pigmental

anonymous asked:

Hey Artie! Do you have any idea or theory what exactly the scroll and the monster in Together Breakfast is? It's Gem related but it has no gem tough it seems to have some kind of consciousness. What do you think? I really hope we learn more about these things as well on the show because this monster and the scroll have been something pretty unusual. Has anyone asked the crew already?

yea, actually, someone asked Joe Johnston about this last year. He said:

You’re talking about the breakfast/smoke monster from ‘Together Breakfast.’ Well, to make pigments you use certain minerals to achieve different colors. Those different pigments get use in inks and paints… see where I’m going with this… (source)

if you didn’t know, pigments are made by grinding up certain minerals to produce specific colors. Minerals such as stones, for example lapis lazuli can be used in this way

So, essentially, the scroll was corrupted Gems, ground up into paint. Which has the rather terrifying implication that even if you grind up a gem into a powder, they still retain some consciousness which… eesh.

concord  asked:

What's the best way to avoid damaging manuscripts when you're examining them?

CLEAN, DRY HANDS (and special training for how to handle the manuscripts – turning pages, protecting pigments, supporting the binding, etc.)

—Bryan

10

Albinism, Waardenburg Syndrome, Piebaldism, Vitiligo, Heterochromia. etc…. OCA1A, OCA1B, OCA2, OCA3, OCA4

All of these labels ……..basically describe the same thing….. Why all the confusion?


A person’s eye color results from pigmentation of a structure called the iris, which surrounds the small black hole in the center of the eye (the pupil) and helps control how much light can enter the eye. The color of the iris ranges on a continuum from very light blue to dark brown. Most of the time eye color is categorized as blue, green/hazel, or brown. Brown is the most frequent eye color worldwide. Lighter eye colors, such as blue and green, are found almost exclusively among people of European ancestry.

Eye color is determined by variations in a person’s genes. Most of the genes associated with eye color are involved in the production, transport, or storage of a pigment called melanin. Eye color is directly related to the amount and quality of melanin in the front layers of the iris. People with brown eyes have a large amount of melanin in the iris, while people with blue eyes have much less of this pigment.

A particular region on chromosome 15 plays a major role in eye color. Within this region, there are two genes located very close together: OCA2 and HERC2. The protein produced from the OCA2 gene, known as the P protein, is involved in the maturation of melanosomes, which are cellular structures that produce and store melanin. The P protein therefore plays a crucial role in the amount and quality of melanin that is present in the iris. Several common variations (polymorphisms) in the OCA2 gene reduce the amount of functional P protein that is produced. Less P protein means that less melanin is present in the iris, leading to blue eyes instead of brown in people with a polymorphism in this gene.

A region of the nearby HERC2 gene known as intron 86 contains a segment of DNA that controls the activity (expression) of the OCA2 gene, turning it on or off as needed. At least one polymorphism in this area of the HERC2 gene has been shown to reduce the expression of OCA2, which leads to less melanin in the iris and lighter-colored eyes.

Several other genes play smaller roles in determining eye color. Some of these genes are also involved in skin and hair coloring. Genes with reported roles in eye color include ASIP, IRF4, SLC24A4, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TPCN2, TYR, and TYRP1. The effects of these genes likely combine with those of OCA2 and HERC2 to produce a continuum of eye colors in different people.

anonymous asked:

OH MY GOD YOUR WORK IS SO GOOD!!! I have a question though, did Alexander Hamilton or John Laurens actually have freckles?

thank you!! i’m afraid i can’t answer this question with certainty, but i can say that it’s highly likely that hamilton, at least, had freckles–not only did he grow up in the tropics, where there was plenty of sunlight, he was also said to be fair of skin and a redhead of scottish descent, so it’s very likely to me that he had at least a little freckle action goin’ on there

as for laurens, it’s a possibility, but i don’t have any evidence to back up any claims that he did. 

it’s also important to remember that freckles weren’t fashionable at the time, so there may have been attempts to hide them and blanch their faces, especially for laurens, who was born into a wealthy family (where fair skin was even more celebrated)

actually, pigments to keep the face fair were such a priority at the time that people (especially women) forewent the more harmless pigments like rice flour or talc white and headed straight for the lead white, which, surprise, caused severe reactions and forced them to cake on even more powder. this was mostly an upper class problem, though, since anyone else had far more important things to worry about. however, i’m not certain if there’s any evidence that laurens and hamilton did this–i know that laurens was especially fussy about powdering his hair, and according to male grooming habits at the time, they likely paid attention to their hands, too, but again, i can’t draw up a certain conclusion so my final answer as to whether or not they had freckles is: maybe hamilton, probably not laurens

anonymous asked:

Any tips for a good contour?

find a color that is at least a shade or two darker than your skin tone to contour with.

you can do cream contour, powder contour, or even both. for cream contour there are companies that make cream contour shades, but you can also use any cream concealer that’s one or two shades darker than your skin tone.

to actually contour, apply the contour shade, whether it be cream or powder, in the hollows of your cheeks. i find this looks best if concentrate the pigment slightly more towards your hair line and then blend and diffuse it until you’re happy with it. if you use a cream contour for this, you would then set the cream with powder contour to keep it from moving around.

you can also apply the contour around your temples, on the very top of your forehead, and across your jaw to thin your face even more. you can also apply it on either side of the bridge of your nose in thin lines to make your nose appear thinner. remember to blend and to always always always set the cream with powder. also remember that you don’t always have to use cream! i personally prefer to use powder only but cream + powder usually results in a bolder, sharper contour and i prefer mine to be softer and more natural.

i hope this helped!

smdchanel  asked:

I tested the makeup revolution eyeshadow palettes, and they're good! The only "flaw", is that the matte eyeshadows are less pigmented than the shimmery ones (especially lighter colors) but if you close your eyes on this, they're really good palettes :) I hope this helped you.๐Ÿ’•

Thank you!💖

10

Albinism, Waardenburg Syndrome, Piebaldism, Vitiligo, Heterochromia. etc…. OCA1A, OCA1B, OCA2, OCA3, OCA4

All of these labels ……..basically describe the same thing….. Why all the confusion?

The term albinism [L. albus means ‘white’] refers to a heterogeneous group of congenital disorders in melanin pigment biogenesis. Pigmentation process maybe affected in one or many ways due to mutations. Abnormal pigmentation maybe at the level of embryogenesis in regions where melanocytes fail to populate. The melanin biosynthetic pathway may also be affected due to mutations. Sometimes one or many of the genes responsible for biogenesis of organelles may be mutated.
Albinism may manifest itself as oculocutaneous (OCA) or just ocular (OA). There occur at least ten different types of OCA and four types of OA.OCA refers to a group of autosomal recessive disorders in which melanin is reduced or even absent leading to pale skin with increased risk of skin cancer. OCA1 is caused due to mutations in tyrosinase gene affecting its catalytic or synthetic activity.OCA2 is a condition where TYR gene is not mutated but the P polypeptide is. Mutational defects in TRP-1 protein leads to OCA3.
Ocular albinism results from defects in the melanin system, which may arise from either defects in the OA1 receptor, or mutations of either the Tyr gene or P transporter


OCA1A, OCA1B, OCA2, OCA3, OCA4

A person’s eye color results from pigmentation of a structure called the iris, which surrounds the small black hole in the center of the eye (the pupil) and helps control how much light can enter the eye. The color of the iris ranges on a continuum from very light blue to dark brown. Most of the time eye color is categorized as blue, green/hazel, or brown. Brown is the most frequent eye color worldwide. Lighter eye colors, such as blue and green, are found almost exclusively among people of European ancestry.

Eye color is determined by variations in a person’s genes. Most of the genes associated with eye color are involved in the production, transport, or storage of a pigment called melanin. Eye color is directly related to the amount and quality of melanin in the front layers of the iris. People with brown eyes have a large amount of melanin in the iris, while people with blue eyes have much less of this pigment.

A particular region on chromosome 15 plays a major role in eye color. Within this region, there are two genes located very close together: OCA2 and HERC2. The protein produced from the OCA2 gene, known as the P protein, is involved in the maturation of melanosomes, which are cellular structures that produce and store melanin. The P protein therefore plays a crucial role in the amount and quality of melanin that is present in the iris. Several common variations (polymorphisms) in the OCA2 gene reduce the amount of functional P protein that is produced. Less P protein means that less melanin is present in the iris, leading to blue eyes instead of brown in people with a polymorphism in this gene.

A region of the nearby HERC2 gene known as intron 86 contains a segment of DNA that controls the activity (expression) of the OCA2 gene, turning it on or off as needed. At least one polymorphism in this area of the HERC2 gene has been shown to reduce the expression of OCA2, which leads to less melanin in the iris and lighter-colored eyes.

Several other genes play smaller roles in determining eye color. Some of these genes are also involved in skin and hair coloring. Genes with reported roles in eye color include ASIP, IRF4, SLC24A4, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TPCN2, TYR, and TYRP1. The effects of these genes likely combine with those of OCA2 and HERC2 to produce a continuum of eye colors in different people.

I did a triple emphasis art degree as an undergrad (drawing, sculpture, and ceramics - it’s turning out to be really useful for archaeology even though I didn’t go in with that idea) and my ceramics were almost always high-fire clay with heavy texture and maybe a little dry pigment rubbed in for highlights. Mostly I made animals and I liked this particular sandy-looking high-fire clay. I found this little guy in a box in the loft, he’s really representative and I think I might keep him.

Mas Subramanian wasn’t expecting blue.

In 2009, as part of his lab at Oregon State University, Subramanian — a professor of materials science — was working with students to manufacture new materials that could be used in electronics. They would mix and grind chemicals, then heat them to over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit.

One grad student, Andrew E. Smith, took a particular mix out of the furnace to find it had turned a surprising, bright blue color.

“You know what Louis Pasteur said?” Subramanian asks. “Luck favors the alert mind.”

Pasteur, the French chemist and microbiologist, famously created a vaccine to chicken cholera by accident. Smith and Subramanian, as it turns out, stumbled upon an undiscovered pigment of blue — the first new blue in over 200 years.

A Chemist Accidentally Creates A New Blue. Then What?

Photo: Karl Maasdam/Oregon State University

When you blend a blue with a pink duochrome, and a pink with a blue duochrome, you get… this.

I was working with raw mineral pigments but you can get the look with 

center: MAC Cornflower pigment

inner 1/3: Urban Decay Fishnet or MAC Stars n Rockets

outer corners: MAC Flashtrack

[EDIT] P.S. I also had a little MAC Concrete (matte brown along the socket!)

I did spray my brushes with a mister AFTER picking up the colors, to get a smoother and more intense finish.

(And this is a day look, no matter what they say. Cos duochromes look WAY more psychedelic and much better in daylight.)

3

Oregon State University chemist Mas Subramanian was looking for materials with novel magnetic properties to use in advanced computer hard drives. He would mix up likely chemicals and bake them in a furnace at 2,000 degrees Farenheit. But when he added manganese oxide to the recipe, he got a colorful surprise — a pile of bright blue powder.

The discovery is a pretty big deal because blue is a historically difficult color to manufacture. You can read all about it here!

This spring, Subramanian was a finalist in the Golden Mole Awards, a Skunk Bear prize that celebrates moments of accidental brilliance. Read about all dozen finalists here. There are so many happy accidents!

Why did we name it the Golden Mole Award? This video explains:

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