamanic Practices, and Forbidden Plants, by  Claudia Müller-Ebeling, Wolf-Dieter Storl, Christian Rätsch (1998)

hades-pa  asked:

What's Dedicate Gorse's backstory?

Gorse was a nice farm boy in Yanjing. He discovered cooking - his mom was a really good cook - and his father, who was a farmer, taught him about herbs, and his grandma taught him about cooking and healing herbs. As he got older, he got more obsessed with herbs and plants, and the village shaman taught him for a while until he said there was nothing else he could teach him. 

Then Gorse hit the road and studied as he traveled, with every shaman and witch who knew anything about plants. He studied making potions, making medicines, and cooking. He earned money cooking at inns and caravansarys. When he came to cities where he could settle for a while to study, he’d cook in eating houses. In one of those cities, he met Niko. In jail. 

He ended up in jail because he broke into a garden where the plants were placed unharmoniously and were screwing up the house. Niko was tossed in jail I think because the local mages got jealous and wanted him tossed in jail. So they broke out and began traveling together, because Niko saw Gorse’s talent. Niko taught him until they got to Winding Circle. By then, Gorse had the education to get his medallion as a mage, then after a few years as a master, and he was given charge of the kitchens. 

An exhaustive list of books for the advanced witch.

Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions: Essays in Comparative Religions by Mircea Eliade

Evolutionary Witchcraft by T. Thorn Coyle

Advanced Witchcraft: Go Deeper, Reach Further, Fly Higher by Edain McCoy

Witches, Midwives, and Nurses: A History of Women Healers by Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English

The Veil’s Edge: Exploring the Boundaries of Magic by Willow Polson

Deepening Witchcraft: Advancing Skills & Knowledge by Grey Cat

Kissing the Limitless by Thorn Coyle

The Sea Priestess by Dion Fortune

The Training & Work of an Initiate by Dion Fortune

The Second Circle: Tools for the Advancing Pagan by Venecia Rauls

The Otherside of Virtue by Brendan Myers

Psychic Self-Defense by Dion Fortune

Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World by John G. Gager

Wicca 333: Advanced Topics in Wiccan Belief by Kaatryn MacMorgan

The Elements of Ritual: Air, Fire, Water & Earth in the Wiccan Circle by Deborah Lipp

777 And Other Qabalistic Writings of Aleister Crowley: Including Gematria & Sepher Sephiroth by Aleister Crowley

Treading the Mill: Practical Craft Working in Modern Traditional Witchcraft by Nigel G. Pearson

Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson

The Call of the Horned Piper by Nigel Aldcroft Jackson

Masks of Misrule: The Horned God & His Cult in Europe by Nigel Jackson

The Pillars of Tubal Cain by Nigel Jackson

The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition by Evan John Jones

The Robert Cochrane Letters: An Insight into Modern Traditional Witchcraft by Robert Cochrane

Secrets of East Anglian Magic by Nigel Pennick

Jambalaya: The Natural Woman’s Book of Personal Charms and Practical Rituals by Luisah Teish

The Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells: The Ultimate Reference Book for the Magical Arts by Judika Illes

HEKATE: Keys to the Crossroads – A collection of personal essays, invocations, rituals, recipes and artwork from modern Witches, Priestesses and Priests by Sorita D’Este

The Satanic Witch by Anton Szandor LAVey

Advanced Wicca: Exploring Deeper Levels of Spiritual Skills and Masterful Magick by Patricia Telesco

The Meaning of Witchcraft by Gerald Brosseau Gardner

The Study of Witchcraft: A Guidebook to Advanced Wicca by Deborah Lipp

Progressive Witchcraft by Janet Farrar and Gavin Bone
*
The Crossroads in Folklore and Myth by Martin Puhvel

When the Drummers Were Women: A Spiritual History of Rhythm by Layne Redmond

The Night Battles: Witchcraft & Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries by Anne Tedeschi

A Razor for a Goat: Problems in the History of Witchcraft and Diabolism by Elliot Rose

Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches’ Sabbath by Carlo Ginzburg

Popular Religion in Late Saxon England: Elf Charms in Context by Karen Louise Jolly

The Return of the Dead: Ghosts, Ancestors, and the Transparent Veil of the Pagan Mind by Claude Lecouteux

Contemporary Paganism: Listening People, Speaking Earth by Graham Harvey

Athenian Popular Religion by Jon D. Mikalson

Greek Folk Religion by Martin P. Nilsson

Homo Necans: The Anthropology of Ancient Greek Sacrificial Ritual and Myth by Walter Burkert

The Greek Way of Death by Robert Garland

The Odyssey by Homer

The Iliad by Homer

Theogony, Works and Days by Hesiod

The Histories, Revised by Herodotus

Popular Magic: Cunning-folk in English History by Owen Davies

Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions by Hilda Roderick Ellis Davidson

The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture by Paul C. Bauschatz

Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael

Greek and Roman Necromancy by Daniel Ogden

Rotting Goddess: The Origins of the Witch in Classical Antiquity by Jacob Rabinowitz

The Silver Bough by F. Marian MacNeil

The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion by James Frazer

The White Goddess by Robert Graves

Myth and Sexuality by Jamake Highwater

The Homeric Hymns by Homer

The Wisdom of the Outlaw by Joseph Falaky Nagy

Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon

Trioedd Ynys Prydein: The Triads of the Island of Britain by Rachel Bromwich

Lady With A Mead Cup by Michael Enright

Women’s Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook by Ross Shepard Kraemer

Auraicept na n-Éces: The Scholars Primer by George Calder, ed.

A Guide to Early Irish Law by Fergus Kelly

The Tain by tr. by Thomas Kinsella

The Banshee: The Irish Death Messenger by Patricia Lysaght

Sex and Marriage in Ancient Ireland by Patrick C. Power

The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries by W. Y. Evans Wentz

The Secret Commonwealth and the Fairy Belief Complex by Brian Walsh

Beyond Celts, Germans, and Scythians by Peter S. Wells

Tales of the Elders of Ireland by Ann Dooley and Harry Roe, trans.

The Celtic Heroic Age by John T. Koch and John Carey, eds.

The Poetic Edda

The Prose Edda

Society and Politics in Snorri Sturluson’s Heimskringla by Sverre Bagge

Feud in the Icelandic Saga by Jesse L. Byock

The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies by Andrew Lang

The Way of Wyrd by Brian Bates

The Real Middle-Earth: Magic and Mystery in the Dark Ages by Brian Bates

Gods of Love and Ecstasy: The Traditions of Shiva and Dionysus by Alain Danielou

Pagan Dream Of Rennaissance by Joscelyn Godwin
*
Spiritual Mentoring: A Pagan Guide by Judy Harrow

Loneliness & Revelation by Brendan Myers

The Pagan Book of Living and Dying: Practical Rituals, Prayers, Blessings, and Meditations on Crossing Over by Starhawk

A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into Polytheism by John Michael Greer

Exploring the Pagan Path: Wisdom from the Elders by Kristin Madden, Starhawk, Raven Grimassi, and Dorothy Morrison

Between the Worlds edited by Sian Reid
*
The Gaelic Otherworld by John Gregorson Campbell, ed. by Ronald Black

The Visions of Isobel Gowdie: Magic, Shamanism and Witchcraft in Seventeenth-century Scotland by Emma Wilby

Dreamtime: Concerning the Boundary Between Wilderness and Civilization by Hans Peter Duerr

The Underworld Initiation: A journey towards psychic transformation by R. J. Stewart

Power Within the Land: The Roots of Celtic and Underworld Traditions Awakening the Sleepers and Regenerating the Earth by R. J. Stewart

The Tree of Enchantment: Ancient Wisdom and Magic Practices of the Faery Tradition by Orion Foxwood

The Woman in the Shaman’s Body: Reclaiming the Feminine in Religion and Medicine by Barbara Tedlock

Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy by Mircea Eliade

Walkers Between the Worlds: The Western Mysteries from Shaman to Magus by Caitlin Matthews

Plant Spirit Wisdom: Shamans and Sin eaters, Celtic Techniques for Healing the Soul by Ross Heaven

The Wiccan Mystic by Ben Gruagach

To Fly by Night edited by Veronica Cummer

Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism by Jenny Blain

Cunning-Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic by Emma Wilby

Sacred Mask Sacred Dance by Evan John Jones
*
Circles, Groves and Sanctuaries by Dan and Pauline Campanelli

Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic: A Materia Magica of African-American Conjure by Catherine Yronwode

Sticks, Stones, Roots & Bones: Hoodoo, Mojo & Conjuring with Herbs by Stephanie Rose Bird

Mastering Herbalism: A Practical Guide by Paul Huson

Encyclopedia of Natural Magic by John Michael Greer

The Tree of Meaning: Language, Mind and Ecology by Robert Bringhurst

Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healingby Stephen Pollington

Learning Their Language: Intuitive Communication with Animals and Nature by Marta Williams

The Meaning of Herbs: Myth, Language & Lore by G. & Field, A. Scoble

The Lost Language of Plants: The Ecological Importance of Plant Medicines to Life on Earth by Stephen Buhner

The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety by Simon Mills, Kerry Bone
*
By Standing Stone and Elder Tree: Ritual and the Unconscious by William G. Gray also known as Rollright Stone and Elder Tree

Magical Ritual Methods by William G. Gray

The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion by Mircea Eliade

Hekate Liminal Rites: A Study of the rituals, magic and symbols of the torch-bearing Triple Goddess of the Crossroads by David Rankine

Circles of Power: Ritual Magic in the Western Tradition by John Michael Greer

Watch on infectious-awareness.tumblr.com

Terrence McKenna - Shamans Among The Machines

“Nano technology is a very hot buzzword at the moment, an unimaginable dream of building machines and small objects atom by atom. Perhaps under the control of long chain polymers running forms of preprogrammed software of some sort, it’s all very razzmatazz, very state of the art, but in fact pharmaceutical chemists have been working on the nano technological realm for over a hundred years. I mean when you synthesize molecules out of simpler substrate, specifically to have a conformational geometry that matches something going on in the synapse of a primate; a human or a monkey… Or something like that you are working at this nano technological level. Both the psychedelic, and the new computational machines represent extensions of human function… It locks in with the concept of prosthesis. The drugs, the psychedelic substances, the shamanic plants are forms of prosthetic devices for extending the human mind; the human perceptual apparatus into hidden realms or inaccessible realms. Similarly the machines by allowing us to model, calculate and simulate very complicated multi-variable processes extend the power of the human mind into places it could never dream of going before. And part of what seems to me, very real about being a human being and inheriting ten thousand years of human history is the complexity of the inheritance, and the growth of that complexity. A thousand years ago an intelligent human being could actually dream of mastering the entire database of western civilization, read all the classic authors, read all the bible…. Now the notion of any single human being assimilating even a small portion of the database of this civilization is inconceivable. So machines which filter, which search, which are guided by human intent, that’s part of the story. The other parts of the story are about boundary dissolving states of ecstasy in which all the factoids of the culture are thrown up for grabs, the deck is reshuffled, synchronicity rules, and out of that steps visionary understanding, breakthrough, integrated breakthrough under the aegis of psychedelic intoxication.”

Slippery Elm

Slippery Elm is often used in spells designed to stop gossip.

 It is also given to children as a charm warn about the neck to ensure the child grows up with a persuasive tongue. 

Native to the US and Canada, this marvelous herb is a gentle and effective remedy for irritated states of the mucous membranes in the chest. This herb was used by Native Americans as a poultice (compress) for wounds, boils, ulcers, fevers, colds, and bowl complaints.  

I make an immune tincture for children, and this is one of my key ingredients. Taken regularly Slippery Elm is nutritious and soothing, it is a good food for those who suffer from digestion issues, and brings instant relief from acidity, diarrhea, and gastroenteritis. It may also bring relief to conditions such as colic, inflammation of the gut, constipation, and IBS.

At home I prefer to use Slippery Elm for coughs and bronchitis

Forms of Slippery Elm: Infusion, Poultice, Capsules, and Powder. 

Magi 336 Spoilers

Warning: As usual, please note that my level of Japanese is basic at most, and this is just a translation of text summaries available online, so I cannot guarantee that the following snippets are accurate. In other words, these can be just rumors or misinterpretations, and I might have left some parts out because I didn’t understand them. Feel free to share the link, but please DO NOT REPOST, and don’t forget to support the official releases!!

In which the nature of the trials is revealed. Raise your hand if you can hear someone yelling Saori!! or something in the background.

Keep reading

9 Common herbs for The Witch’s Cabinet


Sage-Sage is the staple of any witch stockpile. Most notable for its cleansing abilities, a bundle of dried sage produces a smell that is abhorrent to most spirits or nasty little critters that like to dwell about. Burn a little, and it will drive them out of your area. For these reasons, sage is used to cleanse and purify sacred spaces before a ritual. Sage is also believed to increase wisdom and gain guidance from a spirit.
Lavender-A wonderful herb for healing, it can be used in teas for ridding oneself of headaches. Magically speaking, it is excellent for helping to calm anxiety and stressful situations. It has often been used for aiding sleep and helping to promote prophetic dreaming. If you like to purify yourself before a ritual, sprinkle some in the bathtub and have a nice soak.
Peppermint-Perfect for settling an upset stomach, mint in most forms is a great addition to the stores. It is a good herb for protection and for gaining or attracting wealth to you. Not to mention the fairies tend to flock about when it’s grown in abundance. It’s been known to attract casual lovers.
Horehound-Excellent for a sore throat, horehound is said to be especially useful in warding against being ensorcelled. That is to say, to protect against other witches or someone casting spells against you. It may even be productive if you’ve got a particularly nasty entity that needs exorcising.
Ginger-Being a spicy herb, ginger is known for adding a punch to spells and enchantments, especially those involving sexual magic. This can mean either strengthening the spell, quickening it to fruition, or just making sure it has the desired effect.
Clove-Nobody likes malicious gossip, least of all a witch. Cloves are useful for the sake of preventing drama and diverting people from enveloping you in their lies or slander. It is especially good at protecting children from harmful teasing or bullying and can be helpful in bringing your friends closer to you.
Olive-Don’t underestimate these little things. They’ve been used in a wide variety of magic and are just as potent today as they were thousands of years ago. Olives are signs of fertility for both men and women and are thought to increase the chances of pregnancy. It is a substantial offering, especially for any workings involving a Cthonic deity and can be used for a quick topical potion mix.
Anise-A vivid strengthener in divination and omens, anise is a most wonderful addition to the cabinet. It is thought to assist in trances and meditation, as well as bringing entities to your aid in a working. Anise takes the shape of a star, an important symbol it witchcraft.
Red Clover-Often seen as a symbol of good luck, red clover is a good charm to ward off unwanted romantic advances or to ensure to loyalty of someone you love. It’s sometimes viewed as a shamanic plant, able to help one in their interactions with the Otherworld and used as a protection when traveling between. It is thought to calm the capricious nature of some entities if given as an offering.