photogenetics

Digital Outtakes of Work in Progress from 2005

“I take each one- and they’re very small. I set them up as though I’m posing them the way a photographer would. Whatever else goes on has to do with the camera, because they have to be posed in such a way that they do something, say something. They’re able to express the next few steps, and I never know what they are. The best part is that I really never know what these things are going to morph into.”
- Ida Applebroog

Instagram:

First polaroids for @photogenicsla ️ Also, you guys, I hit a million followers on Instagram today. Never, when my friend forced me to sign up for this weird new app something like 3 years ago, did I think this would become whatever it has. I invite you to scroll through to my first posts. It’s all there. One of my first posts was something like “crying because I wish I in LA.” Who.the.hell.would.have.known. Follow your dreams.

Astronomy Picture of the Day: July 7th, 2009

Unspeakable beauty and unimaginable bedlam can be found together in the Trifid Nebula. Also known as M20, this photogenic nebula is visible with good binoculars towards the constellation of Sagittarius. The energetic processes of star formation create not only the colors but the chaos. The red-glowing gas results from high-energy starlight striking interstellar hydrogen gas. The dark dust filaments that lace M20 were created in the atmospheres of cool giant stars and in the debris from supernovae explosions. Which bright young stars light up the blue reflection nebula is still being investigated. The light from M20 we see today left perhaps 3,000 years ago, although the exact distance remains unknown. Light takes about 50 years to cross M20.

Credit: Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, U. Arizona

Digital Outtake of a Work in Progress from 2005

“At one point, the term ‘cloning’ occurred to me and I thought, ‘Oh my God, am I creating all these deformed pieces!’ I can’t explain what they do to me except that they feel like they’re not deformities- they’re just very beautiful.”
- Ida Applebroog 

via Art21 . Ida Applebroog . Biography . Documentary Film | PBS

Digital Outtakes of Work in Progress from 2005

“These little pieces seem so ordinary and like nothing. If I place them on my stage, these little mounds of clay become monumental. You photograph them any way you like, zoom in on any part of the body, and they become something totally different.”

- Ida Applebroog

via Art21 . Ida Applebroog . Biography . Documentary Film | PBS