period modern

Currently, Shuten has a modern verse in which she’s a human, but I’ve been thinking about a verse in which she survived and is still alive as an Oni during the modern period…

Just a PSA

Please ladies, don’t make fun of women who wear pads. Like, don’t call them a dipper butt or a child or anything thing else degrading for not inserting a tampon in their vagina.

Some of us can’t physically do it for medical reasons and it hurts to try and if you manage it, it’s just even more excruciating to pull out. A lot of women fear TSS that runs rampant when a tampon is inserted for too long. Other women like me do it because it’s more comfortable for us.

For whatever reason it is, don’t make fun of it!

It’s already enough that periods in modern day society are considered taboo and shameful to have in any way shape or form, we don’t need to feel bad about how we contain it too.

10

                                    modern companions + period costumes

anonymous asked:

You said the Republican party fought against slavery.. That is true, but the Republican party around that time period have more modern Democrat beliefs. They were northerners who believed in equal rights. And the Democratic party in the 1800s had view more similar to modern Republican beliefs. The party's beliefs flip flopped around late 1800s-early 1900s.. The conservative states were always advocating for slavery and oppression. They were also the last states to give women the right to vote.

Originally posted by onemorechapter11

Let’s discuss some history then.

1791 - The Democratic-Republican Party is formed by James Madison and Thomas Jefferson against Alexander Hamilton’s Federalist Party. The Democratic-Republicans strongly opposed government overreach and expansion, the creation of a national bank, and corruption.

1804 - Andrew Jackson purchases the plantation that will become his primary source of wealth.

1824 - The Democratic-Republican Party split. The new Democrats were supported by Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren, and the National Republicans were supported by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay.

1828 - Andrew Jackson is elected President of the United States.

1830 - Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, whereby the Cherokee and other native tribes were to be forcibly removed from their lands.

1831 - Cherokee Nation v. Georgia, whereby the Supreme Court ruled that Cherokee Nation was sovereign and the U.S. had no jurisdiction over Cherokee lands. Andrew Jackson had already started to enforce the removal of the Choctaw.

1832-33 - The Whig Party is formed in opposition to Jackson’s government expansion and overreach in the Nullification Crisis and the establishment of a Second National Bank. The Whig Party successfully absorbs the National Republican Party.

1838 -  Many Indian tribes had been forcibly removed. Under Jackson, General Winfield Scott and 7,000 soldiers forced the Cherokee from their land at bayonet point while their homes were pillaged. They marched the Cherokee more than 1,200 miles to the allocated Indian territory. About 5,000 Cherokee died on the journey due to starvation and disease.

1854 - The Whig Party dissolves over the question of the expansion of slavery. Anti-slavery Whigs and anti-slavery democrats form the Republican Party with their sole goal being to end slavery.

1861 -The election of President Lincoln spurs the beginning of the Civil War.

1862 - Lincoln writes a letter where he declares he wishes to preserve the union regardless of the morals on slavery. He issues the Emancipation Proclamation, whereby all slaves in Union territories had to be freed. As states came under Union control, those slaves too had to be freed.

1863 - Frederick Douglass, former slave and famous Republican abolitionist, meets with Lincoln on the suffrage of emancipated slaves.

1864 - Lincoln revised his position on slavery in a letter to Albert G. Hodges stating “If slavery is not wrong, nothing is wrong.”

1865 - Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrenders at the Appomattox Courthouse to Union victory. After Lincoln’s Assassination, Democrat President Johnson issues amnesty to rebels and pardons the slave owners of their crimes.

1865 - The 13th Amendment which ended slavery passed with 100% Republican support and 63% Democrat support in congress.

1866 - The Klu Klux Klan is formed by Confederate veterans to intimidate black and Republicans through violence, lynching, and public floggings. They gave open support to the Democrat Party.

1866 - The Civil Rights Act of 1866 is vetoed by Democratic President Andrew Johnson. Every single Republican voted and overturned the veto.

1868 - The 14th Amendment which gave citizenship to freed slaves passed with 94% Republican support and 0% Democrat support in congress. The first grand wizard of the KKK, Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest is honored at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

1868 - Representative James Hinds who taught newly freedmen of their rights is murdered by the KKK.

1870 - The 15th Amendment which gave freed slaves the right to vote passed with 100% Republican support and 0% Democrat support in congress.

1871 - The violence of the KKK grew so savage that congress passed the Enforcement Acts to repress their influence.

1875 - Democrat Senator William Saulsbury speaks out against the Civil RIghts Act of 1875, claiming it will allow “colored men shall sit at the same table beside the white guest; that he shall enter the same parlor and take his seat beside the wife and daughter of the white man, whether the white man is willing or not, because you prohibit discrimination against him.“

1884 - A train conductor orders Ida B. Wells, a black Republican woman, to give up her seat and move to the smoking car. Wells was an investigative journalist who worked for a Republican journal to expose the horror of lynching. She advocated for the 2nd amendment rights for blacks so that they could protect themselves, and she denounced the Democratic Party for treating blacks as property unequal to whites.

1892 - Democrat Benjamin Tillman is re-elected to the Senate. He was a white supremacist who boasted his participation in lynchings. He is quoted saying that “as long as the Negroes continue to ravish white women we will continue to lynch them.”

1915 - Democrat President Woodrow Wilson screens KKK promotion film Birth of a Nation. The film pictured blacks as ignorant and violent savages, and the Klu Klux Klan as rescuers and protectors of the civilized world. The popularity of the movie revived the Klu Klux Klan which had previously gone extinct. Reportedly Wilson said about the film that “[it] is like writing history with lightning, and my only regret is that it is all so terribly true.”

1919 - The 19th Amendment which officially gave women the right to vote passed with 82% Republican support and 54% Democrat support in congress.

1924 - Thousands of Klansmen attend the 1924 Democratic National Convention.

1933 -  The chief Nazi newspaper, Volkischer Beobachter, praised “Roosevelt’s adoption of National Socialist strains of thought in his economic and social policies” and “the development toward an authoritarian state.”

1933 - Democrat President Franklin Delano Roosevelt passes the Agricultural Adjustment Act with the well-meaning goal to help farmers and sharecroppers. Instead, though it aided white farmers, it resulted in increased unemployment and displacement of black farmers.

1933 -  FDR established the National Recovery Administration to stimulate business recovery by forcing employers to pay higher wages for less work. This relief program was enforced on a local level and allowed Jim Crow racism to flourish, resulting in many blacks being fired to be replaced by whites. 

1934 -  The Federal Housing Administration is introduced under FDR. The FHA made homeownership accessible for whites, but explicitly refused to back loans to black people or even other people who lived near black people.

1936 - The Roosevelt Administration finally begins vying for the black vote. Though the relief programs neglected blacks, their communities were bombarded with advertisements. FDR began to garner black support though the vast majority remained economically unchanged and locked into poverty.

1942 - FDR orders American citizens of Japanese ancestry from their homes into interment camps without due process after the bombings at Pearl Harbor.

1953 - Senator Robert Byrd is elected into congress and remains a staunch Democrat until his death in 2010. He was a prominent member in the KKK and praised by Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, and Hillary Clinton.

1955 - Democrat Richard Daley is elected mayor of Chicago. He resisted residential desegregation, defended public school segregation, and used urban renewal funds to build massive public housing projects that kept blacks within existing ghettos.

1957 - The Civil Rights Act of 1957 is passes with 93% Republican support and 59% Democrat support.

1963 - After the assassination of JFK, Lyndon B. Johnson is sworn into office. LBJ was a Democrat remembered by a famous quote: “I’ll have them niggers voting Democrat for the next 200 years.”

1965 - The Voting Rights Act of 1965 passes with 94% Republican support and 73% Democrat support.

1968 - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is assassinated. MLK voted Republican.

1960-70s - A total of 24 Democratic members of congress switched to become Republican over a 20 year period. The majority of democrats in that time period remained democrats.

1995 - Dreams from My Father by Barack Obama is published. Obama discusses how the urban cities would become the new plantation for blacks under Democrat political bosses: “The plantation, the blacks have the worst jobs, the worst housing, police brutality rampant; but when the so-called black committee man come around election time, we’d all line up and vote the straight Democratic ticket. Sell our souls for a Christmas turkey. White folks spit in our faces, and we reward them with the vote.“

2009 - Hillary Clinton lauds Margaret Sanger, KKK advocate, white supremacist, and eugenicist at the 2009 Planned Parenthood Honors Gala: “I admire Margaret Sanger enormously, her courage, her tenacity, her vision. I am really in awe of her, there are a lot of lessons we can learn from her life.”

Me: 1
History revisionism: 0

Originally posted by whiteangelxoxo

yumi-yuka-yuki  asked:

The way you make Jefferson seem so crazy is so funny it's great :D

Ah! Thank you!! When you said crazy, it brought to mind a conniving Jefferson, you know, an actual “working behind the scenes, class A asshole”…

When in reality the way I draw Jefferson is just–

(Still an asshole mind you)

Silver Pocket Watch from Scotland dated to 1615 on display at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh

Made by the famous Scottish watchmaker David Ramsay who moved to England with King James VI/I and was probably gifted by James to his favourite at the time, the Earl of Somerset. It is recorded that James fell for the young Earl of Somerset, then Robert Carr, when he was injured at a Joust.

The interior of the lid bears the Order of the Garter motto Honi soit qui mal y pense which in Old French can translate to “Shame be to him who thinks evil of it.”

Just a reminder.

I keep getting a lot of asks and messages saying things like “These spells sound like superstition or folk beliefs.” and I’d like to just cover that for a moment.
That’s because they are. 

Witchcraft is a skill rooted in superstition and folklore. 
Folklore is the recorded beliefs of the people at any given time. 
For traditional witches, they mainly base their craft around folklore from the European and American (there’s a tiny bit of a difference) Early Modern Period, but many go beyond that as well. 
That folklore gives us key insight as to what witches and cunning folk would have been doing and how they would have been practicing. 

I actually would encourage using folklore rather than witchcraft books to learn the ways. You would be carving the meaning from those stories and using it in your own practice, finding your own definitions, fashioning your own techniques. Really think about these things. 

I’ll give you an example. 
Blue Jays are, in the Southern states, thought to go to Hell on Fridays, bringing sticks and other things down to the Devil. 
So if you wanted a little assistance on your spirit flight down to the Roots of the World Tree, what spirit do you think would be useful? 
You might take a page out of the old books and fly on the back of a blue jay spirit right down to whatever Nether world you’re looking to explore. Obtaining a blue jay spirit is another post for another time, but there’s the point.

Even things as little as “Roses are for love” is folklore. It’s an association made a long time ago and kept up until this point in history. 

More Reibert Headcanons!

These have been hanging out in my drafts for a while, so I figured with season 2 and all I should post them! (these are also to continue off of my last post)

  • Reiner loves sending Bertholdt Snapchats… of everything. Selfies, everyday life, cute animals, food, literally everything. He just gets excited about things and wants to share his fun with his boyfriend. Bert thinks this is adorable though and appreciates that Reiner thinks of him so much. Surprisingly, he’ll often respond with his own - Reiner is pretty much the only person he’ll send snaps to.
  • They both think the other’s eyes are the most beautiful they’ve ever seen.
  • The TV is ALWAYS on during football season. Reiner keeps up with as many teams as he can and often has friends over to watch games with him. Bert might join for a bit, but he's​ usually happier to hang out in his room by himself. Reiner is always sure to check in with him every so often and bring him snacks and kisses.
  • Basketball season, however, is something they enjoy together. Date nights include going out to watch games downtown as well as just staying in, ordering takeout, and yelling at the TV from their couch. They’ll also set up brackets every year for friendly competition (Bert always wins though).
  • They’ve gotten so used to cuddling with each other before they fall asleep that when one is gone, the other now needs a pillow or something soft to hug to sleep. Reiner once caught Bertholdt​ napping with his sweatshirt, but he thought it was adorable and stole Bert’s pillow to snuggle with the next week.
  • Sometimes Bert can be a little forgetful when it comes to taking care of himself, but thankfully Reiner is always there to make sure he sleeps, eats, and takes his meds.
  • Bertholdt gives the best massages. Reiner loves coming home after a busy day, lying down on the bed, and letting his boyfriend rub all the tension out of his shoulders and back. He practically melts to a puddle, and more often than not he’s so relaxed that he’ll fall asleep.
  • If Reiner’s annoying him, Bert will withhold kisses simply by tilting his head up. Reiner hates this. A wrestling match usually ensues.
  • Although sometimes they switch, Bert is usually the big spoon for cuddling. Their bodies fit together nicely… and that way Reiner can grab Bert’s arms and keep him from moving around so much when he sleeps.
  • Despite the confidence he radiates, Reiner will still occasionally need a bit of validation from Bert. He sometimes worries that he’s not doing a good enough job as a boyfriend, even though he pours so much time and energy into the relationship. Above all else, he just wants Bert to be happy. But all it takes are some gentle words of reassurance and sweet kisses from Bert, and suddenly all of Reiner’s fears are gone and replaced with even more love for his boyfriend~
4

The King’s Men Stone Circle, England

The King’s Men are part of the Rollright Stones, a complex of three Neolithic and Bronze Age megalithic monuments near the village of Long Compton, on the borders of Oxfordshire and Warwickshire. Constructed from local oolitic limestone, the three monuments now known as the King’s Men and the Whispering Knights in Oxfordshire and the King Stone in Warwickshire, are distinct in their design and purpose, and were built at different periods in late prehistory.

The King’s Men is a a stone circle which was constructed in the Late Neolithic or Early Bronze Age; unusually, it has parallels to other circles located further north, in the Lake District, implying a trade-based or ritual connection.

By the Early Modern period, folkloric stories had grown up around the Stones, telling of how they had once been a king and his knights who had been turned to stone by a witch; such stories continued to be taught amongst local people well into the 19th century. In the 20th century, the stones became an important site for adherents of various forms of Contemporary Paganism, as well as for other esotericists who hold magico-religious ceremonies there. They also began to appear more widely in popular culture, featuring in television, literature, music and art.

Bit of a Flirt

Request: Can you do a TJeffs image with 16,18, 21?

16: You’re cute with glasses.
18: What are you five?
21: Don’t give me that look! It’s not my fault!

Pairing: Thomas Jefferson x Reader

Warning: lots of sexual innuendos/jokes, swearing? but when do i not swear in fics lmao

Kink Tag: none!

Period: Modern

Song: “Thin Air” - Olivia Holt ft. Jordan Fisher

A/N: So I collabed with @daveeddiggsit for this one and it ended up way cuter than we expected?? lol hope you enjoy!! (also there are several criminal minds references bc i’m like that)


You pushed your glasses back up the bridge of your nose as you continued typing away at your final thesis paper of the semester. Hair up in a bun, and some ratty university sweatpants on, you were looking a little worse for wear. But that was normal during finals week, right?

The library you had been holed up in for the past five hours was dead silent, allowing you to completely focus on your paper. Your eyes were glued to your laptop screen when you heard the sound of a chair scraping backwards but you were too in the zone to look up. As long as they didn’t disrupt your concentration, you’d be good.

“You ever think that the reason you’re wearing glasses is because you’ve been staring at that screen pretty closely for about two hours straight?” You heard a curious, deep voice interrupt your thoughts.

“You ever think about how the library is a quiet place for people to work,” you retorted without looking away from your screen.

“If you really want a quiet place to work, we could head back to my place and work on some other things too, if you know what I mean.” You could practically hear the smirk grow on his face.

“That sounds like one of the first lines in a Criminal Minds episode. Hard pass.”

“You like Criminal Minds? How about you let me profile you.

You finally glanced over and you could see that there definitely was a smirk on the very attractive man’s face. His hair was wildly curly, yet somehow tamable to an extent, facial hair adorned his defined jawline, and his amused brown eyes stared into your slightly-narrowed ones.

If you weren’t supposed to email this paper to your professor in six hours, you probably would’ve taken him up on his advances, but what was more attractive than Smirky Guy was an A on your paper. Which you then turned back to.

“Are you seriously just going to keep ignoring me?” He asked.

“Yup.”

“I’m just going to keep flirting with you until you talk to me.”

“You call saying random pick up lines to a girl whose name you don’t know and receiving little to no response flirting?”

“Yup.” He said, mocking you.

You rolled your eyes and continued to type your paper.

“Aww, come on, four eyes, take a break and talk to me. It won’t hurt anyone.”

You completely turned to him. “‘Four eyes,’ really?” You raised an eyebrow at him. “What are you, five?”

“Hey, ‘four eyes’ isn’t a bad thing. You look cute in glasses.” He grinned at you and even added a wink this time.

Keep reading

The “Folkloric Devil” is a term applied to the figure who appears in folk-tales and legends and who is often called “the devil”, but it’s obvious that he emerges from a different source than the theological background of Christianity.

Old divinities or diminished Gods that maintained a presence in the minds or cultures of European peoples are suggested (often enough, and for good reasons) as a source of this figure; but beyond that, the pre-Christian societies had spiritual forces and persons that they related to in the sense of “outsider” powers that could be shady or tricky or dangerous at times, but who often had kinds of relationships nonetheless with human beings. These are the main source of the “folkloric” Devil/Devils.

The Folkloric devil isn’t concerned with damning souls, primarily, but he always wants to make deals or pacts to help humans who need things, but so that he can gain, too- a sign of his origin in the older world of spirit-relationship and spiritual ecology. In Christian gloss, he begins more and more to want “souls” for his help, but he is always able to be tricked, himself- and this is very important. Human heroes or protagonists can outwit him. This is something that would be impossible to do to the Theological Devil, who is far beyond humans in power, and second only to God himself in power.

Modern Pop Culture produces surprising emergences of the old Folkloric Devil- Charlie Daniel’s song “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” is an appearance of a Folkloric Devil, who can be out-played by the intrepid and arrogant local boy, on the fiddle. There is the Christian conceit of the Devil seeking souls in that song, but that’s just a minor detail, more suited to a Christian audience and born from the imagination of a low Protestant folk singer.

The Folkloric Devil is a being- and a representative of a whole class of beings- who can be engaged with by humans, for gains. They can be harmful, they can be helpful, and they can be outwitted or outdone at times. Sometimes, they become protagonists themselves.

Theological Elites in the Pre-Modern period of Europe saw no distinction between their Theological Devil and the various emergences of the Folkloric Devil. The “Devil” of witch cults and covenants and of individual sorcerers or witches was of the Folkloric variety, though in their own personal understandings, even they may have believed that he was the same as the theological devil, such was the nature of their times. It’s not like there was a neat chart that spelled all this stuff out to earlier people, and folk in Pre-Modern times heard Christian ministers ranting alongside fire-side bards telling folktales, and so the Folkloric Devil/Devils could take on Christian gloss and attributes at times, and the Theological devil could appear in decidedly “folkish” ways.

What’s important to remember is that the Theological Devil doesn’t exist except as the shadow of Christian psychology. He is born from the idealistic Christian imagination, as the necessary counter-ideal or counter-force to their idealistic notion of good, the warped good, the fallen good, born in their continuation of earlier dualistic religious tropes that posited a cosmic war between good and evil cosmological forces.

The Folkloric Devil, on the other hand, very much exists, both in the form of a powerful former divinity worshiped by practically every human culture known previous to Christianity, and as a folk-memory of certain spirit-entities (very much tied to this world) that people have always engaged in relationships with, though they are a group of entities who are, in ways, challenging, dangerous at points, and ambiguous.

The Theological Devil is a remnant of idealism and the diseased imagination of absolutists and idealists. The Folkloric Devil is a remnant of ancient spiritual ecology and human relationships to the wilder, stranger Otherworld.

- Robin Artisson