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The Lovely Bones (2009) dir. Peter Jackson

“These were the lovely bones that had grown around my absence. The connections, sometimes tenuous, sometimes made at great cost, but often magnificent., that happened after I was gone. And I began to see things in a way that let me hold the world without me in it.”

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Ladies and gentlemen, some of the 100000 reasons why I will love the Lord of the Rings movies and the cast till the end of times.

Have you ever thought about how in the Fellowship of the Ring...

In the film’s prologue, Galadriel narrates the forging of the Great Rings. But there’s a really cool hidden message in how the shots are set up…

The shots of the elves only show them looking at their rings, nothing else…

The shots of the dwarves only show them looking at their rings, nothing else…


But when we get to the nine rings given to men “who above all else desire power”….the men don’t look at their rings. They look straight into the camera.

 

And while other shots are composed to make you look at the magic rings,  everything in this shot is designed to make sure you look back into the eyes of the man in the center. 

Why?


Because these men are looking at you, the audience: because you are one of them.

It’s a reminder that you are also a member of the race of men, and before you call The Nine weak-willed and evil you must remember that you are just as fallible and could be corrupted by power just as they were…that their flaws are only a dark reflection of your own flaws, and the flaws common to all of mankind


  • <p> <b>Tolkien:</b> By the end of the Third Age, Sauron's physical power is so diminished that his presence is confined to the tower of Barad-Dur. However, he is still immensely powerful in his ability to watch and predict the movements of his enemies, and his understanding extends so far that he could metaphorically be referred to as a Great Eye, constantly watching and planning his next move. And because his gaze is so piercing, it is sometimes likened to fire.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Okay but...hear me out...what if Sauron was literally....a Great Eye.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> What.<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> What if he was literally a giant eyeball on the top of Barad-Dur.<p/><b>Tolkien:</b> That's not quite what I inten-<p/><b>Peter Jackson:</b> Made of FIRE. A LITERAL GIANT FIERY EYEBALL.<p/></p>
Cool Depressing Fellowship of The Ring “Easter Egg”

During Boromir’s death scene in the Fellowship of the Ring film, you a hear a choir in the soundtrack. The choir isn’t singing random vowel sounds; they’re actually singing in Elvish.


The English translation of the lyrics? It’s a line from the books: “I do not love the sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only what they defend.”


For bonus hurt points– in the book, those lines were said by his little brother Faramir.

(other LOTR soundtrack facts: 2 3)

Legolas must be so confused about death

In the screenwriters’ and actor’s commentary/interviews for Lord of the Rings, they say they portrayed Legolas as an immortal elf who’s always lived among immortal elves, who has never encountered death or grief before. 

His “arc” in Lord of the Rings is about confronting death for the first time in his immortal life, and struggling to understand it.

But like…Legolas must be so confused by the idea of death??? Because everyone who “dies” keep coming back???? 

Just imagine: 

Legolas: So when is Boromir coming back?
Aragorn: Legolas…Boromir’s dead.
Legolas: Gandalf was dead. He’s back.
Aragorn: That’s different—
Legolas: You fell off that cliff, and you came back.
Aragorn: But I wasn’t really—
Legolas: Merry and Pippin were dead, but they came back.
Aragorn: But they–
Legolas: *busy looking around for Boromir*