photoset: miracle on 34th street

“I have been the mother to almost forty children in movies, but I have always had a special place in my heart for little Natalie. She always called me Mamma Maureen and I called her Natasha, the name her parents had given her. She loved making little ceramics on the weekends and used to bring me gifts of lovely painted animals and people. Unfortunately, Hurricane Hugo in St. Croix stole them all and I can’t find even one. They’re up there somewhere in the jet stream watching over me. When Natalie and I shot the scenes in Macy’s, we had to do them at night because the store was full of people doing their Christmas shopping during the day. Natalie loved this because it meant she was allowed to stay up late. I remembered al the tricks we pulled as kids in our house, trying to stay up past bedtime, and so I really enjoyed this time with Natalie. We loved to walk through the quiet, closed store and look at all the toys and girls’ dresses and shoes. The day she died, I cried shamelessly. it was such a horrible way to go for such a lovely, lovely girl.”

Maureen O'Hara on Natalie Wood

anonymous asked:

The little girl in Miracle in 34th Street, Susan Walker, is autistic! It didn't take much urging from her mother to be skeptical and believe only in provable facts. In fact, Susan naturally thinks this way. It was just encouraged. Beyond that, her imagination works a little differently from those of most children, so of course it took some instruction and encouragement for her to play zoo. Susan Walker is the greatest.

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Maureen O’Hara (born August 17, 1920) passed away earlier today at ninety-five years of age after living the last few years with her grandson in Idaho. O’Hara, a no-nonsense Irish-American actress whose father frowned upon her dreams of becoming a stage actress, was one of the final surviving superstars of Hollywood’s Golden Age/height of the classic Studio System and leaves behind a body of work in which she is best remembered for playing headstrong, assertive characters that retained an extraordinary sense of warmth. O’Hara, as seen in the uppermost picture, received her only Oscar - an Honorary Academy Award - alongside Harry Belafonte, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Hayao Miyazaki last November (in that ceremony, Miyazaki, in his acceptance speech, remarked how ecstatic he was in finally meeting O’Hara).

Nine of the films she appeared in appear above. The names of the films follow (left-right, descending):

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1939) - directed by William Dieterle; also starring Charles Laughton, Sir Cedric Hardwicke, Thomas Mitchell, and Edmond O’Brien

How Green Was My Valley (1941) - directed by John Ford; also starring Walter Pidgeon, Anna Lee, Donald Crisp, and Roddy McDowall; featuring music by Alfred Newman

Miracle on 34th Street (1947) - directed and written by George Seaton; also starring John Payne, Natalie Wood, Edmund Gwenn, Porter Hall, and Gene Lockhart

The Black Swan (1942) - directed by Henry King; also starring Tyrone Power

The Parent Trap (1961) - directed and written by David Swift; produced by Walt Disney and George Golitzen; also starring Hayley Mills, Brian Keith, Joanna Barnes, Charlie Ruggles, Cathleen Nesbitt, and Una Merkel

Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation (1962) - directed by Henry Koster; also starring James Stewart and Fabian

McLintock! (1963) - directed by Andrew V. McLaglen; also starring John Wayne, Patrick Wayne, and Yvonne De Carlo

Only the Lonely (1991) - directed and written by Chris Columbus; also starring John Candy, Ally Sheedy, Anthony Quinn, and James Belushi; featuring music by Maurice Jarre

The Quiet Man (1952) - directed and co-produced by John Ford; also starring John Wayne, Barry Fitzgerald, Ward Bond, and Victor McLaglen; featuring music by Victor Young and cinematography by Winton Hoch

Other films of note: Jamaica Inn (1939), Dance Girl, Dance (1940), Rio Grande (1950), The Wings of Eagles (1957), Spencer’s Mountain (1963)

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HAPPY 96TH BIRTHDAY MAUREEN O’HARA | August 17, 1920 - Octobber 24, 2015

“Every star has that certain something that stands out and compels us to notice them. As for me I have always believed my most compelling quality to be my inner strength, something I am easily able to share with an audience. I’m very comfortable in my own skin. I never thought my looks would have anything to do with becoming a star, yet it seems that in some ways they did.“

Whenever I’m describing a TV show or movie to someone that hasn’t seen it, I always use equations with something they HAVE seen. For example:

Chicago = Orange is the New Black - lesbians + musical numbers

Miracle on 34th Street = How to get Away with Murder - murder + Santa

The Librarian = Indiana Jones - Indiana + a dweeb

Stardust = Princess Bride + Hocus Pocus + Game of Thrones

Young and Hungry = Disney Channel Sitcom + sex + gay

Kaijudo = Avatar the Last Airbender + Pokémon

Galaxy Quest = Star Trek - the 4th wall

Torchwood = Doctor Who - time travel + gay

Please add your own, I just love these!