philadelphia restaurants

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Philly’s “pay what you can” restaurant offers new solution to food insecurity

  • 22% of all Philadelphians are food insecure. 
  • Enter EAT (Everyone At the Table) Café, a nonprofit, pay-what-you-wish cafe that opened in West Philadelphia in late October.
  • On the menu: three courses, including soup or salad, a hearty entree with a side and dessert, as well as a hot or cold beverage. 
  • Guests can pay the suggested price of the check, less, more (as a donation) or nothing at all. Read more

Philly Mag recently asked me to create an illustration for an article on the restaurant business. The most creative and successful chefs have a partner working behind the scenes, handling the less glamorous day to day operations of the business.Sounds good to me! Anyone want to manage my affairs so I can draw all day? :)

halloweenpjs  asked:

are you a philadelphian b/c me too and also why do philly people (and some jersey people) call it water ice? (italian ice/according to my very incorrect boyfriend raised in georgia, "frozen lemonade in different flavors"/very much not the same thing as shaved ice or sno cones)

YES I AM, AND I’M JUST HAZARDING A GUESS ON THIS BUT IT PROBABLY HAS SOMETHING TO DO WITH PHILLY AND JERSEY HAVING A REALLY HIGH ITALIAN-AMERICAN POPULATION, AND GENERALLY WHEN SOMETHING IS NAMED AFTER A PLACE OR POPULATION, THAT MODIFIER IS DROPPED AMONG MEMBERS OF THAT GROUP. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU ONLY HEAR IT CALLED A “PHILLY CHEESE STEAK” OUTSIDE PHILADELPHIA, AND FRENCH RESTAURANTS ARE JUST CALLED “RESTAURANTS” IN FRANCE. 

I’D BET THE NAME “WATER ICE” COMES FROM THE CONVENTION OF NAMING IT AFTER THE INGREDIENTS, WHICH IS ALSO WHERE WE GET “ICE CREAM,” WHICH IS MADE THE IN THE EXACT SAME WAY EXCEPT WITH– GET THIS– ICE AND CREAM. AND THEY COULDN’T CALL IT “ICE WATER” BECAUSE THAT’S ALREADY A THING!

Attention Philadelphians

Okay, so I’m going to be in Philadelphia for 3-4 days in mid-August. And I happen to be a bit of a foodie who never gets to indulge because everyone else in my house is either super picky or mildly allergic to things. Therefore, I am motivated to go and eat like kings.


Everyone and their kid brother has been telling me Reading Market, so that’s on the list… but I’d like to hear some other suggestions if possible. Center city, walkable, coffee shops where one can sit for hours and write in peace are a plus, especially if they’re not Starbucks. (Or if they are, that’s okay too.)

It’s 6 p.m. on a Wednesday night and there’s a line out the door at EAT Café. Inside, executive chef and restaurant manager Donnell Jones-Craven is busy plating up salads and burgers, but he pauses to sprint out into the dining room. “I appreciate so much that you’re all here for dinner tonight!” he calls out to those still waiting in line. “Just bear with us and we’ll get you seated as soon as we can.”

Tucked into a crossroads of several West Philadelphia neighborhoods near Presbyterian Hospital and Drexel University, EAT Café is in the throes of its busiest night since opening six weeks ago in October.

EAT, which stands for “Everyone At the Table,” is the first restaurant of its kind in Philadelphia. The not-for-profit restaurant aims to provide a sit-down dining experience to residents of the city’s low-income neighborhoods by allowing patrons to pay whatever they can afford for their meals.

Philly’s New Pay-What-You-Can Restaurant Brings Everyone To The Table

Photo: Kristen Hartke for NPR

4

‘Bon Appétit’ video of white chef explaining how to eat pho is peak cuisine Columbusing

A video about Vietnamese noodle soup pho has Bon Appétit in some pretty hot water. The video featured Tyler Akin, a chef at Philadelphia-based Vietnamese pho restaurant Stock, speaking about his philosophy on pho, which included telling those who eat pho how to eat it properly, which includes not adding Sriracha or hoisin sauce to the broth.

Commenters inundated the video with a range of criticisms — some lighthearted, some more serious.

Bon Appétit has since removed the video and issued an apology on their Facebook page — but here’s where things get even more interesting.