pinkwash this

anonymous asked:

Do you think that anti-Semitism and anti-zionism are synonymous? I didn't think so, but many have said that they are, which doesn't make sense since zionism is separate from the religion and ethnicity and culture (but maybe this is wrong because I'm reading non-Jewish people's viewpoints and it's a way for them to be antisemitic while being edgy)

While anti-zionism isn’t technically the same thing as antisemitism, the line between “Jews don’t have a right to a safe homeland” and “I hate Jews” is awfully precarious. Few can walk it with care and far fewer even bother to try. Anti-zionists are prone to treating accusations of antisemitism as more offensive than actual antisemitism.

Anti-zionists will often use the idea that anti-zionism isn’t anti-semitism to defend antisemitic actions. Just a few things I’ve seen defended as “just anti-zionist.”

- Spreading Rothschild Jewish Banking Conspiracies
- Accusing Holocaust Survivors of controlling the US Government
- Blaming Israel for 9/11
- Denying Jewish History 
- Denying Jewish genetics
- Derailing any conversation of antisemitism by injecting Israel/Palestine into the debate
- Spreading Khazar theories
- Policing how Jews talk about our own history and experiences
- Dictating to different groups of Jews how they should feel about other Jews
- Silencing Israeli Jews on college campuses even if they are there to criticize Israeli Policy
- Treating LGBTQIA Israeli Jews as if their very existence was the same thing as “pinkwashing” Hasbara
- Comparing Jews with Nazis
- Downplaying the severity of the Holocaust
- Acting like the Holocaust was the beginning and end of antisemitism
- Denying that Israeli Jews are Majority non-Ashkenazi and that they are there because of oppression and expulsion by MENA countries.
- Talking over said Jews about how they should feel about Israel
- Dismissing antisemitism against white and/or Ashkenazi Jews 
- Defending and promoting antisemitic figures in the “Pro-Palestine” movement like Holocaust Denier Paul Eisen and Blood Libelist Alison Weir
- Tokenizing Jews most other Jews find reprehensible like the Neturei Karta and Gilad Atzmon so they can prove they aren’t antisemitic
- Dividing Jews into “good Jews” and “bad Jews” based on our opinion on Zionism (which is probably far more nuanced and informed than theirs) and not caring about anything else we think or feel.
- Telling Jewish victims of antisemitism that they should blame Israel instead of the perpetrators
- Blaming Israel for ISIS/ISIL/Daesh
- Ignoring or denying the plights of Jewish refugees
- Ignoring Jewish voices when it comes to our own history and experience of antisemitism
- Cheering and/or justifying the deaths of Israeli civilians
- Boycotting Israel and only Israel despite countries like Russia, China, Pakistan, Turkey and others committing the same sins, frequently on much larger scales
- Demonizing Jews for being activists on anything other than Israel/Palestine
- Telling Jews what is and isn’t antisemitic
- Trying to excuse their own antisemitism by deflecting the question with the etymology of “semite” - Chaim’s Law
- Telling MENA Jews they have no right to their own cultures
- Telling Latinx Jews they have no right to their own culture
- Identity Policing Jews
- Acting like there’s no difference between Jewish refugees from murderous antisemitism and colonial conquerors who came to exploit the local population and resources for a foreign mother country


I could go on.

My point is there’s a reason most Jews I know, even anti-zionist Jews have a severe distrust of non-Jewish anti-zionists and much of it has to do with the points above and so many more. This goes triple for any anti-zionist who isn’t Palestinian. Unlike Palestinians, there’s a good chance their country expelled, oppressed or murdered their Jewish populations, necessitating Zionism in the first place. The fact of the matter is most Israeli Jews are survivors of genocide, oppression and expulsion who went to the one place in the world that would take them in. You can’t treat that last point as a hypothetical. They went to Israel because they wanted to live. They are frequently damned for making that choice by the very people who gave them no other choice. That’s just cruelty. It demonstrates a callous indifference to Jewish life and suffering, and if many Jews consider that to be antisemitic, do you really think you can blame them?

Anti-zionists need to change their tactics and their associations in a major and visible way if they want to avoid accusations of antisemitism from a majority of Jews. And that’s on them, not us. 

Here are some LGBT movies I’ve watched !!

Top picks (in alphabetical order)

Big Eden (2000)
Gay artist Henry moves from NYC to small hometown to take care of sick grandfather. A really sweet, heartwarming story. Bonus points for no homophobia (!!) plot line & a gay native american man, Pike, who is adorable and crushes on Henry.

Brokeback Mountain (2005)
Who hasn’t seen this? Two shepherds and their tumultuous love story over the years. 

But I’m a Cheerleader (1999)
Girl gets sent to a boot camp meant to alter her sexuality. Funny and aesthetic and really cheesy but worth the watch.

Carol (2015)
A young woman in her 20s, Therese Belivet is a clerk working in a Manhattan department store and dreaming of a more fulfilling life when she meets Carol, an alluring woman trapped in a loveless, convenient marriage. 

First Girl I Loved (2016)
Girl falls in love with the most popular girl from her school. Bonus points for a nuanced and realistic portrayal of teenagers.

The Way He Looks (Hoje Eu Quero Voltar Sozinho, 2014)
Brazilian coming-of-age drama about a blind boy who falls in love with his classmate. Based on a short film called “I don’t want to go back alone”, which you can find on youtube.

Holding The Man (2015)
In the 1970s, two teen boys in Australia fight all obstacles thrown their way and refuse to renounce the love they feel for each other. Based on Australia’s “most famous gay biography”.

I Killed My Mother (J’ai Tué Ma Mère, 2009) 
Biographical drama. Directorial debut of Quebecois actor Xavier Dolan, which he also wrote, produced and starred in. My favourite film by him.

Kill Your Darlings (2013)
Biographical drama/thriller. A murder in 1944 draws together the great poets of the beat generation. Peep Daniel Radcliffe and Dane DeHaan.

Laurence Anyways (2012)
A drama that charts ten years in the relationship of a transgender woman’s relationship with her lover. Directed by Xavier Dolan.

Maurice (1987)
The story of a gay man in the early 20th century. A really sweet film with bonus points for being a gay period drama that - spoilers - has a happy ending.

Moonlight (2016) (see title card)
A chronicle of the childhood, adolescence and burgeoning adulthood of a young black man growing up in a rough neighborhood of Miami. First lgbt film (and film with all-black cast) to win Best Picture at the Academy Awards 2017.

Pride (2014)
U.K. gay activists work to help miners during their lengthy strike of the National Union of Mineworkers in the summer of 1984. A truly feel-good movie every one should watch.

The Handmaiden (2016)
A woman is hired as a handmaiden to a Japanese heiress, but secretly she is involved in a plot to defraud her. It’s been called a “South Korean Gothic Lesbian Revenge Thriller”. Just watch it. Trust me. 

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)
A cult-classic and must-watch. Need I say more?


Rest of movies in alphabetical order under cut, with some commentary by yrs truly (me. a gay.)

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

do u know any lgbt arab movies u can recommend ?

This list is of queer middle eastern films that include queer arab films

Circumstance (2011) - film explores love and sexual rebellion between two women under the watchful eye of the government and through family dynamics in modern day Iran.

Caramel (2007) - “a beauty salon in Beirut is a safe haven for five women in this Lebanese romantic comedy. Follows the love lives of five Lebanese women, one of them is the stylist Rima who does not know how to handle her attraction to a female client.

Mondial 2010 (2014) - “is a film on love and place. A Lebanese gay couple decides to take a road trip to Ramallah. The film is recorded with their camera as they chronicle their journey. The viewers are invited through the couple’s conversations into the universe of a fading city.” In reality Lebanese cannot drive to Ramallah as they are forbidden into Israel and this plays with the significance of a same-sex relationship in the Middle East and what it means to be a queer Middle Eastern.

Lola and Billy the Kid (1999) - “Murat, the youngest son of a conservative Turkish family, is struggling with his sexuality as well as with the demands of his patriarchal older brother. When Murat meets with Lola – his estranged brother who now is a drag queen – and her macho Turkish lover, Billy the Kid, he finds himself drawn into a dangerous new world. 

Oriented (2015) - feature documentary that follows the lives of three gay Palestinian friends confronting their national and sexual identity in Tel Aviv.

Fifi Howls From Happiness (2014) - “I will tell you my life story so that no idiot will write my biography the way it suits them,” says legendary gay Iranian artist Bahman Mohassess in this documentary about his life. 

A Jihad For Love (2007) - feature documentary to explore the complex global intersections between Islam and homosexuality. This movie focuses on Islam in multiple regions of the world rather than just the Middle East.

Mixed Kebab (2012) - centers around a TurkisH character and talks about the struggles of being a gay poc in a conservative Muslim household in a western country and having to defy middle eastern expectations of you. Best of all, the ending is a happy one!

I Say Dust (2015) - “Two Arab-American women in New York City fall in love, argue home and identity, engage in a chess battle, and express themselves through the power of the spoken word. 'I Say Dust’ explores poetry in cinema through the story of Hal, a poet belonging to the Palestinian diaspora in NYC, who meets Moun, a free-spirited chess boards sales girl. Their brief love affair challenges their understanding of what makes home.”

Note: There are more LGBT films produced and directed by Israelis but I don’t recommend them. They pinkwash Israel’s violent acts towards Palestinians by diverting your attention and targeting the queer audience, in specific, to claims that Israel supports LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer) rights. 

The films usually depict a Palestinian struggling with their sexuality and their community’s rejection of their identity and a “free” Israeli that fall in love and Tel Aviv is the safe haven for their love. Basically using representation that Arabs are savage and Israelis are here to free us. 

Truth is there is no rainbow bedazzled hole in the Israeli West Bank Wall that allows you a free access to ‘freedom’ if your ass is queer. When they bomb Gaza they are bombing Palestinian including queers one. Besides the fact that they are killing us, this just shows their LGBTQ rights  (all their human rights) are just a show to divert your attention and this is effectively done through media including movies. This is why I do not recommend Israeli queer films depicting the Middle East.

This sign was placed on the edge of the main stage at Outside the Frame: Queers for Palestine Film Festival in San Francisco 

La manière dont Marine Le Pen met des gays en tête du FN pour faire croire aux électeurs qu’elle n’est pas homophobe est absolument honteuse.

Je vous rappelle que le FN veut abroger la loi Taubira s’ils accèdent au pouvoir et que leur tentative de faire semblant d’être gay-friendly n’est que du pinkwashing. 

Ne vous trompez pas dans l’isoloir. 

When you say “Cancel Israeli Pinkwashing” I can only see that as two things

  • Either you mean you want Israel to not be as LGBTQ friendly as they are because it’s inconvenient to your demonization of Israel.
  • Or you mean that you want Israel to stop existing alltogether, and be replaced by a Muslim Palestine that will most likely pull back on all LGBTQ rights Israel had.

So either way you’re both anti-semitic and Anti-LGBTQ rights for Israelis.

If you have some other explanation to “cancel pinkwashing” that doesn’t make you sound like an absolute monster, please, be my guest.

anonymous asked:

Hey, I am a gay girl born into a Muslim family. The only time I was ever "religious" was as a kid when I was first learning about Islam. Growing up, I went through a lot and started losing faith. Now I feel like I cannot go back to the religion even if I wanted to because of my sexuality. I will never be accepted. I also feel like Islam prioritizes men and as a feminist that goes against what I believe in. Is there still room for me in this religion or should I start searching for another faith?

Hey so I crowdsourced a lot of this answer: [updating as I get more suggestions and resources]

Personally, I couldn’t be a Muslim and follow Islam if I didn’t find it feminist, full of social justice and intersectional. Unfortunately patriarchy and self interest tries to pass itself off as moralistic and religious —this is universal. Also it’s helpful to keep in mind that if any authority tries to tell you to hate and discriminate know that it isn’t from God or any moral compass—but fear. 

O you who have attained to faith! Be ever steadfast in upholding equity, bearing witness to the truth for the sake of God, even though it be against your own selves or your parents and kinsfolk. Whether the person concerned be rich or poor, God’s claim takes precedence over [the claims of] either of them. Do not, then, follow your own desires, lest you swerve from justice: for if you distort [the truth], behold, God is indeed aware of all that you do!

- The Holy Qur’an [4:135]

I believe the Prophet Muhammad [saw] was a radical-feminist-environmental anti-racist community organizer, activist and freedom fighter that believed in freeing people from the status quo and freeing them from oppression through Islam and Allah [swt]. And I believe in following that tradition.

“Truly, God does not change the condition of a people until they change what is in themselves.” (Quran 13:11)

———————————————————————————

About Lot/Lut:

Omar Pitras Waqar is working on a mechanical translation of the Qur’an without the diacriticals/vowels [which were added years after Muhammad’s death and during Uthman’s reign] says:

“…possibilities of this being reference to djinn/human interbreeding… or that it may have had to do with getting DNA, from angles/extraterrestrials which is still vile in a non consensual sense. Quran says the “sin” was something no creature had done before in all of the worlds (plural) so that rules out homosexual and gender variance which can be easily observed on earth in plants and animals let alone any number of beings from other planets or dimensions.”

More to support this: "Indeed, homosexuality was outside the mainstream of early rabbinic thought. It wasn’t until the New Testament and Palestinian reinterpretation of Genesis 19 that it became a significant theme. Some scholars explain this shift by citing intervening events. One was the apocryphal Book of Jubilees. In this book, it was alleged that the Sodomites had created a race of giants by having sexual relations with a group of gods, the “Watchers,” who lusted after mortal women. For this, the Sodomites were punished. The notion of “crime against nature” is a vestigial remnant of this legend, but also has scriptural roots.“ [from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/georgette-bennett-phd/sodom-and-gomorrah-revisited_b_2624684.html] Our Ethiopian Christian family has been maintaining this and other apocryphal texts many of which are repeated in the Quran like the story of Jesus turning clay birds into real living birds.

I am going to give an example of how much diacriticals/vowels make a difference.

1. From Quran.com
Surat Ash-Shu'ara [verse 165 - “Do you approach males among the worlds.“

2. Notice: “Worlds” possibly referring that’s some unseen/alien/jinn

3. Also the arabic word used for “males” could also be translated into “mates” or “rods”

4. “Do you approach mates among the worlds.” or “Do you approach rods among the worlds.” are possible translations

———————————————————————————-

I believe it was Aisha [ra] that had a close friend that was a hijra and didn’t wear a hijab, or covering around them. There was plenty of queer people in and around the Prophet Muhammad’s [s] life time.

I could name-drop Sufi saints [ahem, Rumi loved a man Shams] and poets from various times and places who violated norms of gender and sexuality on one level or another. Ali ibn Hamzah al-Asadi, more widely known as al-Kisa’i al-Kufi (d.804). As the transmitter of one of the Qur’an’s seven harfs (“readings”) in Sunni tradition, he’s an immeasurably important figure in the history of the Qur’an as a text. As such, his knowledge and character were both under close examination. In one assessment, al-Marzubani, speaking on the authority Ibn al-Arabi (the jurist, not the mystic), described al-Kisa’i as “one of the most learned persons” while adding that al-Kisa’i openly confessed to engaging in acts that included same-sex relations. “Yet,” he adds, al-Kisa’i remained “an accurate reader, knowledgeable in the Arabic language, and honest.” 

This does not answer all questions, but it offers something. In Sunni Islam, there are seven canonical ways of reading the Qur’an. Al-Kisa’i al-Kufi is the man who gave us one of them. He devoted his life to knowing and teaching the Qur’an. It should go without saying that al-Kisa’i al-Kufi memorized the entire scripture by heart and recited it every day of his life. Along the way, he apparently fucked dudes. The lips that he used to recite divine scripture also touched men.

““O people, we created you all from a male and female
And made you into different communities and different tribes
So that you should come to know one another
Acknowledging that the most noble among you 
Is the one most aware of God
Qur’an 49:13


The most noble is the one most aware of God. This is not just incitement for all Muslims to increase their awareness of God – it is also a warning to pursue a policy of social tolerance. The implication of this verse is that no Muslim is better than another because of any of the social categories that we use to classify ourselves, such as race, ethnicity, economic class, or gender. Or even sexual orientation. A gay or lesbian Muslim is no less than a heterosexual Muslim, except by the intangible criterion of pious awareness of God (taqwa). A transgender

Muslim is no less than other Muslims who have not struggled with their own gender identity and faced the stigma of changing gender classification, except by awareness of God. 

Most Muslims cherish reciting this verse to oppose the evils of racial superiority, ethnic chauvinism, and class arrogance. Yet some see this verse as a call to justice that rings far beyond its terse words.”
— Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle, HOMOSEXUALITY IN ISLAM

El-Farouk Khaki, the founder of Salaam [a queer Muslim organization in Canada] says:  you can connect her w me, or with Daayiee Abdullah. my email is elfin925@rogers.com she can also join https://www.facebook.com/groups/99769188589/  el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque & learn that there is no singular, monolith Islam, and that for some, Islam is liberationary.

EFK and the rest of the leaders at el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque page make a point of emphasising the spiritual aspects of Islam and reducing focus on external elements. el-Tawhid Juma Circle: Toronto Unity Mosque group - wholly affirming and inclusive, with a focus on the spiritual and not so much the ritual.

Imam Daayiee Abdullah contact [the gay Imam in DC] (daayiee@aol.com). 

There’s also an Imam in Canada, TO who I know is pro-feminist, cool with gay Muslims and he asked me to give you his number if you would like it.

Some points

1) If you believe that God created you the way are, you can’t possible believe that God would reject you 2) The community you grew up in does not necessarily represent Islam 3) The beauty of Islam is that there is no intercession between you and God. You has every right and ability to pick up the Quran and find out what it means to you.  4) If you find things you can’t reconcile, you should speak to others who have found themselves in a similar situation. 5) 

thefatalfeminist.com

is a great starting point and introduction to feminism, Islam and social justice. 6) Islam does not prioritize men over women, the patriarchal actualization of Islam as seen through socially constructed norms prioritizes men over women, but that is a product of kyriarchy more than anything. If you want your faith to prioritize women, then do it.  7) Hit up Scott Kugle at Emory who could give you some nice readings and independent studies for Lesbianism or Queer identities and Islam. 

 From strawberreli [amazing Queer Muslim] !! http://strawberreli.tumblr.com/post/30642167690/queer-muslim-masterpost

queer muslim masterpost

This post pretty much came about because I was asked if I had resources for Muslims who were discovering or newly coming to terms with their sexuality. I didn’t, and the poor advice I had to offer was … poor. So, I pulled up a few of the blogs I followed that are targeted towards queer Muslims, and put together this little post for you!
Last updated: 06.14.16 (outdated info italicised)

Queer Muslim Blogs:

  • QueerMuslims
  • IamNotHaraam
  • Ace-Muslim
  • Trans Muslims
  • Ahwaa: An open space to debate LGBTQ-related issues in the Middle East
  • AllahMademeQueer
  • ComingOutMuslim
  • YouKnow-You'reaQueermuslim-When
  • InQueeries channel with Yusef Woof (contact inqueeriesshow@gmail.com)
  • Salaam Canada
  • TheBisexualBangladeshi
  • Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate facebook group
  • Queer Palestinian Empowerment Network (QPEN) facebook page
  • Queer Muslims of Boston facebook page
  • Totally Radical Muslim Zine

Queer Muslim 101:

  • A quick gender/sexuality 101 (An in-depth gender/sexuality/identity 201)
  • But what does a queer Muslim even look like? (hint: they look like people)
  • Defining homonationalism and pinkwashing. [A little bit more on pinkwashing.]
  • PDF:Homosexuality In Islam, by Scott Siraj al-Haqq Kugle (Intro + 1st Chap) Buy your own copy!
  • A good read-along-with the above book, Desiring Arabs by Joseph Massad and an online article here.
  • PDF:Muslim LGBT Inclusion Project, by Intersections International
  • More reading (a list w.some repeats): [x]
  • Why Safe Spaces are Important [looking for a replacement link]
  • “I’m confused about my sexuality.”
  • “I need proof from Qur'an and Sunnah that I’m not Haraam.”
  • “What about the Qur'an and Hadith that chastise LGBTQ Muslims?”
  • “You cherry pick your hadith!/You cherry pick from your religion!”
  • Some hadiths can be read in different ways, so it’s best to look at the outcome.
  • “Islam and LGBT are not mutually exclusive.”
  • “But I was taught Islam was the most heterosexist religion.“  [tw: continuously moving background at the link]
  • ”But all Muslims are homophobic!“ (spoiler alert: you’re wrong.)
  • ”But Muslims hate sex - it’s ~dirty~ to them!“ (I would recommend this class for basic 101 on marriage and love [sex] in Islam. Take it with Basyouni.) (See also: x and x)
  • ”Love the sinner, hate the sin, and why that’s bullshit.“
  • ”Should I come out?“ (spoiler alert: that’s up to you!)
  • ”Is there a place for LGBTQ Muslims?“ (Or ”There’s no place for LGBTQ Muslims/no organisations/no hope.“)
  • ”Will LGBTQ Muslims go to hell?“ (spoiler alert: I’m not God, how would I know?)
  • ”But it’s unnatural!“ (lolk)
  • ”There aren’t any gay Imams or Sheikhs, so you’re just making things up!“ (Also here.) (And here.)
  • “But scholars don’t condone it!”
  • ”But no fatwa was made!“ (It’s Wahabi.)
  • Egyptian fatwa
  • Indonesian fatwa [link broken, seeking replacement]
  • A post about other Sheikhs’ opinions.
  • ”But there are no inclusive mosques for LGBT Muslims!“ (Just stop. x)
  • There is no place for homophobia in Islam.
  • Let’s repeat that: There is no place for homophobia in Islam.
  • Ayahs that talk about Prophet Lut.
  • A closer reading of ayahs re: homosexuality (prev here).
  • See also: You decide how you interpret your religion.
  • Homosexuality in Sharia
  • Homosexuality in Predominately Muslim Countries (and some more on homosexuality inPakistan)
  • Pride Parade in Bangladesh (Please remember “hijra” is a slur depending on where in South Asia a person is from – please ask before using it as a catchall!)
  • Predominately Muslim Countries who are taking steps toward equality. [x] [x, x] [x] [x] [x]
  • Same-sex marriage
  • MASGD Statement on SCOTUS Marriage Equality Ruling
  • Queer Muslim Cinema: Azizah, Illuminations, Coming Out Muslim, A Jihad For Love, I Exist, Al-Nisa [BONUS: Show Al-Nisa and Red Summer (the producer) some love!], Circumstance, Naz + Maalik, Gay Muslims (a documentary produced by Channel 4 in the U.K), City of Borders, The Bubble, Out in the Dark (Palestinian and Israeli fall in love. facebook page), Facing Mirrors (2011; ft. an FtM Iranian), I Accept Me! (2011), Hir Poem, My Child. Sexualities and Queer Imaginaries. Oriented. [Article about Oriented, A Gay Girl in Damascus, and A Sinner in Mecca] [Muslim Drag Queens][Color of Water is trying to get funded]
  • Queer Muslim Music: Tum Hi Ho (by a drag artist in Lahore).
  • Queer Muslim Literature: [x] [x] [Four Gay Arabs Break the Silence] [Embracing Ramadhan in the LGBT Muslim Community] [Gaylaxy magazine] [Queer Beirut] [Sex and Desperate Hearts] [Bareed Mista3jil] [Totally Radical Muslims Zine] [5 Queer Magazines] [Not Your Tragic Queer Muslim Story/How to De-Queer Your Apartment] [Brown and Queer in America] [Queer South Asians and the Politics of Family] [A Thing of the West] [Coming Out in the Muslim Community] [Queer and Muslim At the Same Time] [9 articles on being LGBTQ in MENA] [Queering the Middle East] [Seeking Home: The Lives of Gay and Transgender Asylum Seekers of the Middle East] [Trans Muslim Honours His Faith] [Under the Gay Skin of Tehran] [Syrian and Iraqi Members of the LGBT Community Find Safe Haven in Istanbul] [Queer and Muslim] [On Community Spaces and Being A Trans Muslim] [‘Yousef and Farhad’ has been crafted by Algerian-American political cartoonist, Khalil Bendib, and Iranian-American author, Amir Soltani.] [Artist Mohammed Fayaz Draws Queer Muslims of Colour] [Xukia]
  • Desi LGBTQ Hotline
  • Queer Pakistan LGBTQ Voice and Support Group [and here is a news article]
  • Resources

A good thing to remember is to avoid the self-hatred phase, if you can. Focus on loving yourself, and realising that Allah made you just the way you are, and that you are loved, and that none of this is permanent. If this phase is unavoidable, here are some helpful sites:

  • Help! I’m losing my Islam
  • Counseling and Prevention Resources
  • Feeling suicidal?
  • Suicide prevention
  • Supporting someone who self-harms
  • Suicide and Crisis Hotlines
  • Online Crisis Network (for those with anxiety which prevents them from talking on the phone)
  • Online Chat (Arabic) for Queer Arabs

If you are a student and would like to get Faisal Alam to speak at your uni, or to see if he is coming to your uni soon, click here.

If you would like to attend Faisal Alam’s Retreat for Queer Muslims and their partners, here is more info.

If you would like to book Irshad Manji for an event click here.

If you are a PoC LGBTQ identified Muslim, QWOC is looking for submissions.

If you are from Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, or India and want to share your experiences (anonymously), please click here.

If you are South Asian and queer, consider submitting to Dayaar-e-Yaar! And if you are South Asian, queer, and between 18-25, consider attending this SoCal retreat (deadline for 2015 registration is Dec. 8th, 2014).

If you are a young activist, an independent researcher, a graduate student, or a fresh graduate, consider submitting a paper to the second issue of Kohl,  a journal for body and gender in the MENA region that wishes to explore the ways in which the erotic has been used as a means of economic and political exploitation in the MENA, within the region and outside it. Deadline to submit is Aug 2, 2015.

If you can spare some funds, help navigatethestream, a queer Muslim, become an Imam to help the Muslim LGBT community!

Lastly, here is a link if you are NOT a queer Muslim, but want to be a good ALLY! (And here is another on how NOT to be a saviour!) (And here is another on how to support a queer Muslim you happen to be dating!)

Muslim-Queer-Friendly Blogs:

(

If you’d like to be added to or taken off this list, please

send me an ask

.

)

  • occupidemuslim
  • hijabandboijeans
  • khalvatdaranjuman
  • navigatethestream
  • life-via-fo-eyes
  • living-in-technicolor
  • misandryad
  • mizjtoz
  • thalamtnafsee
  • alscientist
  • shootmethenleave
  • dyemelikeasunset
  • faineemae
  • seppin
  • gschwarzkopf
  • sllw
  • linzthenerd
  • vaginashavefeelingstoo
  • anartinsorcery
  • treatquestion
  • themadmanwithapen
  • ancientrune
  • sura93
  • insecurity-killed-the-cat
  • thehakawati
  • qalbesaleem
  • the-best-medicine
  • thesoundofthelifeofthemind
  • findingmotherland
  • shegufta
  • agileduck
  • zahhaked
  • megavelraptor
  • eibmorb
  • maesio
  • pyar-kiya-to-darna-kiya
  • postmodernveil
  • kuroenigma
  • safawi
  • casketofpearls
  • theyhelitsian
  • nofasciststate
  • chirikli
  • cokehabitsdiehard
  • decimaldot
  • madeast
  • lesbehalaaal
  • 4th-world
  • themindislimitless
  • brassmanticore
  • humjinsiyat
  • Freedom2Be
  • i-dare-to-dream
  • babyairnymph
  • twelvewhispersandbooks
  • whatamievensaying
  • whimslcott
  • haramdaddy
  • hiraethghost
  • larriefthalsey
  • t-pizzazz-a
  • young-flowerchild
  • zhangyixings
  • hairyjamespottery

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More papers/books not previously mentioned: 

BEYOND BINARY BARZAKHS: USING THE THEME OF LIMINALITY IN ISLAMIC THOUGHT TO QUESTION THE GENDER BINARY by Sara Haq Hussaini

The Quilt & Other Stories [translated from Urdu]

American Muslim Women, Religious Authority, and Activism: More Than a Prayer (Louann Atkins Temple Women & Culture Series)

Muslim Girl Article Did Homosexuality Exist Among Islamic Scholars? http://muslimgirl.com/25788/homosexuality-islam-academic-analysis/

FB Page: Muslims Against Homophobia and LGBT Hate

“Mukhannathun – and singular mukhannath – has been translated as “gay,” “queer,” even “third gender,” and none of these are wrong, per se. However, there’s a history behind the word that’s much richer. It all starts with hadith.“  

from” A Muslim RuPaul At The Dawn Of Islam: Tuwais and the Mukhannathun”: http://www.autostraddle.com/a-muslim-rupaul-at-the-dawn-of-islam-tuwais-and-the-mukhannathun-198612/

The Roots of Homophobia and Anti-Gay Sentiment in the Muslim World (by Ali Olomi)

Sublime Quran [a feminist translation] pdf by Laleh Bakhtiar

QURAN A Reformist Translation pdf Translated and Annotated by Edip Yuksel Layth Saleh al-Shaiban Martha Schulte-Nafeh 

Extensive, long but great read: Islamic Law, Homosexuality and the ‘Pulse’ Massacre by Shaykh Atabek

Aljazeera Article on Indonesia’s Trans Imams: http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/5/12/indonesias-transgender-priests-face-uncertain-future.html

Same-Sex Relationships & the Fluidity of Marriage in Islamic History (by Ali A. Olomi)

3

#notproud of Auckland Pride Parade 2015. Keep talking about this, keep challenging the prison industrial complex, the police as an institution that serves and protects power and property instead of people, pinkwashing of capitalist exploitation, Israeli apartheid and state violence against indigenous people. Keep up the queer-powered resistance against this interconnected festering yuck that is All Oppression. 

Can we please stop perpetuating the idea that if you are not out you are somehow still “waiting” to have the “courage” to lead an authentic life? How many narratives of queerness are you erasing with this fake one-size-fits-all coming-out-of-the-closet narrative? Newsflash: there is more than one legitimate way to be queer, it is patently NOT safe for every queer person on this planet to be out, and telling queer people otherwise is violent and problematic as fuck.

anonymous asked:

Hi what is it that bothers you about gay marriage becoming legal in the US?

What am I supposed to celebrate here? That cis white gay people were successfully able to co-opt a protest against police brutality to push their agenda of “marriage equality”? That “marriage equality” represents the mainstream racist and classist gay rights movement that compares “not being able to marry” to racial apartheid? That liberals managed to turn a potentially radical movement into assimilationist notions of “marriage equality” and “gay pride”? That Uncle Sam has managed to tame the Radical Queer by telling him that all he needs is the ability to marry and have children like straight people, thus making him into another happy consumer who does not challenge the hegemony of a capitalist system? That every time a warmongering US senator or money-hoarding CEO “comes out”, gay people wear it as a badge of honor? That “marriage equality” has become a marker for progress in LGBT rights and it purposely glosses over racial violence, class inequalities, homelessness, discrimination, transphobia, police abuse, prisoner abuse? That by pushing for such legislation, LGBT rights activists have effectively strengthened the state and allowed it to regulate their sexualities and gender identities? That the state can now use gay poster boys to legitimize its discrimination against the new social others? That such legislation is supported by gay people in the military who rape, torture, murder people like me? That gay people take pride in working for the US army and bombing my homeland and killing innocent children? That such legislation relies on and perpetuates a nationalistic narrative that also legitimizes the abuse and torture of people from Third World countries? That such legislation represents precisely how homosexuality has been used as a tool of torture by US soldiers? That people in the US can now wave “marriage equality” and “gay rights” in my face to prove how progressive and modern they are, as compared to a “barbaric”, “illiterate”, “Moslem terrorist” like me? That democrats like Obama who have been pushing for “marriage equality” legislation for a long time can now finally use the “gay card” in the international political landscape to pinkwash US and bully other states into accepting their demands? That such legislation has potentially paved the way for US to use human rights abuses against LGBT people in Third World countries as an excuse to wage wars and pass economic sanctions in the future? That “LGBT rights” organizations working in the US can now hijack the struggles and experiences of queer people from Pakistan like me and use that to define the trajectory of queer rights movements working in my country? That such organizations can now open chapters in countries like Pakistan to “liberate the poor oppressed gays” and jeopardize the local movements and patronize the local activists because they can pretend to be superior on the basis of “marriage equality” in US? That people in the US can now look down upon me and my fellow brothers and sisters as some “backward homophobes” because our main priority is not to have gay weddings and glittered parades? What am I supposed to celebrate? That “gay” just became more capitalist and imperialist?

whitewashing pinkwashing

So there’s this letter I saw regarding the Creating Change “pinkwashing” protest - “OPEN LETTER by Jews of Color and Allies“ and let me tell you, it made me angry. There’s one part of the letter I’d like to mention before going into what really ticked me off:

Many of us were raised with a belief in debate - debate over our faith, debate within our households, debate within our community.  Debate is a core part of Jewish theological belief and cultural identity.  We are ashamed that our community has reacted to the protestors at this event by using our political power to silence debate instead of welcoming criticism and recognizing that as a part of our faith tradition and a part of Creating Change.

“The robbed Cossack”. It’s an old Jewish idiom that describes a situation where the perpetrator of a crime acts as if they are the victim of that crime. A mob of people forcibly shut down an event with no intention of allowing debate, but they are the victims? They are the ones being silenced? 

Next part:

But when people of color protest against a largely white community, they are viewed as “intimidating,” and cause such fear as to “bring us back to the Holocaust.”

The general idea of this letter is that this was a protest by people of color against a white community, a protest that is now being demonized in order to silence them. I find it infuriating they are trying to portray anti-Israel activism as a PoC vs. white issue as it is reductive, harmful and unproductive. It erases the majority of Jews of Color in the world, most of which live in Israel, as well as attaching global ‘white’ identity to Ashkenazim. But here’s the kicker:

We also understand that the protest chant “From the River to the Sea, Palestine will be free” is seen by some as a painful call for the destruction of Israel.  For others, that chant does not conjure up the destruction of Israel, but instead simply speaks to the many human rights - including the basic right to freedom of movement - currently denied to Palestinians.  We beseech others in our community to try to hear this chant differently, even for a moment.  What if we heard the call for freedom as one in which we all got free?  Where all the people of Palestine/Israel enjoyed equal rights?  Where Mizrahi Jews, Ethiopian Jews, and Palestinians were all accorded the same rights and privileges as Ashkenazi Jews?  Do we only stand for plurality when it expresses our own views and protects our own rights?

So first you completely erase my existence so that you can construct this protest against Israeli LGBT groups as a PoC vs. white showdown, and then you invoke me in order to strengthen your argument? And to top it off, you tell me how to feel when I hear a genocidal chant. Spare me your concern, I don’t need your protests, you’re not helping me, you’re only helping your own moral crusade. This protest was anti-Semitic and I can say with great confidence the majority of Jews of Color in Israel would condemn it. You’re entitled to your opinions but you are not entitled to co-opt us.

PS - I very much dislike the suffix “of Color” and I resent having to use it in order to communicate my point.