pile ons

can i just say that there’s a lot of irony in the whole “ your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should” speech from the first jurassic park movie

like

it’s a commentary on how there are a lot of things that don’t need to happen, yet they do

and then we get a sequel to the movie that was based on the second book that shouldn’t exist because there are characters in that book that died in the first one

and then there’s a third movie that was made just because

and then we got jurassic world like two years ago

don’t get me wrong. i fuckin love jurassic park. it’s my favorite movie franchise ever. i just find it funny that one of the most iconic quotes from the movie applies to the entire franchise (along with the “one big pile of shit” quote)

it’s almost like they patented it, and packaged it, and slapped it on a plastic lunchbox.

oh wait

they did.

tomorrow...

We had to turn on a space heater in my office and that made me think of “White Out’, so here’s some post-ice wall cuddling… TGIF!


There’s a low murmur coming from the kitchen, the quiet but firm voice of Mary Margaret helping to soothe Elsa’s guilt over all that has occurred and her fears of a sister possibly lost forever. Emma knows that this is where she should be stepping up as Savior, but she’s cold and tired and honestly – completely unwilling to pull back from the comfort of Killian’s arms. That damn ice wall might still be up on the edge of town, but the one she’s been keeping up between her and Killian is currently nowhere to be found.

He shuffles slightly and she feels a gentle tug as a few strands of her hair get snagged by the short scruff of his beard. It’s in that moment that she realizes just how tangled up they are and her fatigue-clouded brain begins to try to make sense of how that could be. With her alone in the chair, he must be poised on his knee on the hardwood floor and has been since they all got back to the loft. There’s no way his knee isn’t killing him, but he hasn’t complained and has only jostled her twice, both times moving his body even closer. The thought of the obvious pain he must be in just to hold her has her leaning her head further into his coat to hide the blush creeping over her cheeks.

She’s given him the opening to show her the depth of the affection he feels for her without fear of her rebuff and the strength of it is warming her faster than the pile of blankets draped over her lap. She should let him get up; even if she knows in her heart he doesn’t want to leave her side. What’s even clearer is how much she doesn’t want him to go. She almost died tonight. He could die tomorrow. It’s just the course her life has been set upon and there’s still a needling part of her that wants to push him away before it’s too late. It’s selfish, indulgent, and potentially harmful to them both, but she just wants him here, close, in this fragile bubble of warmth and unguarded need.

“Hey…”

Keep reading

  • portal: probably like 15-20 minutes long in its entirety
  • portal 2: get ready to devote your entire weekend to learning GLaDOS' tragic back story

This is the seventh installment in a series of book recommendations, all of which will introduce you to kickass women from mythologies around the world, all of them written by women. All books listed had to pass the following criteria: 

  • Be written by a woman
  • Be fictional
  • Have a woman as (one of) the protagonist(s)
  • Feature Russian or Slavic mythology

This recommendation list comes on the heels of the Asian mythology rec list, because I really wanted to include Russia (which falls under both Asian and Slavic mythology), but I wanted to keep the country as a whole in one post. @kostromas (x) and @lamus-dworski (x) (x) were kind enough to take some time answering my questions.

While I mainly looked for books ft. Russian and Slavic mythologies (I used this Wiki file as a measure to determine the Slavic region), I also include a few books with other origins, such as Norway and various Eastern European countries, because I think - out of all the recommendation posts I have done and plan to do - this is the one they would fit best in. 

Please note as well that there is a lot of overlap among most of these cultures, with different versions of a character appearing in many, so some of the below classifications may be rather arbitrary (I usually go with what’s 1) listed in the summary, then see if 2) the writer specifies a culture, or if 3) readers had helpful input).

UPDATE: It’s been brought to my attention that this post could do with some clarification and additions. To start with, I’d like to address the small number of books listed under Slavic. I don’t mean to say that only the countries listed are Slavic countries. The list is as limited as it is because I found it difficult to locate books that met all the above listed criteria, and an unconscious fifth - that they be written in English. If you take out any one of those criteria, a larger pool of books would open itself up, and I encourage you to consider that as an option.

While I understand that limiting these lists to books written in or translated into English is not ideal, I also don’t think I am the right person to judge which books written in Slavic languages should be included, as I am not Slavic and don’t speak or read Slavic languages. Readers should be aware though, that reading a book featuring Slavic mythologies or cultures, which are not written by someone who identifies as Slavic, may promote a stereotypical or otherwise harmful depiction of those cultures. 

Moreover, those authors who do hail from the relevant region are more likely to be published if they don’t push the envelope too much to be acceptable for a generic Western audience. Therefore, additional reading of books on and / or featuring Slavic mythologies or cultures can aid in understanding the context of these tales. I have listed a couple of books in the honourable mentions with that in mind, and I have decided to add an asterisk (*) to all works written by an author who is confirmed as hailing from the region their work is set in. Typically, I’ve listed one or two books per author, but do check for their other writing.

Finally, I should add that I might have made a mistake in including Russia in this list. This was done because I wanted to keep the country in one post, rather than splitting it between the Asian list and this one. The Asian one was sufficiently long I didn’t want to add it there, but I might have been better off creating a completely separate list for it rather than including it here.

With the above reasons in mind, I have decided to move the Slavic section up, I have added a number of entries throughout, and expanded the resources list at the bottom.

Slavic

Russia

Other regions (not Slavic or Russian)

Undefined / speculative

Historical fiction

Comics & graphic novels

Some collected tales

Poetry

Honourable mentions

Other lists you can consult

If you have any suggestions for other Slavic and / or Russian women who deserve more attention (and a corresponding book), or which mythology should definitely be in this series, drop me a line!

Other kickass women in mythology: women in Greek mythology | women in Egyptian mythology & historywomen in Mesoamerican mythologies | women in Celtic mythologies | women in Native American mythologies | women in Asian mythologies | women in pirate lore & history

3

My BookOutlet haul finally arrived today! What better way to end this semester than with new books?? 😁💙

Quite Contrary

Here’s a little highly self-indulgent preview/excerpt from Working Title: eeEEeeeeEE BISMUTH or: I was writing a Bismuth fic and half the Pearletariat decided to drop by. As you do.

About 1000 words that aren’t too polished but work pretty well on their own.

“Oh, hey. New recruit? Here for your first weapon?”

Keep reading

pet owner woes:

when ur pet falls asleep on ur stray laundry and gets Shocked and Upset™ when u step on her in the middle of the night bc u can’t fuckin see her