plant shamanism

Getting to know the spirits of place

A few days ago I wrote about how the life of everything sings together to make the spirit of a place. As a druid and animist, I like to learn as much as I can about the place and the beings that give it its special spirit.

There are two kinds of knowledge. One is the kind that you can find in books and on the internet. The second is the knowledge in your bones, the knowing you arrive at by using all of your senses.

I like to combine both of these kinds of knowledge to make closer connections to the spirits that surround me.

Try this experiment.

Pick a being that lives near you. It can be a tree, a plant, or a rock – it’s good to start with something that won’t run away. Sit with it for a while, opening all your senses to it. (Only use your sense of taste if you are absolutely certain it’s not poisonous!) See what you can learn by just sharing space with this being.

Then go home and look the plant or stone up in a book or on the web. Look for its characteristics and its uses. To what extent does your intuition agree with what’s in the book?

When I try this, I am invariably surprised about how much I can learn from just being with a natural thing. It would seem that humans are quite capable of using their intuition for all kinds of things.

Why don’t you have a go and see for yourself?

Calling All Witches!

Hi!

I really, really need some witch blogs to follow. Being a baby hedgewitch myself, I prefer blogs focusing on gardening, herbalism, plants, etc. But I appreciate all kinds of witches!

Please like or reblog if you post any one of these things focusing on:

- herbalism

- gardening

- white magic

- spells

- sigils

- kitchen witchery

- hedgewitchery

- baby witch tips

- crystals

- potions

- positivism

- nature

- sea witchery

- green witchery

- meditation

- environment awareness

- healing

- taoism

- mental illness help

- tea

- candles

- animals

- zen

- tarot

- witchy art/aesthetic

ooo

I am an ally to lgbtq+ witches \(^o^)/

Much love,

Autumn

My Witchy Reading List for 2017

Books on traditional witchcraft, herbalism, trance work, modern applications, etc.

Crones Book of Charms & Spells, by Valerie Worth (2000)

Crones Book of Words, by Valerie Worth (1971)

Cunning Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic, by Emma Wilby (2005)

Early American Herb Recipes, by Alice Cooke Brown (1988)

Encyclopedia of Pyschoactive Plants: Ethnopharmacology and Its Applications, by  Christian Rätsch (1998)

Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook: A Home Manual, by James Green (2000)

The History of the Devil, by R. Lowe Thompson (1929)

How to Heal Toxic Thoughts: Simple Tools for Personal Transformation, by Sandra Ingerman (2006)

Letters from the Devil’s Forest, by Robin Artisson (2014)

Magical and Ritual Uses of Herbs, by Richard Alan Miller (1983)

Natural Magic, by Doreen Valiente (1987)

Plant Spirit Shamanism: Traditional Techniques for Healing the Soul, by  Ross Heaven, Howard G. Charing (2006)

Shamanic Journeying, by Sandra Ingerman (2003)

Singing With Blackbirds: The Survival of Primal Celtic Shamanism in Later Folk-Traditions, by  Stuart A. Harris-Logan (2006)

Veneficium: Magic, Witchcraft and the Poison Path, by Daniel A. Schulke (2012)

The Way of Wyrd: Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer, by Brian Bates (1983).

Witchcraft for Tomorrow, by Doreen Valiente (1978)

Witchcraft Medicine: Healing Arts, Shamanic Practices, and Forbidden Plants, by  Claudia Müller-Ebeling, Wolf-Dieter Storl, Christian Rätsch (1998)

BASIL.
Masculine in nature, often associated with the planet Mars and the element of fire. Can be used in spells to attract luck, money, and love. Keep a living basil plant in your home to ward against negative energy. Basil can also be used medicinally as a mild sedative to help treat anxiety and tension headaches.

-Mr. MoonRose

hades-pa  asked:

What's Dedicate Gorse's backstory?

Gorse was a nice farm boy in Yanjing. He discovered cooking - his mom was a really good cook - and his father, who was a farmer, taught him about herbs, and his grandma taught him about cooking and healing herbs. As he got older, he got more obsessed with herbs and plants, and the village shaman taught him for a while until he said there was nothing else he could teach him. 

Then Gorse hit the road and studied as he traveled, with every shaman and witch who knew anything about plants. He studied making potions, making medicines, and cooking. He earned money cooking at inns and caravansarys. When he came to cities where he could settle for a while to study, he’d cook in eating houses. In one of those cities, he met Niko. In jail. 

He ended up in jail because he broke into a garden where the plants were placed unharmoniously and were screwing up the house. Niko was tossed in jail I think because the local mages got jealous and wanted him tossed in jail. So they broke out and began traveling together, because Niko saw Gorse’s talent. Niko taught him until they got to Winding Circle. By then, Gorse had the education to get his medallion as a mage, then after a few years as a master, and he was given charge of the kitchens.