photo taken by julie

https://pointandshooter.tumblr.com

That one moment - This photo is not related to any important events in 2016, but it is special to me. I had been taken photos downtown on a hot July day this year. I am a new photographer and I had been trying hard to take some serious ‘artistic’ photos. I wasn’t really satisfied with my photos that day. On my way back to my car, i walked past a park and there were a group of kids playing in the fountains. I found a seat in the shade and took photos of the kids playing for the next twenty minutes. I ended up with some of the best photos I had taken all year. I realized, like those kids, I should just relax and have fun when taking photos. Whenever I am stressed it is nice to look at those kids dancing in the fountains at the end of a hot day.

Thank you for sharing “That one moment” 2016 with us

PWS - Photos Worth Seeing

VOLTRON ANIMATORS NASA CONSPIRACY THEORY??????????

THIS

IS PLUTO’S MOON KERBEROS. YOU NERDS MAY KNOW IT AS THE MOON THAT SHIRO, MATT AND MR. HOLT WERE ABDUCTED FROM.

KERBEROS WAS DISCOVERED ON 28/06/2011 BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE BUT WAS ONLY OFFICIALLY NAMED IN JULY 2013.

THE IMAGE WE HAVE OF IT WAS ONLY TAKEN IN JULY 2015, AND THIS PHOTO WAS RELEASED TO THE PUBLIC IN OCTOBER 2015. BEFORE THE PHOTOS WERE RELEASED, SCIENTISTS HAD ASSUMED KERBEROS WAS A DARK MOON AND DIDN’T HAVE MUCH ALBEDO (LIGHT REFLECTION FROM ICE). 

BUT AS WE SEE HERE

IN VOLTRON: LEGENDARY DEFENDER KERBEROS IS PORTRAYED AS VERY BRIGHT AND WHITE, AND COVERED IN ICE (hence the ice core samples taken by Shiro and the team).

 SUSPICIOUS???

HOW DID THE VOLTRON ANIMATING TEAM KNOW HOW TO ANIMATE KERBEROS? THE SERIES WAS RELEASED ON 10/06/2016, SURELY THEY WOULD HAVE HAD TO ANIMATE IT AND AT LEAST COME UP WITH THE STORYBOARD SEVERAL MONTHS EARLIER. HOW DID THEY DO THIS BEFORE THE NEW PHOTOGRAPHS AND INFORMATION ABOUT KERBEROS WAS RELEASED? ARE THEY IN LEAGUE WITH NASA? DID THEY GAIN ACCESS TO PRIVATE INFORMATION? THIS IS CLEARLY A SERIOUS COVER-UP. I CAN’T BELIEVE THE KORRA ANIMATORS ARE BEING FED TOP-SECRET INTERGALACTIC INFORMATION BY NASA. 

David Lee “Tex” Hill (July 13, 1915 – October 11, 2007)

(Photo taken October, 1944)

Tex Hill was a fighter pilot and flying ace in World War II, with later service in Korea.

Hill earned his wings as a U.S. Naval Aviator in 1939 and joined the fleet as a TBD Devastator torpedo bomber pilot aboard the USS Saratoga before joining a Vought SB2U Vindicator dive bomber squadron aboard USS Ranger. In 1941, he was recruited with other Navy, Army and Marine Corps pilots to join the 1st American Volunteer Group (better known by its later nickname of the Flying Tigers). He learned to fly the P-40 in the AVG training program in Burma, and did well as a fighter pilot in the 2nd Pursuit Squadron (Panda Bear) as a flight leader and then squadron commander, becoming one of the top aces under the tutelage of Claire Chennault.[1]

Hill landed his first [victories] on January 3, 1942 when he downed two Nates over the Japanese airfield at Tak, Thailand. He shot down two more on January 23, and became an ace on the 24th when he shot down a fighter and a bomber over Rangoon. In March, he succeeded Jack Newkirk as Squadron Leader of the Second Squadron. By the time the AVG was disbanded in the summer of 1942, Hill was a double ace, credited with 12 ¼ victories.

On May 7, 1942, the Japanese Army began building a pontoon bridge across the Salween River, which would allow them to move troops and supplies into China. To stem this tide, 2nd Squadron Leader Hill led a flight of four new P-40Es bombing and strafing into the mile deep gorge. During the next four days, the AVG pilots flew continuous missions into the gorge, effectively neutralizing the Japanese forces. From that day on, the Japanese never advanced farther than the west bank of the Salween. Claire Chennault would later write of these critical missions, “The American Volunteer Group had staved off China’s collapse on the Salween.”

On Thanksgiving Day 1943, he led a force of 12 B-25s, 10 P-38s, and 8 new P-51s from Saichwan, China, on the first strike against Formosa. The Japanese had 100 bombers and 100 fighters located at Shimchiku Airfield, and the bombers were landing as Hill’s force arrived. The enemy managed to get seven fighters airborne, but they were promptly shot down. Forty-two Japanese airplanes were destroyed, and 12 more were probably destroyed in the attack. The American force returned home with no casualties.

After the deactivation of the Flying Tigers in July 1942, Hill was one of only five Flying Tigers to join its USAAF successor, the USAAF 23rd Fighter Group, with the rank of major. He activated the 75th Fighter Squadron and later commanded the 23rd Fighter Group as a Colonel. Before returning to the states in late 1944, Hill and his P-51 scratched another six Japanese aircraft.

It is believed that he was the first to down a Zero with a P-51. Altogether, Hill was credited with destroying 18.25 enemy aircraft. The .25 [victoriy] comes from an assist; he and 3 other pilots worked together to shoot down a Japanese Nate fighter.

In 1944, Hill returned to the U.S. and took command of the 412th Fighter Group, America’s first operational jet fighter group flying the P-59 Airacomet and the P-80 Shooting Star. He separated from active service in the USAAF in 1945.

Postwar, in July 1946, Hill was asked by Texas Governor Coke Stevenson to activate and accept command of the 136th Fighter Group of the Texas Air National Guard. Hill activated Guard units throughout the Gulf Coast and became the youngest Brigadier General in the history of the Air National Guard. He once again saw combat during the Korean War with the Texas Air National Guard.

He ended his military career in the Air Force Reserve, retiring as a Brigadier General. He holds the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross with three Oak Leaf Clusters, Presidential Unit Citation with Oak Leaf Cluster, Chinese Order of the Cloud and Banner 4th, 5th and 6th grades, 2-Star Wing Decorations, Chinese Victory Medal, Legion of Merit, and British Distinguished Flying Cross.

(Photo courtesy of Owen Miller)

7

September 27, 2015 - (photos taken July 11, 2015) Now that I’ve sorted through my photos from Singapore, I can give you a more complete picture of my experience in the epiphyte garden at the Singapore Botanic Gardens. I focused mostly on all the wonderful Tillandsia xerographica plants. When they’re suspended and given all the light, humidity, and water they desire, their leaves flow down like silver ribbons!