pile ons

After a long, cold and rainy day at work (as well as wet since I had to walk through it DX), this girl just snuggles up in her warm Arale sweater, thanks to @supobi from Japan, and is livin the Rilakkuma life✨

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I got inspired after I decided Bones was part dragon in the tags of the last thing I posted.  Now everyone’s part dragon.

  • portal: probably like 15-20 minutes long in its entirety
  • portal 2: get ready to devote your entire weekend to learning GLaDOS' tragic back story

anonymous asked:

AU where Pidge is constantly being declared a long lost godness whenever they meet an alien race. Pidge now has a hoard of various circlets and crowns.

YES OH MY GOD YES 

“ALL HAIL THE LONG LOST QUEEN VERDE” 
“ugh, not again” 

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My BookOutlet haul finally arrived today! What better way to end this semester than with new books?? 😁💙

who should you fight: fe lords ed.
  • Marth: he doesn't want to fight you. don't make him do this. he might not beat you up, but if you win his wifey ( & Merric ) will.
  • Alm: scary. watch out for the bow. you might be able to take him, but he's ruthless enough you should avoid direct confrontation.
  • Celica: not many people know how to use swords & magic without getting a horse first. watch out. she's hiding something.
  • Sigurd: why are you picking fights with a pile of ash, this one's on you 0/10
  • Celice: let's face it, you probably don't know much about him, and if you do, why are you trying to fight him? drop it. move on.
  • Leaf: this man may not be the best fighter, but he can fight FOREVER. do you want that? Leaf chasing you down? eternally? don't do it unless you're sure you can take him.
  • Roy: he may not be the toughest, but his sword is on fire and he can swing it around like a butter knife. fight him, but be careful.
  • Lyn: she is SO FAST. she might not hurt you much, but you won't be able to hit her at all. avoid fighting Lyn.
  • Eliwood: Eliwood is probably fighting you because Hector dared him too. determined, but not especially threatening. you can probably take him as long as he's not on a horse. fight Eliwood, but don't let him use Durandal.
  • Hector: don't fight Hector. If you fight Hector he will keep asking you to fight. You don't want to fight Hector. you can't kill Hector.
  • Ephraim: fight Ephraim. He wants to fight you. he'll win, but he'll be cool about it after and then you'll be bros. if you win, though, you'll regret it.
  • Eirika: Eirika is cool to fight. you may actually win, but if you win, you'll have to deal with Ephraim, so maybe you should just take the L on this one.
  • Ike: don't fight Ike. Ike has fought so much. he's got a sword that shoots lasers. he's got a bunch of friends. you don't want to fight Ike, but he wants to fight you. resist temptation. he'll be a good bro either way.
  • Micaiah: don't fight Micaiah. she doesn't want to fight you. she's much better at healing. if you don't fight you, she'll fix you up after you lose to some one else.
  • Kris: don't fight Kris. if you don't know why not, that's reason enough.
  • Chrom: fight Chrom. he deserves it, and then he'll laugh and take you out to dinner, whether or not you win.
  • Robin: don't fight Robin. Robin is not as cool about losing as Chrom, and has the brains to make up for any flaw they might have. also, they might have Galeforce.
  • Corrin: fight Corrin. they could learn a thing or two about fighting. they won't be mad at you for winning.

It’s ya girl Errka (she/her)

This is the seventh installment in a series of book recommendations, all of which will introduce you to kickass women from mythologies around the world, all of them written by women. All books listed had to pass the following criteria: 

  • Be written by a woman
  • Be fictional
  • Have a woman as (one of) the protagonist(s)
  • Feature Russian or Slavic mythology

This recommendation list comes on the heels of the Asian mythology rec list, because I really wanted to include Russia (which falls under both Asian and Slavic mythology), but I wanted to keep the country as a whole in one post. @kostromas (x) and @lamus-dworski (x) (x) were kind enough to take some time answering my questions.

While I mainly looked for books ft. Russian and Slavic mythologies (I used this Wiki file as a measure to determine the Slavic region), I also include a few books with other origins, such as Norway and various Eastern European countries, because I think - out of all the recommendation posts I have done and plan to do - this is the one they would fit best in. 

Please note as well that there is a lot of overlap among most of these cultures, with different versions of a character appearing in many, so some of the below classifications may be rather arbitrary (I usually go with what’s 1) listed in the summary, then see if 2) the writer specifies a culture, or if 3) readers had helpful input).

UPDATE: It’s been brought to my attention that this post could do with some clarification and additions. To start with, I’d like to address the small number of books listed under Slavic. I don’t mean to say that only the countries listed are Slavic countries. The list is as limited as it is because I found it difficult to locate books that met all the above listed criteria, and an unconscious fifth - that they be written in English. If you take out any one of those criteria, a larger pool of books would open itself up, and I encourage you to consider that as an option.

While I understand that limiting these lists to books written in or translated into English is not ideal, I also don’t think I am the right person to judge which books written in Slavic languages should be included, as I am not Slavic and don’t speak or read Slavic languages. Readers should be aware though, that reading a book featuring Slavic mythologies or cultures, which are not written by someone who identifies as Slavic, may promote a stereotypical or otherwise harmful depiction of those cultures. 

Moreover, those authors who do hail from the relevant region are more likely to be published if they don’t push the envelope too much to be acceptable for a generic Western audience. Therefore, additional reading of books on and / or featuring Slavic mythologies or cultures can aid in understanding the context of these tales. I have listed a couple of books in the honourable mentions with that in mind, and I have decided to add an asterisk (*) to all works written by an author who is confirmed as hailing from the region their work is set in. Typically, I’ve listed one or two books per author, but do check for their other writing.

Finally, I should add that I might have made a mistake in including Russia in this list. This was done because I wanted to keep the country in one post, rather than splitting it between the Asian list and this one. The Asian one was sufficiently long I didn’t want to add it there, but I might have been better off creating a completely separate list for it rather than including it here.

With the above reasons in mind, I have decided to move the Slavic section up, I have added a number of entries throughout, and expanded the resources list at the bottom.

Slavic

Russia

Other regions (not Slavic or Russian)

Undefined / speculative

Historical fiction

Comics & graphic novels

Some collected tales

Poetry

Honourable mentions

Other lists you can consult

If you have any suggestions for other Slavic and / or Russian women who deserve more attention (and a corresponding book), or which mythology should definitely be in this series, drop me a line!

Other kickass women in mythology: women in Greek mythology | women in Egyptian mythology & historywomen in Mesoamerican mythologies | women in Celtic mythologies | women in Native American mythologies | women in Asian mythologies | women in pirate lore & history

Just One Word January BPC
Day 28: Sub-Genre

Retellings

Keep reading

Two years ago, Jared was diagnosed with depression, and Jensen has been right by his side through all of it, no matter how ugly it got.

They’re staying in a hotel room, enjoying some downtime for the first time in days, having a few beers and watching football. The halftime advertisements start and Jensen gets up to grab himself another beer from the mini fridge.

“Jay, you want another?”

No answer. He looks up from the fridge to see Jared sitting on the couch, completely zoned out and staring at the label of his empty beer bottle like it holds the meaning of life. Ironic, considering the words that come out of his mouth moments later.

“Sometimes, I think about killing myself.”

It’s barely whispered, but Jensen jolts back like he’s just been struck across the face. He can’t move, feels fucking paralyzed as he tries to process the fact that he could lose his best friend, his… whatever the fuck Jared is to him.

“Don’t you dare. Don’t you fucking dare, Jared,” he practically growls.

“It’s not like I’m gonna do it,” Jared mumbles back, and no, that’s not enough. Jared needs to understand how important this is, but hell, Jensen’s never been good with words.

“I need you,” is what he ends up blurting. Then he repeats it, this time less quiet, and fuck, he’s shaking.

He says it again, only this time he’s screaming, and “I need you” reverberates off the thin hotel walls a third, then fourth time.

Jensen doesn’t know when he made his way from the mini fridge to the couch, but now he’s standing in front of a teary-eyed Jared, and he’s not too far from tears himself. So he does all he can think to do in that moment, and hauls Jared up into a tight hug, closing his eyes and practically rocking the man in his arms.

“I need you, okay?”

It’s a whisper this time, and they’re both crying now.

“I need you here, Jared.”

Jared nods into Jensen’s shoulder and they’re both grabbing onto each other like they’re holding on for dear life, and maybe they are.

“I promise I won’t, Jen. I promise I won’t do it, okay? I promise. So long as I’ve got you, I’ll be okay.”

Of course there are bad days. There will always be bad days, but it’s in that moment that Jared learns that he needs to always keep fighting.