perraud

Stop settling for friends who make you feel like you can’t be yourself, or that you have to change a large part of who you are in order to be good enough for them.

Stop settling for a life of sitting still, of watching other people go after what they want while you sit back because you’re too afraid to try.

Stop settling for toxic social environments. If you’re invited to a dinner outing with a group of gossipy and judgmental people, politely decline. If you have to go because it’s a work thing or because you need to support your partner, go for an hour and leave. Don’t ever give more of yourself and your energy than you need to.

Stop settling for being an ‘okay’ friend. If a friend is going through a bad breakup, show up to their apartment with beer and cake and don’t leave until they’re ready for you to leave. Show up for the people who show up for you.

Stop settling for the idea that fear is always something that should be avoided. If your heart starts pounding when you think about applying for that job or signing up for that acting class or trying to make amends with that one friend, listen to it. Embrace the fear. Fear is a compass.

Stop settling for a life of being on autopilot. Of commuting to work like a zombie, of playing on your phone instead of being fully present for movie night with your friends, of thinking about what you’re going to say next when you’re talking to someone. Just let yourself relax, and be there. Something will always come afterwards, just trust.

Stop settling for the idea that happiness is a milestone to attain instead of a state of being. At some point, you must grasp that if you just keep chasing and chasing, there will always be something new to want. But if you start focusing on the joy of being, simply being, you’ll have a much easier time finding happiness. After all, it’s already there. It’s always been there.

(Source: thoughtcatalog.com)

Daguerreotype portrait of a group of artists in Rome, the Papal States, c. 1846. By Philibert Perraud.