A guide to pretending you speak Tagalog/Filipino

1. Add “’di ba?” (right?/innit?) to the end of your sentences.

2. Replace “really”/”very” with “talagang” or the question “Really?” with “talaga.”

3. Sprinkle a dash of “kasi” (because, or the “that’s why” that you add to the end of a sentence instead of saying “because.”)

You didn’t ask for directions, that’s why kasi.


4. Use Google Translate to find the most obscure word for what you’re trying to say. Deep Tagalog points.

You’re hair is so marilag and maluwalhati today.

Instagram: @iamkimberlyt

My hair isn’t perfectly curly.
My jeans don’t hug my butt.
I don’t wear fake nails.
I don’t wear makeup everyday.
I have shirts I still wear from middle school.
I still will wear my highschool sweats and sweatshirts….. at the same time.
I don’t fit under the label cool and trendy.
And I’m okay with that.

Love yourself 💘

The Philippine culture is a uniquely indigenous culture that has been neglected for aeons because the colonization of these people distorted their culture enough to that it is almost unrecognizable in the modern world. What the Philippines is missing is a sense of legacy and pride in their uniqueness. Instead, the people have fallen under the spell of the Western world, and their priorities and goals are a hollow echo of the old, outmoded values of Western civilization. The Filipino people are starved for an identity that goes beyond Spain and America. They don’t want to be some other stepchild. They deserve to claim their inheritance…

Having been colonized for so long, we have to rediscover ourselves. European culture is the legacy of kings and the commerce of merchant bankers. Our own culture has been suppressed by centuries of colonial subjugation, and that cannot be achieved without restoring to our people the pride of identity.

—  Way of the Ancient Healer: Sacred Teachings from the Philippine Ancestral Traditions
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Kulintang: One of my favorite Filipinx Instruments!

Kulintang is a modern term for an ancient instrumental form of music composed on a row of small, horizontally laid gongs that function melodically, accompanied by larger, suspended gongs and drums. As part of the larger gong-chime culture of Southeast Asia, kulintang music ensembles have been playing for many centuries in regions of the Eastern Malay Archipelago—the Southern Philippines, Eastern Indonesia, Eastern Malaysia, Brunei and Timor,[6] although this article has a focus on the Philippine Kulintang traditions of the Maranao and Maguindanao peoples in particular. Kulintang evolved from a simple native signaling tradition, and developed into its present form with the incorporation of knobbed gongs from Sunda.[5]Its importance stems from its association with the indigenous cultures that inhabited these islands prior to the influences of Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Christianity or the West, making Kulintang the most developed tradition of Southeast Asian archaic gong-chime ensembles.”

“The kulintang is traditionally considered a women’s instrument by many groups: the Maguindanao, Maranao, Tausūg/Suluk, Samal, Badjao/Sama, Iranun, Kadazan, Murut, Bidayuh and Iban.[26] Traditionally, the playing of the kulintang was associated with graceful, slow, frail and relaxed movements that showed elegance and decorum common among females.[27] Nowadays, the traditional view of kulintang as strictly for women has waned as both women and men play all five instruments, with some of the more renowned kulintang players being men.[28]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulintang#Feminine_instrument