perspective-in-motion

The Cosima/Delphine reunion was so beautifully performed and shot, it was really just a matter of doing the best with the amazing stuff I was given. There were a few things I brought to it. For example, I really wanted to do the abrupt changes between Cosima’s slow-motion perspective and the frantic activity within the yurt. I also wanted to treat the editing more from Cosima’s perspective. So I would hold on long shots of her face trying to absorb what’s happening and have much quicker cut shots of Delphine, or shots of Delphine from more obscured angles. I really wanted that first eye contact with them in the yurt to connect strongly. That was just an emotional thing that felt right to me. But, I knew those scenes were pretty special when I was putting them together. The whole structure of the finale hinged on those scenes really working well, but I never had any worries there. Those two just have a certain magic that comes across on screen.
—  Jay Prychidny - The Hive.

           “The Cosima/Delphine reunion was so beautifully performed and shot, it was really just a matter of doing the best with the amazing stuff I was given. There were a few things I brought to it. For example, I really wanted to do the abrupt changes between Cosima’s slow-motion perspective and the frantic activity within the yurt. I also wanted to treat the editing more from Cosima’s perspective. So I would hold on long shots of her face trying to absorb what’s happening and have much quicker cut shots of Delphine, or shots of Delphine from more obscured angles. I really wanted that first eye contact with them in the yurt to connect strongly. That was just an emotional thing that felt right to me. But, I knew those scenes were pretty special when I was putting them together. The whole structure of the finale hinged on those scenes really working well, but I never had any worries there. Those two just have a certain magic that comes across on screen.”

                                                            — Jay Prychidny - The Hive.

vimeo

Let’s start 2017 where I spend a lot of video time, in Iceland. Hard to find better place for that, and this clip comes from one of my favorite studios too.

Ethereal is an experimental film shot in the remote, breathtaking Icelandic Highlands that combines aerial cinematography with timelapse and hyperlapse. Experience unique parts of Iceland few get to explore from a entirely new perspective: aerial motion timelapse.
Locations include: Askja, Eyjafjallajökull, Kerlingarfjöll, Landmannalaugar, Thórsmörk, Vatnajökull, and Stokksnes.
Each frame is a raw photo shot with the DJI Inspire 1. The individual photos were processed using LRTimelapse, Lightroom and After Effects. The film was then edited in 4K60 in Premiere Pro.

Web: EvosiaStudios.com
FB: Facebook.com/evosiastudios
Instagram: @evosia
Twitter: @evosia

anonymous asked:

In terms of animation quality, what's your favorite scene im mp100?

I could probably write wayyyy too long about any particular scene and why it’s so successfully animated so I’ll go with one shot:

the shot is like 30+ seconds so I cant make a gif so here’s a link someone clipped of it.

from a technical standpoint I just love how it switches depth and perspective all while keeping motion and it feel so rewarding. Everything has a certain snappiness to the motion and a smooth buildup it’s so amazing to watch- which in context to what’s happening makes perfect sense.

This entire fight scene is so well done because it felt so visceral, it could’ve easily been done in standard shots and stagnant movements but it was all fluid and felt alive. I really appreciate bones compromising single frame aesthetics when the time is right. Mob and Ritsu didn’t look ‘beat up’ in the sense of a small cut and bruise, both were like putty. It hurt to watch. Then having this cut? it’s rewarding.

mob psycho is one of those animations where it’s so hard to pick a favorite because it’s so consistently good. The finale is excellently animated but I’ve watched the series through twice and I still find shots like this, so much care was put into making this show breathe. it’s quality. bones is so good.

by the way, if you ever want to watch a video that catalogs all the key animators on the team with a little history of each these two videos will be nice.

On this day in 1910, Karel Zeman was born in Ostroměř, in what was formerly known as Austria-Hungary.  Zeman was an early pioneer of directing fantasy films using techniques such as forced perspective, stop motion, and other live action animation tricks to create otherwise impossible to film sequences, earning him the monicker “The Czech Méliès” (after the French film maker and illusionist who pioneered most of the special effects technique that early cinema relied on).   
 
Zeman’s career began in advertising, with his first endeavor in the medium taking place on the set of an advertisement for French soap.  Shortly after, he began working as a special effects hand in collectives and various productions before making a short animated film with his brother.  His subsequent short animated films gained recognition through the Czech Republic, and earned him enough notoriety that in 1952, Zeman made his first feature length film The Treasure of Bird Island, procuring enough accolades to establish the film maker in a career making feature films until the 1980’s. 

So influential was Zeman’s craft, that film makers and animators like Jan Švankmajer, Tim Burton, Ray Harryhausen, Wes Anderson, and Terry Gilliam have all claimed to be heavily inspired by his work, with Gilliam once stating “He did what I’m still trying to do, which is to try and combine live action with animation."  In order to fully appreciate Zeman’s work, we’ve enclosed a link to part one of a video about the techniques he used, from a special behind the scenes documentary vantage point.  The clip shows some very simple techniques which when applied properly can give fantastic results, even for independent film makers.
[ The Magic World of Karel Zeman ]

Perspective In Motion presents John Baluyut

John is one of the smoothest young choreographers you are ever going to meet hailing from Project D Dance Company and The Mooks in New Jersey. From “Say Yeah” by Wiz Khalifa to assisting in developing the masterpiece of a team we all call PROJECT D. If you have not heard of him here is your opportunity to check him out! Check out John B.’s choreography!

“Touched by an Angel” - Lloyd

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKixTV2HFUg

“Deep” - Blackstreet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXWfoFVJONM

Please help support dance community artist. Come out and have the privilege of dancing with John B of Project D Dance Company and The Mooks!!:)

youtube

Motion+Sound: The Reign FC Home Opener

Reign FC commissioned LEVYFilms to capture the Reign FC home opener against the Boston Breakers on Sunday, April 13 from their unique perspective. The result: Motion+Sound - a short film that serves as a celebration of the 3-0 win against Boston.