pile dwelling

Switzerland currently has 11 heritage properties recognised by the UNESCO:

1. Rhaetian Railway in the Albula and Bernina Landscapes


2. Jungfrau-Aletsch


3. Three Castles of Bellinzona (only one of them in the picture)


4. Old City of Bern


5. Benedictine Convent of St John at Müstair


6. La Chaux-de-Fonds / Le Locle Watchmaking Town Planning


7. Lavaux, Vineyard Terraces


8. Monte San Giorgio (and its fossils)


9. Prehistoric Pile Dwellings around the Alps


10. Swiss Tectonic Arena Sardona


11. Convent of St.Gall 

(Today and tomorrow is World heritage days in Switzerland!)

How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof! In such places standing alone on the mountaintop it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make — leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents or piled stone — we all dwell in a house of one room — the world with the firmament for its roof — and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.
—  John Muir

Der Starnberger See is the Bavarian capital Munich’s nearest lake. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was already very popular with the Munich court. The 57-square-km lake is around 20 km long, 5 km wide, and up to 127 m deep. It is bordered by moraine hills. Walkers can explore the beauty of the landscape and the various sights on the path that follows long stretches of the shore. Among the best-known towns and villages on the lake are Starnberg, Seeshaupt, Bernried, Tutzing, and Feldafing with Rose Island and the park designed by Peter Joseph Lenné. Tutzing is the location of the Protestant Academy, which today has an international reputation as a meeting place of academics and politicians. The lake has 3 large leisure areas: Kempfenhausen, Ambach, and Possenhofen. The remains of prehistoric pile dwellings on the bottom of Lake Starnberg by Rose Island have been included on UNESCO’s World Cultural Heritage list.

How hard to realize that every camp of men or beast has this glorious starry firmament for a roof!  In such places standing alone on the mountain-top it is easy to realize that whatever special nests we make - leaves and moss like the marmots and birds, or tents or piled stone - we all dwell in a house of one room - the world with the firmament for its roof - and are sailing the celestial spaces without leaving any track.  ~John Muir

Sanatorium Dr. K., South Harz, March 2014.