pit bull breed

*Takes Deep Breath*

my dog is NOT a pitbull, pit bull is not a blanket term for all bully breeds, there is one breed called a pit bull and that’s the American Pit Bull Terrier, They ARE majority dog aggressive, most bully mixes do have it in their genetics to be dog aggressive, you can not ‘train’ out aggression, you can only manage and train to reduce it, it really doesn’t matter if you ‘raise them right’ its in their genetics, you can’t train herding out of a herding dog, If you have what you think is a 'pit bull’ mix say bully mix instead, it covers all the bully breeds and doesnt add to breed confusion and screw up bite statistics.

*falls to the floor*

anonymous asked:

Colombia approved a new law about "dangerous breeds", now everyone who have this kind of dogs have to have a special a registration and paid for permit to keep the dog, because of this many dogs end up being abandoned and being sacrificed! My best friend has a pit bull and she is the most adorable dog on earth! how can we prove that this breed are not really dangerous!

Well, my anonymous friend, firstly I can’t figure out whether you’re talking about Colombia the country, the county or a city, so I can’t look up your legislation.

Secondly, registering dogs isn’t in and of itself a bad thing. You might be disappointed that I’m not going to tell you what you wanted to hear.

How bad this new law is, and whether or not it’s fair, depends on the details, which I can’t find.

Where I am we have a general registration for ALL dogs. It’s a cheap annual fee if they’re desexed and if the dog gets loose and is picked up, it gets returned to the owners first time free of charge. That law is there to ensure the dog population doesn’t get out of control in suburbia, and that dogs that repeatedly escape and get onto the road can be identified and addressed.

Certain ‘restricted’ breeds have additional laws. They are supposed to only be kept if desexed if living in certain suburbs. They can only be owned by someone over the age of 18. They can only be walked in public by someone who is over 18. There is a minimum height for your fences. This legislation targets certain breeds, including the pit bull. While I don’t think it’s fair to target a particular handful of breeds, I do think these precautions are reasonable for any dog breed over 20kg.

If any dog attacks a human, or kills an animal, or comes close, it gets reclassified as a ‘dangerous dog’. These dogs must have an enclosure, not just a fence, and ‘Beware of Dog’ signs at the entrance to the property. They’re not to be walked in public, and are to be muzzled if outside of their enclosure. These dogs attract a higher registration fee, and if they escape they are likely to be seized and put down.

The difference between a ‘restricted breed’ legislation and this dangerous dog legislation is that these individual dogs have proven themselves to be dangerous. It is not condemning an entire breed. These measures have not resulted in more dogs being ‘abandoned and sacrificed‘, but there are more dogs around these days that look very much like pit bulls that are being labeled as ‘staffy crosses’.

All dogs bite. That’s how they eat. You can’t guarantee that any individual dog, of any breed, will never hurt a human. You simply can’t, and it’s irresponsible to do so.

We should be encouraging people to understand dog’s body language and dog etiquette to reduce the number of dog bites. Legislation won’t fix this problem, but neither will targeting certain breeds.

You can’t prove that ‘pit bulls are not really dangerous’. You can’t prove that for any breed, especially not a large, muscular one. The task lies in convincing the general public that the breed is not any more dangerous than any other breed of dog. Hey, it’s Labradors and Golden Retrievers that are statistically most likely to bite a vet and send them to hospital.

Originally posted by humoristics

Having good ambassadors for the breed in public and social media is vital to change public perception. Stop cropping their ears if you’re in a country that still allows this to happen. Socialize them well, with humans and other dogs. Train them well. Let them be as good as they can be, because they represent their breed.

Not all of these dogs are nice, but that could be said of any breed. The task remains to show that enough of these dogs are and don’t deserve to be singled out over any other breed.

It used to be rottweilers, dobermans and german shepherds that were vilified in this way. Society’s views can change, but it takes consistent good examples to do so.

anonymous asked:

I always thought that "pit bull" wasn't technically a breed- just a conglomeration of Staffies and bully-type dogs. How come things like "pure breed pit bull" are so common now?

The American Pit Bull Terrier (APBT) is a breed of dog. Depending on their sex, they can range anywhere between 30-60 pounds. They are lean, muscular doggos.

The term “Pit Bull” was initially used in the 19th century to describe American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, American Bulldogs, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers - i.e; Bulldog/Terrier mixes used for baiting, fighting, and hunting. 

In today’s world where we treat these dogs strictly as pets, the term “Pit Bull” should really be phased out. It is very uncommon for one to find an actual purebred APBT in a shelter, but instead of being labeled a bully breed mix, they are just labeled “Pit Bulls.” 

Why does it matter? Well, unfortunately people’s classification of Pit Bulls has crept into more than just those 4 breeds. Now people believe that any block headed dog is a Pit Bull! This is damaging to many dogs that are either in shelters that euthanize Pits, or in cities that ban them. The widespread notion that stocky looking dogs are Pit Bulls is not limited to dog fanciers, this common ideology is shared by officials that make the ignorant decision to euthanize these dogs.

For example, only one of these dogs is an APBT, but most of these dogs are mistaken, and euthanized, as Pit Bulls:

Bully breeds are tough to handle. They are loveable dogs, but IMO they require an experienced owner. Since they are so readily available in shelters, and the push for everyone to rescue them is so strong, they often end up in the hands of owners looking for beginner, or easy breeds, which attributes to the higher incidence of “Pit Bull” related attacks. You can read more on why that is, here.

flickr

Dexter, American Pit Bull Terrier by Petra B.
Via Flickr:
17. Jänner 2010

This dog is so punk rock omfg I love it

Friends I need some help!!!

Castle Rock (my city) is considering lifting the BSL and are basically gathering people’s opinions this week, and so I’m going to write a letter to the city council about why they should lift it. Soooo… if you have any sources on why BSL is unnecessary/ineffective then pleeease send me some! I would love to help with lifting it in at least my little town. And please share/reblog to get this around to as many people as possible. Thanks everyone!

Tagging some popular blogs: @apbt @pulldogs @pawsitivelypowerful @pantsthepuppy @bigpointyears @salty-sighthound @dogsbecausedogs @noodle-dragon @quichehound @why-animals-do-the-thing @spartathesheltie @spanishmal @6woofs

Thank you SO much for anyone that has any advice/info or shares this, I appreciate it so much!

So people wanted to see Mace stacked. I’ve never stacked a dog before. Mace has never been stacked before. This is our attempt. It’s not very good because the camera isn’t completely level with her so her tuck isn’t shown as well. I tried y'all.

Mace, female
2nd generation Bull Lurcher (APBT x Whippet)
Height: ~19"
Catch dog, coon hunting, deer hunting, hare coursing
Grand-daughter of a former pit dog on sire’s side. She is too DA for breeding purposes and has been spayed. Grand sire has been removed from breeding program. His DA outweighs the benefits of his gameness and intelligence.
The breeding that took place to get this dog will not be repeated. She possesses most of the desired qualities for the breeding program, but has a tendency to pick fights with other catch dogs in the field. She is also too bull-ish in body for my tastes. We generally aim for the many benefits of the sighthound and this was our first attempt at putting more APBT than Whippet into a line. We will most likely not attempt this again. Learn and move forward, as the saying goes.
That aside, she is an excellent lone hunting dog and gains easy on the hare. A joy to work with and very intelligent. Phenomenal prey drive.