peter-george

Telegram sent August 9, 1964,
To METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER and FILMWAYS,
c/o Legal Dept. MGM Studios, Culver City, Calif.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT ANY REPETITION WHATSOEVER OF YOUR FULL PAGE ADVERTISEMENT APPEARING IN THE AUGUST 9, 1964 EDITION OF THE NEW YORK TIMES, WILL RESULT IN IMMEDIATE LEGAL ACTION FOR RESTRAINT AND DAMAGES. THE AFORESAID ADVERTISEMENT HAS SUBSTANTIALLY DAMAGED MY CLIENTS, POLARIS PRODUCTIONS, STANLEY KUBRICK AND PETER GEORGE, IN THAT YOU HAVE DELIBERATELY ATTEMPTED TO MISLEAD THE PUBLIC INTO BELIEVING THAT THE WORLD-WIDE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE, “DOCTOR STRANGELOVE,” WAS WRITTEN BY YOUR EMPLOYEE, TERRY SOUTHERN, WHEN, AT ALL TIMES, YOU WERE AWARE OF THE FACT THAT HIS CONTRIBUTION WAS IDENTIFIED BY HIS THIRD POSITION SCREENPLAY CREDIT BEHIND MR. KUBRICK AND MR. GEORGE.

LOUIS C. BLAU
ATTORNEY AT LAW
BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA

9

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (Stanley Kubrick, 1964).

Dear every screenwriter, read this: Stanley Kubrick, Terry Southern and Peter George’s screenplay for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only).

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“What we are dealing with,” said Kubrick at our first real talk about the situation, “is film by fiat,  film by frenzy.” What infuriated him most was that the “brains” of the production company could evaluate the entire film – commercially, aesthetically, morally, whatever – in terms of the tour de force performance of one actor. I was amazed that he handled it as well as he did. “I have come to realize,” he explained, “that such crass and grotesque stipulations are the sine qua non of the motion-picture business.” And it was in this spirit  that he accepted the studio’s condition that this film, as yet untitled, “would star Peter Sellers in at least four major roles.” It was thus understandable that Kubrick should  practically freak when a telegram from Peter arrived one morning: Dear Stanley: I am so very sorry to tell you that I am having serious difficulty with the various roles. Now hear this: there is no way, repeat, no way, I can play the Texas pilot, ‘Major King Kong.’ I have a complete block against that accent. Letter from Okin [his agent] follows. Please forgive. Peter S.

For a few days Kubrick had been in the throes of a Herculean effort to give up cigarettes  and had forbidden smoking anywhere in the building. Now he immediately summoned his personal  secretary and assistant to bring him a pack pronto. —Notes from The War Room by Terry Southern

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Before Terry Southern got involved there was this script for Strangelove  which includes the pie-fight and “is framed as a film within a film, made by extraterrestrials, no less.”

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There seemed to be a tacit agreement the story would not be at all funny. Not now. —Peter George, Two Hours to Doom (aka Red Alert)

Terry Southern’s profile of Stanley Kubrick that Esquire squelched in the 1960s… lucky for us it has been rescued:

In 1963, as Stanley Kubrick began production on Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Terry Southern completed a profile of the director for Esquire, which promply shelved it. Earlier this summer it was finally printed in Killed: Great Journalism Too Hot To Print (Nation Books), edited by David Wallis. The abridged version of Southern’s article  that follows is reprinted on the occasion of Sony Pictures Repertory’s 40th anniversary presentation of Dr. Strangelove  this fall. —CHECK-UP WITH DR. STRANGELOVE By Terry Southern

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An Interview with Stanley Kubrick Director of LOLITA
by Terry Southern; Unpublished; 1962; NYC

At the time of this interview (1967), Southern was famous as the ­coauthor of Candy, the best-selling sex novel, and as the screenwriter ­behind Stanley Kubrick’s dark antiwar, antinuke comedy, Dr. Strangelove. Both ­appeared in the U.S. in 1964 (a headline in Life magazine read “Terry Southern vs. Smugness”). By 1967 he could be spotted on the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, standing between Dylan Thomas and Dion. Gore Vidal called him “ the most profoundly witty writer of our generation.” Lenny Bruce blurbed his books. —Paris Review - The Art of Screenwriting No. 3, Terry Southern

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Inside: 'Dr. Strangelove or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb’  (2000), a behind-the-scenes documentary about the making of one of the classics of modern cinema. Including interviews with many members of the cast and crew of this story about the scramble by the heads of state to head off a rogue general’s attempt to launch a nuclear war, this film gives fans a wealth of new information on the work and effort that went into bringing the film to fruition.

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Peter George is the forgotten man among Aussie fast bowlers. But today he sliced through NSW’s batting line-up like Julia Gillard once did Kevin’s neck, taking 5 wickets for 28 runs in next to no time at all.

It pains me to see NSW floundering at 6/133, effectively 7/133 because Beau Casson is currently in hospital after his congenital heart defect flared up during the match, which kills me, it really does. GET WELL SOON, BEAU <3

But through all this, I can’t help being thrilled for Peter because he is MAGNIFICENT and if he can challenge the legions of other quicks hoping for a Test spot, all the more power to him. I LOVE PETER GEORGE.

Bruce Lee was born Peter George Dinsdale in 1960. At birth he had epilepsy, partial paralysis, and a deformed arm. Until he was 3 he lived with his grandmother, then moving on to live with his mother and her husband until their relationship ended. At nineteen, he changed his name to show how much he idolised his favourite kung-fu star.

Lee was also a pyromaniac, claiming that the tingling in his fingers signalled him that it was time to light a fire. One of his first fires caused £30,000.00 of damage to a shopping centre. He killed his first person in 1973.

On January 5, 1977, eleven men were killed and six people injured when he set a local rest home on fire. An old man slapped him for disturbing some pigeons, and Lee threatened to kill him. Later, the birds were all found with their necks wrung, and the man burned to death in his armchair. It was ruled an accident until years later when Lee admitted to it.

In 1980, a fire on Selby Street, in Hull, killed a woman and her three sons. About 18,000 people were questioned during the investigation for the fire, until one of the victims was discovered to have been acquainted with various homosexuals who frequented the public restrooms near his home.

Lee, who had confessed to a bunch of fires over the past 20 years was one of these homosexuals.

In all, 26 people died in Lee’s fires, and he was charged with multiple counts of manslaughter. He plead guilty on all counts, and was sentenced to an indefinite term in a mental hospital. Lee stated “I am devoted to fire…Fire is my master, and that is why I cause these fires.”

4

Upper Lawn Cottage (Solar Pavilion)
Upper Lawn, Wiltshire, South West England, UK; 1959-62

Alison and Peter Smithson
(photographs by Georg Aerni, 1995/2001)

«Housing, of course, is not merely a cottage question; it is an immense national question and also an immediately individual question in which we should all be decidedly interested. (…) Our aim should be to develop a fine tradition of living in houses. It is a matter for experiment, like flying. We should seek to improve in detail point by point. (…) Exquisite living on a small scale is the ideal. “House-like” should express as much as “ship-shape”. Our airplanes and motors and even bicycles are in their way perfect. We need to bring this ambition for perfect solutions into housing of all sorts and scales. (…) A motor-car is built with thought for “style”, that is finish and elegance, but it is not built to look like a sedan chair or a stage coach.
We must aim at getting the small house as perfect as the bicycle.»; William Lethaby, ‘Housing and Furnishing’ (1920)

see map | related posts
+ Georg Aerni | information 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

via “Complex ordinariness: the Upper Lawn Pavilion by Alison and Peter Smithson"; Bruno Krucker, with a photographic essay by Georg Aerni; Gta Verlag, Zürich (2002)

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS (1956). David Niven, Cantinflas, and an ensemble cast race around the planet in this adaptation of the Jules Verne novel by director Michael Anderson.