philippine presidents

We talked recently about the dire situation going on in The Philippines where President Rodrigo Duterte has declared open season on drug dealers, drug users, drug enablers and anyone who has seen the first five minutes of Blow. Police (and regular citizens) gun down people suspected of being involved in the country’s massive drug trade and, as of September, over 2,400 people are dead as a result of this drug war– that’s a goddamn genocide. But what of the children? They also need to be warned that drugs are bad for you (because the police will gun you down on the street if you touch them). But how do you make a genocidal macho autocrat who calls other world leaders “son of a bitch” and UN experts “stupid” kid-friendly? Well, why don’t you ask President Rodrigo’s puppet surrogate?

Defiling the ghost of Jim Henson, the President has put together a puppet show about himself and the chief of police battling drug dealers, then toured it around for schoolchildren.

Human history has seen a lot of fucked up abuses of power, but at least up until this point no bloody regime has ever had the bright idea of turning their executions into a Saturday morning breakfast cartoon (with an upcoming comic book to boot). But the real mascot of the regime is none other than a full body costumed mascot resembling police chief Ronald “Rock” dela Rosa, who will rhythmically gyrate away any human rights concerns you might have.

7 Goofy Cartoon Mascots (For Truly Horrible Things)

President and Mrs. Sergio Osmeña. 

Mrs. Osmeña’s love for Don Sergio was enduring and though they shied away from expressing their feelings for each other openly, the quiet devotion each one had for the other was undeniable.

During one birthday, Mrs. Osmeña gifted Don Sergio with a Bible with an inscription that reads:

Sergio de mi Corazon, Sabiendo como se cuanto amas la verdas, he pensado que ningun regalo sera para ti mejor que “El Libro de la Verdad.” Aceptalo con el mismo amor con que te lo di, Tu Esperanza.

Sergio of my heart, Knowing how much you love the truth, I was thinking that there is no better gift for you than “The Book of Truth.” Accept it with the love that I have for you, Your Esperanza.  

Roughly a week in and we have:

Women’s marches all over the world
Trump taking action re being anti-abortion
Scientists getting into politics
Data re global warming getting censored??? (No really whut)
Twitter accounts being censored???
Trump temporarily banning refugees from Muslim majority countries + temporarily stopping the issuance of visas to said countries
Iran fighting back and taking reciprocal measured
The Mexican leader cancelling a meeting with Trump
Trump and the infamous bloody drug war- spearheading Philippine president extending their support to each other

It’s been quite a week, folks. 207 more weeks to go.

“I was personally involved in taking down the planet’s most notorious drug trafficker, Pablo Escobar, in 1993. While we managed to make Colombia a bit safer, it came at a tremendous price.” —César Gaviria, former president of Colombia

former president césar gaviria wrote a new york times op-ed decrying the violent anti-drug campaign in the philippines led by president rodrigo duterte

President Duterte Is Repeating My Mistakes | New York Times

Illegal drugs are a matter of national security, but the war against them cannot be won by armed forces and law enforcement agencies alone. Throwing more soldiers and police at the drug users is not just a waste of money but also can actually make the problem worse. Locking up nonviolent offenders and drug users almost always backfires, instead strengthening organized crime.

That is the message I would like to send to the world and, especially, to President Rodrigo Duterte of the Philippines. Trust me, I learned the hard way.

We Colombians know a thing or two about fighting drugs. Our country has long been one of the world’s primary suppliers of cocaine. With support from North American and Western European governments, we have poured billions of dollars into a relentless campaign to eradicate drugs and destroy cartels.

full article

President Sergio Osmeña hears mass with Generals (Basilio) Valdes and (Carlos P.) Romulo. Behind is Ismael Mathay Sr.  

President Osmeña had been, throughout his life, a very religious man. He was born, bred, and educated, a Roman Catholic. He was not just another Catholic. he was a practicing Catholic.

He never missed religious obligations. He went to church regularly, and whenever time and opportunity allowed it, even daily.

Even while on exile in the United States during the war years, he never failed to go to church.

Memoirs by Elpidio I. Valencia

Bravo

I would like to congratulate the Philippine Supreme Court for introducing a new word in the dictionary:

Hero - a former president dictator who systematically plundered the public coffers so much so that until now we are in deep debt, institutionalised cronyism by appointing all those loyal to him to the highest positions while ordering the killing of any opposition under the guise of peace and order (martial law), and buying all media outlets and changing textbooks to proclaim he is the best president in Philippine history - a thorough brainwashing that decades later a lot of filipinos, and apparently judges of the supreme court, see him as a divine hero.

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THE 2016 PHILIPPINE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES

(candidates are posted alphabetically with regards to their last names)
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(( SO YEAHHH, this was what I was talking about, about the “unrealistic” Hurreyeahhh, unrealistic, since they’re all younger than they look. Than they actually look at least //slapped ))

(( I did these last time during the last presidential debate stuff but ahhh suddenly I got art blocked. OTL ))

(( So yeah, while watching the debate, I suddenly had a thought of “what would they look like if they were younger” and stuff so ta-dah, thus I made WIPs of these and asdfjksdf yes I’m finally done orz ))

(( HAHAHA YEAH SOME DON’T REALLY LOOK LIKE THEM ALKSJDFKJSDF THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU ANIMU //SLAPPED ))

(( JoKe LANG, but yeah, I had fun doing their color schemes tho. ))

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HELLO EVERYONE! MAY 9 IS UP AND COMING! THIS IS A MOMENTOUS …MOMENT (MALAMANG //SMACKED)

SO WE REALLY REALLY ASK OF YOU TO (ESP. THE REGISTERED VOTERS) TO PARTICIPATE AND EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT AND PRIVILEGE TO VOTE!

AND WHILE YOU’RE AT IT, PLEASE ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT YOU ARE NOT ONLY VOTING FOR YOURSELF, BUT FOR ALL OF US AND FOR THE FUTURE.

MARAMING KAIBIGAN, AT MABUHAY PO KAYO!!!
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SPECIAL NOTE:
“*COUNTRIES DO NOT VOTE for their leaders. It would be extremely biased and unjustified if we can, why? We aren’t representing the people anymore, we are now being plain individuals if we are already going to vote.
Voting is a privilege that those who have legally registered have. Please use this small but powerful ability you have, wisely.
Hope everyone understood that.”
*just our headcanon with regards to voting, idk about the others, but we have long stuck with this so yeah

2,000 people have been killed in a state-sponsored drug war in the Philippines

The number of state-sponsored extrajudicial killings continues to mount in the Philippines, where President Rodrigo Duterte’s crackdown on the illegal drug trade has resulted in around 2,000 deaths in just two months, Reuters reported.

Duterte’s communications secretary, Martin Andanar, said in a statement that the police killings were a necessary part of the state’s effort to end the country’s illegal drug trade. “They must understand, this is a war and there are casualties,“ he said.

Raffy Lerma, a photographer for the Philippine Daily Inquirer, told CNN that despite covering gory natural disasters with horrifying body counts, what he’s seen during the course of the drug war has been worse. (WARNING: GRAPHIC)

Pres. Osmeña confers with American and Filipino officials in Leyte. 

Papa never wore anything outside the army-issued khaki uniform he wore from Hollandia to Leyte, and from Leyte to Lingayen, and eventually, Manila.

For Papa, who was a fastidious dresser all his life, donning the khaki uniform was a supreme sacrifice, yet he thought nothing of it at all.

He wanted to be the stellar example of the austere living he invoked among his family and the nation at large. 

Memoirs by Elpidio I. Valencia

Philippine heroes’ zodiac signs!!

Aries: Emilio Aguinaldo okay okay i GET it yall dont want him as a HERO BUT FORGIVE ME I HAD NO ONE ELSE ON THE TOP OF MY HEAD OK

Birthdate: March 23rd

-The first Philippine President.

Taurus: Gregoria De Jesus

Birthdate: May 9th

-Mother of the Philippine Revolution.

Gemini: Jose Rizal

Birthdate: June 19th

-The National Hero of the Philippines.

Cancer: Apolinario Mabini

Birthdate: July 22nd or July 23

(Is nationally celebrated on July 23th but some historians favor July 22th. birthday twins kami!!!)

-The “sublime paralytic” and Brains of the Revolution.

Leo: Manuel L. Quezon

Birthdate: August 19th

-President of the Commonweath

Virgo: Marcelo H. Del Pilar

Birthdate: August 30th

-A revolutionary propagandist. 

Libra: Artemio Ricarte

Birthdate: October 20th 

-Father of the Philippine Army.

Scorpio: Antonio Luna

Birthdate: October 29th

-The Fiery General.

Sagittarius: Andres Bonifacio

Birthdate: November 30th

-The Father of the Revolution.

Capricorn: Melchora Aquino

Birthdate: January 6th

-Grand Woman of the Revolution.

Aquarius: Julian Felipe

Birthdate: January 28th

-Composer of the National Anthem.

Pisces: Gabriela Silang

Birthdate: March 19th

-The Joan of Arc of Ilocos. 

buzzfeed.com
Philippines President Compares Himself To Hitler, Says He'd "Be Happy To Slaughter" 3 Million Drug Users
President Rodrigo Duterte likened his anti-drug campaign that has left more than 3,000 people dead to Nazi Germany under Adolf Hitler, who killed millions of Jews.
By Michelle Broder Van Dyke

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte told reporters in Davao City on Friday that he would “be happy to slaughter” 3 million drug users, like Adolf Hitler had murdered about 6 million Jews.

The 71-year-old leader said he had been “portrayed to be some cousin of Hitler” by critics, Reuters reported. “There are 3 million drug addicts (in the Philippines). I’d be happy to slaughter them.”

“If Germany had Hitler, the Philippines would have…” he said, pointing to himself, according to Reuters.

“You know my victims. I would like (them) to be all criminals to finish the problem of my country and save the next generation from perdition.”

And once again, our national embarrassment makes it to the world’s headlines and it’s for making antisemitic comments. Comparing drug offenders with the Holocaust victims? That’s just very awful.

Mind you, if only it was possible, we’d ask for Duterte (along with De Lima) to be taken away from us (doesn’t matter if it’s a natural death, a disease or a “CIA assassination” that causes it) and for Miriam Santiago to be returned to us. This country doesn’t deserve a piece of trash like Duterte.

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13 Countries that Beat the US to Putting a Woman on Paper Currency

So the U.S is a little late to the game. 

Mexico’s got Frida Kahlo

the Philippines have former President Corazon Acquino

New Zealand has their famous suffragette Kate Sheppard

women’s rights activist Fatma Aliye Topuz is on Turkey’s 50-Lira note

there’s Queen Zenobia on Syria’s note

Cameroon even has an unidentified woman

Japan’s first prominent woman writer Ichiyo Higuchi is on the 5,000 Yen note

Australia has got their opera singer Nellie Melba

Eva Perone on Argentina’s 100-Peso bill

Sweden has “Pippi Longstocking” creator Astrid Lindgren

Denmark has author and baroness Karen von Blixen-Finecke

Jane Austen is due to be featured on England’s 10-pound note

Israel will feature two women Rachel Bluwstein and Leah Goldberg

Peace is still possible in Duterte's Philippines

“Let us fix Mindanao”, beseeched Philippines President Rodrigo Duterte in the final leg of his presidential campaign in front of thousands of enthusiastic supporters. “I am pleading with you, let us fix this. We belong to one nation.” As the first successful presidential candidate from Mindanao, Duterte has never failed to remind the Catholic-majority electorate about the moral and political obligation to “correct the historical injustice committed against the Moro people”. Time and again, Duterte has emphasised his own Muslim heritage, through his maternal ancestors, presenting himself as the president for all Filipinos, including the Moro minority. In one of his particularly emotional presidential campaign speeches, Duterte promised, “If I become president, if Allah [God] gives his blessing, before I die since I am old, I will leave to you all a Mindanao that is governed in peace.” Duterte’s presidency meant a historic opportunity to rally a diverse and divided nation under the same flag. Eight months into office, however, Duterte is confronting the prospect of full-blown terrorism in Mindanao, as affiliates of the so-called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL, also known as ISIS) expand their area of operations with renewed vigour, beheading one hostage after the other.

Reign of terror

The ongoing conflict in Mindanao is the latest iteration of a centuries-old struggle for domination of the Muslim-majority regions of the Philippines. At its very heart, it is about a struggle for autonomy and self-determination. The Filipino Muslim (Moro) minority, which reigned supreme during the Medieval and Renaissance periods, has had to contend with the triple challenges of the Spanish inquisition, American colonisation, and coercive assimilation under “imperial Manila” in modern times. Devastated by civil strife, terrorism, and all-out armed conflict, Mindanao suffers from one of the highest rates of poverty, illiteracy and unemployment anywhere in the world (PDF). It has among the lowest Human Development Index indicators, giving birth to an ecosystem of rage and despair, which has been exploited by extremist groups, who thrive on hatred and violence. While major Moro rebel groups - namely the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) - have engaged in peace negotiations with the Philippine government, their breakaway factions have morphed into formidable and violent groups such as Abu Sayyaf and Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters. READ MORE - Inside Abu Sayyaf: Blood, drugs and conspiracies Initially, a combination of robust Philippine-America counterterror cooperation and determined peaceful negotiations drove these groups into the underground. In the past three years, however, after pledging their allegiance to the ISIL, which formally recognised their Bay'ah, the extremist groups stepped up their kidnap, ransom and piracy operations with frightening efficacy, with the ultimate goal of establishing a “Wilayat” in Southeast Asia. After a spate of sea kidnappings, targeting international vessels roaming the Philippines’ porous maritime border with Indonesia and Malaysia, the three neighbouring countries were forced to consider joint patrol operations. OPINION: Rodrigo Duterte’s peace plans are in tatters “The continued kidnapping and piracy there is a major concern. It is so frustrating how they continue to elude us with impunity,” Philippine Secretary of Defence Delfino Lorenzana told the Financial Times. The situation has become so dire that Duterte was prompted to give green light to Indonesia to chase the terror groups all the way into Philippine waters and “go ahead and blast them off” if necessary.

Second Somalia

More recently, Duterte went so far as threatening to declare martial law in Mindanao to stamp out terrorism and called upon China and other naval powers to conduct sea patrols in the area. Some experts are beginning to compare the situation to Somali piracy in the Gulf of Aden, which has similarly, though on a larger scale, threatened international maritime trade. As the chairman of the Association of Southeast Asia Nations, Duterte, is expected to place the fight against terrorism at the centre of the regional agenda. The whole Asia Pacific region is deeply worried about ISIL's inroads into Southeast Asia and the corollary prospects of a “distant caliphate” in East Asia. The ASEAN is scrambling to come up with multilateral mechanisms, which will facilitate expanded intelligence-sharing, tactical cooperation and joint patrols among affected nations. The current trepidations stand in stark contrast to the overflowing optimism during Duterte’s earlier months in office. Back then, some even suggested the possibility, though half-jokingly, that the controversial and tough-talking Filipino leader could bag the Nobel Peace Prize if he managed to achieve the elusive peace that repeatedly slipped through the grip of even his most capable and genuine predecessors.

‘The ultimate saviour’

Practically all major rebel groups looked up to him as the ultimate saviour, a man who could unlock the mystery of peace. Blessed with unprecedented political capital, a longtime friend of rebel leaders such as Nur Misuari (founder of the modern Moro nationalist movement), a person with Muslim heritage and the venerable son of Mindanao, Duterte was in a uniquely auspicious position to end the decades-long conflict in his home island. Yet, so far the Filipino leader has expended much of his political capital on a controversial war on drugs, which has invited heavy criticism from across the world, and seemingly fruitless peace negotiations with communist rebels, which are preparing for a new round of all-out war. OPINION: Rodrigo Duterte - A new era in the Philippines To defeat extremism, Duterte will have to put the full force of his office and the sheer gravity of his charisma behind the largely frozen peace negotiations with rebel groups. This is the Filipino president’s best shot at mitigating the ecosystem of terror and fulfil his campaign promise of lasting peace on his home island of Mindanao. Duterte may after all still be the Philippines’ last hope for unifying a broke nation. Richard Javad Heydarian is a specialist in Asian geopolitical/economic affairs and author of Asia’s New Battlefield: The USA, China, and the Struggle for the Western Pacific. The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial policy.
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Quezon City Jail, Manila, Philippines.

Built by the Spanish in the 19th Century, Bilibid, as it is commonly known, was home to prisoners of war during the Japanese occupation of Manila in World War II. Built for 800 inmates, today it houses over 3,800. The prison is now in the heart of Manila, surrounded by tin roof houses.

Picture 2 (taken at Bilibid, © Daily Mail) is part of a series that’s making the rounds in the international news (”Inside the Philippines Quezon City Jail“ is an example), also because of the recent zero tolerance policy (especially on drug related offences) of the Philippine’s new president Rodrigo Duterte.

But Manila has also another prison, the immense New Bilibid (picture 3), spanning over 400 acres. Built to house 17,719 inmates, the population in 2011 (before the recent wave of arrests) was 36,295.

THE BARONG TAGALOG

The Barong Tagalog, more commonly known as simply Barong (and occasionally called Baro), is an embroidered formal shirt which is considered the national dress of thePhilippines. It is lightweight and worn untucked over an undershirt.


Today, in lowland Christian Filipino culture it is common formal attire, especially at weddings. Less formal variants are used also as uniform in schools, universities and offices. Through the years, it has occasionally been feminized and worn by women. This may be seen either as an egalitarian or haute couture fashion statement, or as a form of power dressing when worn by female politicians such as when Philippine President Corazon Aquino wore it at various times during her presidency.


The Barong Tagalog was popularized as formal wear by President Ramón Magsaysay, who wore it to most private and state functions, including his own inauguration.

Source of Information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barong_Tagalog

Okay so people have filed for presidential candidacy here in the Philippines

And some of these candidates are

Well let’s just

well

I’ll be honest this one’s pretty normal for the Catholic overpopulated Philippines 

Ah yes let’s all burn flags that;s a great display of diplomacy and mental and emotional stability (although I can’t honestly blame the guy with what China’s been pulling lately)

I couldn’t make this shit up if I tried (good god no) 

I feel you Arturo I also wish we had more seasons than “it’s too hot I’m gonna die” and “fuck it’s raining FUCK IT’S FLOODING” 

Originally posted by duckoxymoron

I trust this guy in particular